World News

The Two-Way
5:36 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Chemical Weapons Watchdog Gets Nobel Peace Prize

A United Nations vehicle carrying inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) leaves a hotel in Damascus, on Wednesday. Some 19 OPCW arms experts are in Syria and have started to destroy weapons production facilities.
Louai Behara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:05 am

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, a watchdog group that is overseeing efforts in Syria to eliminate its chemical stockpile, has won the Nobel Peace Prize.

The group, based in The Hague, Netherlands, was formed in 1997. "Since then the OPCW has, through inspections, destruction and by other means, sought the implementation of the convention. 189 states have acceded to the convention to date," the Nobel committee said.

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World
2:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Chemical Weapons Watchdog Group Wins Peace Prize

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. There was a surprise pick from Oslo, Norway, this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF ANNOUNCEMENT)

THORBJORN JAGLAND: The Nobel Peace Prize for 2013 is to be awarded to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, OPCW, for its extensive work for eliminating chemical weapons.

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Middle East
2:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Syrian Rebels Accused Of Atrocities In Latakia

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now as Michele noted, the chemical weapons inspectors have done their work even as Syria's civil war continues. And Human Rights Watch has been examining atrocities in Syria blamed on the rebels, killing civilians, including women and children. New York Times reporter Anne Barnard has just been visiting Syria. How awkward is it for the U.S. to have rebel groups portrayed in this way, committing atrocities?

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Middle East
2:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Egypt Denounces U.S. Decision To Withhold Aid Package

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ever since then-President Mohamed Morsi was forced out of office by Egypt's military, the Obama administration has struggled with how to handle the massive amount of U.S. aid that goes to Egypt and goes mainly to its military. This week the Obama administration made a decision. It is suspending a significant amount of the annual $1.5 billion in aid.

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Parallels
12:16 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

If You Think Wealth Disparity Is Bad Here, Look At Russia

Prospective clients walk past yachts during the Millionaire Boat Show at the Royal Yacht Club in Moscow on Sept. 3, 2011. A new report says Russia has the highest rate of inequality in the world – barring some small Caribbean islands.
Sergei Karpukhin Reuters /Landov
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Technology
9:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Latino Hackers: Encouraging Innovation

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So we've been talking about science and getting people excited about science. You've probably already heard that Latinos are more likely to use social media sites and to access the Internet from mobile devices than other groups are. But the number of Latinos involved in developing the technology is not where many people would like it to be. Hispanics only make up about 4 percent of the people working in the computer industry, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Science
9:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Why Is The Higgs Boson A 'Big Whoop' For All Of Us?

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We've talked before on this program about why Latinos in the U.S. are more likely to tweet and use other social media than other Americans. Today, we're going to hear from a Latino tech leader who wants to boost the Latino presence in the science and business of technology. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Parallels
8:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

In Israel, The Mystery Of Postage Stamps That Don't Add Up

In Israel, the price of sending mail overseas has dropped recently.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:40 am

We had a complicated problem on our kitchen table in Jerusalem. A stack of homemade birthday thank-you notes, tucked in brightly colored envelopes, ready to be whisked off to friends in the U.S. And a commemorative packet of Israeli stamps in all sorts of different denominations, none of which added up to the 6.20 NIS (6 New Israeli Shekels, 20 agorot, or $1.74) it took to mail a letter or postcard from here to the States.

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Parallels
8:24 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Will A Pakistani Teenager Win The Nobel Peace Prize?

Malala Yousafzai, 16, speaks in New York last month. Yousafzai was shot a year ago by the Taliban for her outspoken advocacy in favor of girls' education in Pakistan. She is considered one of the favorites for the Nobel Peace Prize, which will be announced Friday.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:03 am

It hasn't been a great year for peace. War is raging in Syria, grinding conflicts drag on in Afghanistan and Iraq, and assorted insurgencies plague nations from Asia to Africa.

Yet the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced Friday, and one of the favorites would be a striking choice: Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban last year for her outspoken advocacy of girls' education in her native Pakistan.

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The Two-Way
7:43 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Malala Yousafzai Awarded Sakharov Prize

Malala Yousafzai addresses students and faculty after receiving the 2013 Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian Award at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., last month.
Jessica Rinaldi AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:33 am

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot last year by Taliban militants for her advocacy of girls' education, has been awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought by European lawmakers.

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The Two-Way
6:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Cricket's Sachin Tendulkar Announces Retirement

Sachin Tendulkar celebrates scoring his 100th century during the Asia Cup cricket match against Bangladesh in Dhaka on March 16, 2012. He said Thursday that he will retire from test cricket after his 200th test in November.
Aijaz Rahi AP

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Top Stories: Obama, GOP Meet; Alice Munro Wins Nobel In Lit

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:18 am

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Books News & Features
5:39 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Canadian Alice Munro Wins Nobel's Literature Prize

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Swedish Academy, which gives Nobel Prizes out this time of year, calls for master of the contemporary short story. Canadian writer Alice Munro is the winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature. The announcement was made earlier this morning in Stockholm. And joining us to talk about the selection is NPR's Lynn Neary. Lynn, good morning

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Good morning. Good to be here.

GREENE: So we have an editor at MORNING EDITION from Canada, and he literally jumped out of his seat when he heard this news.

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The Two-Way
4:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Libyan PM Freed After Being Held For Hours By Gunmen

Libyan's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan speaks to the media during a news conference in Rabat, Morocco, on Tuesday, two days before he was abducted.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:44 am

Libya's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was abducted Thursday by gunmen reportedly affiliated with former rebels. Hours later, he was suddenly freed.

Government spokesman Mohammed Kaabar said Zeidan has been "set free" and was on his way to the office, according to the LANA news agency.

Update At 8:50 a.m. ET. Reuters, which originally reported that Zeidan had tweeted that he was fine after his release, has withdrawn the story, saying the Twitter account was fake.

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Parallels
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

After Boat Tragedy, Calls For A Unified European Policy

A survivor of the shipwreck of migrants off the Italian island of Lampedusa looks out over the water Tuesday. The tragedy has bought fresh questions over the thousands of asylum-seekers who arrive in Europe by boat each year.
Tullio M. Puglia Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:21 am

Top officials are calling for a change to the European Union's immigration policies after a boat filled with African migrants caught fire and sank off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa on Oct. 4, killing hundreds.

As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports on Morning Edition, the accident shocked Europe.

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Middle East
3:24 am
Thu October 10, 2013

U.S. Delays Egyptian Aid Over Democracy Issue

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When Egypt's democratically-elected president was ousted from power, there was a lot of speculation that the United States might cut off some, if not all, aid to that country. And now the Obama administration has told the interim government in Egypt that it's holding up hundreds of millions of dollars. The message from the United States boils down to this: No Apache helicopters until you can show you're getting back on a path to democracy. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Africa
3:17 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Kidnapped Libyan Prime Minister Freed By Captors

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

The Libya State News Agency has announced Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has been freed. Earlier it was reported that gunmen kidnapped him from a hotel in Tripoli where he resides. The abduction came amid anger among Libya's powerful Islamic militant groups over the U.S. special forces raid that seized a Libyan al-Qaida suspect.

Europe
3:12 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tragedy Prompts Calls For Change To EU Immigration Policies

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:32 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Countries in Europe have been struggling for some time to find a fair balance when it comes to immigration, and those efforts took on more urgency last week. A ship packed with African migrants sank off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa. Hundreds of people drowned, including children and pregnant women. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley begins her report with a reminder that this incident at sea was sadly, not anything new.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Help, help. Don't move.

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Middle East
2:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Aid Workers: Syrian Refugees Unable To Help Their Kids Cope

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:09 am

For two and a half years, Syria has been at war with millions of civilians on the move. U.N. agencies tracking the exodus say about three quarters of the children forced to flee their homes are under the age of 11. A team of child psychologists in Amman, Jordan, make house calls to address the needs of families who do not live in refugee camps.

Middle East
3:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Long Road Ahead For Weapons Inspectors In Syria

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Chemical weapons experts are working on a tight timeline in Syria to document and dispose of that country's stockpiles. The director-general of the chemical weapons watchdog group calls the effort an unprecedented mission. And so far, he says Syria has been cooperating. And the U.S. has even praised Damascus for going along with the plan.

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Shots - Health News
12:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Activists Sue U.N. Over Cholera That Killed Thousands In Haiti

Haitians protest against United Nations peacekeepers in Port-au-Prince in 2010.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:32 am

Human rights activists are suing the United Nations on behalf of five Haitian families afflicted by cholera — a disease many believe U.N. peacekeeping troops brought to Haiti in the aftermath of the devastating 2010 earthquake there.

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Parallels
7:54 am
Wed October 9, 2013

A Recurring Tragedy: Death In A Bangladesh Garment Factory

A Bangladeshi firefighter stands inside a damaged garment factory after it caught fire in Gazipur outside the capital, Dhaka, on Wednesday. The fire killed at least 10 people at the factory.
AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:06 pm

There's been a deadly fire at a garment factory in Bangladesh — the latest in a series of such tragedies and just six months after the worst disaster in the history of the global garment industry.

At least 10 people were killed at the Aswad garment factory outside the capital, Dhaka, early Wednesday. The immediate cause was not known. This factory, like others where tragedy has struck, produced clothes for a number of Western companies.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Wed October 9, 2013

U.S. Suspending Millions In Military Aid To Egypt

Armored vehicles blocking Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, in August.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:36 pm

Update at 4:39 p.m. ET. Recalibrating Assistance:

The State Department says the U.S. is "recalibrating" the assistance it provides Egypt.

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The Two-Way
6:22 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Top Stories: Nobel In Chemistry; Yellen Gets Nod As Fed Chair

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:37 am

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The Two-Way
6:01 am
Wed October 9, 2013

All Talk And No Do: Latest On The Shutdown And Debt Ceiling

The skies over the U.S. Capitol on Monday matched the mood as the partial government shutdown drags on and the nation edges closer to a possible default.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:53 am

One thing is certain: None of the key players in the federal spending impasse is very happy right now.

President Obama is expected to meet with House Democrats on Wednesday and other caucuses in the coming days, The Associated Press reports, amid hope that a deal can be made soon.

Here's a rundown of Wednesday's Morning Edition coverage on the partial government shutdown, which is bumping up against the debate over raising the debt ceiling.

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Iraq
2:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

French Press Agency Tallies Increasing Violence In Iraq

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:13 am

Nearly 5,000 Iraqis have been killed so far this year in sectarian bombings and other terror attacks. Renee Montagne talks to Prashant Rao, the Baghdad bureau chief for AFP, the French Press Agency, which has been keeping a grim tally of the spiraling violence this year in Iraq.

Economy
2:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Global Leaders Watch As U.S. Budget Drama Unfolds

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:04 am

President Obama traded barbs with Republican House Speaker John Boehner on Tuesday, but there was no sign that Congress is any closer to re-opening the federal government. At a news conference, Obama warned that the whole world is watching. It is, and so far the reviews aren't good.

Parallels
1:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Bound By Blood, Divided By Politics: Three Egyptian Sisters

Egyptian women queue outside a polling station during voting on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of then-President Mohammed Morsi, in Giza, Egypt, last December. In a country divided by a political crisis, families are not spared.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:44 pm

Nagwa, Dina and May are sisters. All three are married, all three have children. All three had always been close — until now.

Egypt's political crisis is changing those relationships. Nagwa and May sympathize with the Muslim Brotherhood. Dina, on the other hand, supports the military, arguing that the generals are just keeping extremists at bay.

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Sweetness And Light
12:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Sick Of How U.S. Sports Are Run? Take A Look At Europe

Shadows of journalists are seen next to a FIFA logo after a recent press conference on controversy swirling around 2022 World Cup construction projects in Qatar.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:44 am

Complain all you want about how sports in the U.S. are run, but the playing fields aren't always greener on the other side.

In Europe, FIFA, the soccer federation, is dealing with problems associated with the 2022 World Cup's timing and venue. For one, after awarding the World Cup to Qatar, those running FIFA wonder now if it'd be better to play the games in winter when it will be cooler — only that's when all the European leagues are operating.

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Parallels
3:45 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Asian Allies' Anxieties Rise Amid Washington Paralysis

President Obama listens as Chinese President Xi Jinping answers a question after a bilateral meeting in California on June 7.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 5:24 pm

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government has all sorts of costs — not only in the United States, but also overseas. President Obama had to cancel a trip this week to visit four nations in Asia so he could stay in Washington to deal with the political crisis. That has disappointed — even worried — some of America's friends in the region, who are counting on the United States to stand up to an increasingly assertive China.

The disappointment over the president's no-show in Asia was palpable.

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