PERSPECTIVES: William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace

In a galaxy far, far away… a Jedi knight, a strong-willed princess, and the boy who would be Darth Vader team up to fight the evil empire. Author Ian Doescher's book, William Shakespeare’s THE PHANTOM OF MENACE: STAR WARS® PART THE FIRST, puts the Bard's touch on the controversial Star Wars prequels that will win back fans who were disillusioned by the motion picture...and please poetry buffs alike! Louie Saenz and guest co-host Norma Martinez talk with Ian Doescher about Shakespeare and Star Wars.
Read More

Tuesday at 8pm

Join KTEP for the El Paso Wind Symphony, directed by Ron Hufstader, featuring area Region 22 All State musicians!

Fresh Air

Weekdays at Noon

An award-winning show and one of public radio's most iconic programs, Terry Gross hosts this weekday "talk show" that hardly fits the mold.

Connect With Us

If you've ever visited the Fells Point neighborhood on the Baltimore waterfront, you may have noticed an older man standing on the street corner, telescope in hand. Herman Heyn, self-proclaimed "star hustler," has been setting up in the same place almost every night, offering passersby glimpses of the galaxy for close to three decades.

He knows, because he's been keeping count.

"I just finished my 27th year. I've been out on the street 2,637 times," he says. "It's like being on a Broadway show that has a long run."

It's tough to imagine a time when this country wasn't struggling with cocaine brought into the U.S. from Latin America, and the violence which often accompanies it. But when Netflix's new series Narcos introduces us to brash, Colombian smuggler Pablo Escobar, it's the late 1970s and Escobar is busy with other contraband.

The dance music that moves us in these waning days of summer often does so in minuscule ways. Maybe it has something to do with the merciless mercury levels, but a good portion of our Recommended Dose mix for August doesn't require the flailing of arms and legs. Your brain, however, should be mightily entertained.

The tracklisting includes new music from underground star Joy Orbison, space disco from Japan, ambient beats from Paris, electro from England and a meditative warehouse juggernaut from Belgium.

With a rare mix of blazing speed, safety and energy efficiency, the new Tesla Model S P85D left the folks at Consumer Reports grasping for ways to properly rate the car, after it scored a 103 — out of 100. "It kind of broke the system," says Jake Fisher, director of the magazine's auto test division.

With the passage of a new law earlier this year, North Dakota has become the first state to legalize law enforcement use of armed drones.

Though the law limits the type of weapons permitted to those of the "less than lethal" variety — weapons such as tear gas, rubber bullets, beanbags, pepper spray and Tasers — the original bill actually aimed to ensure that no weapons at all were allowed on law enforcement drones.

The sponsor of the original bill, Republican state Rep. Rick Becker, said he wasn't happy with how that part of the law turned out.

Late August may be the absolutely worst time to launch a political TV blitz. But a Democratic superPAC, Priorities USA Action, is offering up a minicampaign this week and next, warning Republicans that their heated rhetoric on immigration is captured on videotape and being prepped for prime time later in the race.

A decade after Hurricane Katrina — the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history — President Obama told a crowd in New Orleans that the storm was a "man-made" calamity that had as much to do with economic inequality and the failure of government as it did the forces of nature.

"What started out as a natural disaster became a man-made disaster — a failure of government to look out for its own citizens," the president said in a speech at a newly opened community center in the Lower Ninth Ward, a predominantly black neighborhood that was devastated by Katrina.

Picking a mate can be one of life's most important decisions. But sometimes people make a choice that seems to make no sense at all. And humans aren't the only ones — scientists have now seen apparently irrational romantic decisions in frogs.

Little tungara frogs live in Central America, and they're found everywhere from forests to ditches to parking lot puddles. These frogs are only about 2 centimeters long, but they are loud. The males make calls to woo the females.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

His power and talent tested the nuts and bolts of basketball — literally. Darryl Dawkins, who became famous for backboard-shattering dunks after he was the first NBA player to skip college altogether, has died at age 58.

Lehigh Carbon Community College, where Dawkins coached for two seasons, says:

Pages