KTEP - El Paso, Texas

GOOD TO GROW: Florist Association Conference

It's all about the flowers! Hosts Denise Rodriguez and John White along with special guest Sabine Green discuss all you need to know about the West Texas New Mexico Florist Association conference. Sabine Green is the New Mexico State Floral Coordinator and the co-chair of the West Texas New Mexico Florist Association.

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***Originally Aired November 27, 2016***

Emmy Pérez is a California-born writer with roots in El Paso.  Her life and career have led her to follow the course of the Rio Grande...from El Paso to the Rio Grande Valley.  Her latest collection, "With the River on Our Face," contains sprawling beautiful poems inspired by the Rio Grande,the surrounding environment, immigration, and borders.  She joins us on this program to tell us more about the collection and read a few poems.

http://www.emmyperez.com/

Aired July 2, 2017

***Original Broadcast Date: February 15, 2015***

Keith & Russ welcome Robert S. Kerbel, senior scientist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada.  Kerbel explains how regular chemotherapy for cancer patients often involves a "maximum tolerated dose" of treatment, which often taxes the patient and requires several days of recovery before the next treatment.  With metronomic chemotherapy, researchers hope to lower the dose of drugs and make the dosage more frequent.  

Aired July 23, 2017

***Original Broadcast Date: July 6, 2014***

In a rebroadcast from July 6, 2014, Daniel & guest co-host Nancy Lechuga talk with Mary Szybist, author of Incarnadine, the winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Poetry.  Mary describes Incarnadine as a "religious book for nonbelievers."  She explains why the Annunciation plays such a dominant role in her book, and why "visual poetry" (imagine a poem about an apple written in the shape of an apple), though often seen as gimmicky, was a risk she chose to take for a few of the poems in Incarnadine.  http://maryszybist.net/

Today's Poem of the Week is "Night Shifts at the Group Home" read by Mary Szybist.  It comes from her award-winning collection, Incarnadine.

For today's Poetic License, Nancy Lechuga reads a love letter to humanity.

Aired July 23, 2017

Transfronteriza is a women-led cultural organizing project aimed to empower and support the development of the border community. 

Transfronteriza is creating public dialogues and workshops in visual art, textiles, sound recording and movement where women (and other community members) are invited to create costumes, scenery, movement, sounds, text, images and objects that will then be orchestrated together into performances done in El Paso, Ciudad Juarez, and Albuquerque, NM. 

Paradox Traveling Art is mobile art installation created by El Paso/Juarez artist Laura Turon. This art piece is also presented as the first mobile art gallery in El Paso, housed within a converted school bus.

The artistic concept portrays a mobile art gallery as an art piece itself, one that travels and moves beyond the gallery’s walls. Paradox Traveling Art, makes it debut on Thursday, July 27th during the Last Thursdays Art Crawl in downtown. It will be located outside of the El Paso Museum of Art with a reception inside the Museum of Art. 

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The head of the Boy Scouts of America apologized Thursday to the organization's members, telling them that the group did not intend to showcase the "political rhetoric" in President Trump's speech to the National Jamboree earlier this week.

The Girl Scouts of the USA unveiled 23 new badges related to science, technology, mathematics, and nature activities this week, responding to popular demand for activities related to interests such as the outdoors, mechanical engineering, and computer programming.

The new badges will have members designing robots and learning about mechanical engineering, " building and testing rollercoasters, race cars, and gliders," the organization said.

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The nation's highest-ranking military officer said Thursday that the Defense Department was making "no modifications" to current policy regarding transgender service members until President Trump gives more direction.

Hours after President Trump criticized Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski's vote on debating health care legislation, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke reportedly called Murkowski and fellow Alaskan Sen. Dan Sullivan to say their state could run into trouble with the Trump administration.

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President Donald Trump has nominated a new ambassador for international religious freedom - Kansas Governor Sam Brownback.

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President Trump recently tweeted an unusual suggestion - all agree the U.S. president has the complete power to pardon. Which raised the question, can the president pardon himself? Legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg went to find that out.

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The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.6 percent between April and June.

It was nice comeback from the tepid 1.2 percent annual growth rate of the first quarter and more in line with the turbo-charged growth of 3 percent that has been promised by the Trump administration.

The latest growth was partially driven by an increase in consumer spending. It's a positive sign that Americans are opening up their wallets, especially since consumer spending makes up about 70 percent of the economy.

More Money, More Problems For Amazon

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White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, speaking on Fox & Friends Thursday, said the Trump administration's hiring efforts are being hindered by the "hoops you have to jump through" to comply with Office of Government Ethics rules.

"There are so many qualified men and women who wanted to serve this administration and their country who have been completely demoralized and completely disinclined to do so based on the paperwork we have to put forward, divesting assets," Conway said.

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos became an even richer man on Thursday morning, when a sudden surge in Amazon stock made him $1.5 billion overnight. His fortune grew to over $90 billion.

For several hours, Bezos was the richest person on earth — surpassing Microsoft founder Bill Gates. The top billionaire title has previously been claimed by Mexican telecom titan Carlos Slim, Spanish fast-fashion giant Amancio Ortega and investor Warren Buffett — though most of the time, it's firmly in Gates' possession.

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Linda Holmes hosts from L.A. again, joining regular panelists Stephen Thompson, Glen Weldon and our fourth chair this week, Slate's own Aisha Harris.

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A close-up of ice melting in brilliant sunshine is the first thing you see in An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power. It's gorgeous — snow crystals glistening, moisture dripping from them into a pool of water so pure and clear it makes you thirsty.

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If Barney the Dinosaur also played all five members of Voltron, he would look something like Brigsby Bear, a man in a giant teddy bear suit who stomps around against an outer-space backdrop blinking his animatronic eyes and learning lessons. Brigsby Bear Adventures has been on the air for some time, and the substance of those lessons has evolved from simple arithmetic to advanced scientific concepts, often accompanied by a telling refrain: "Curiosity is an unnatural emotion."

Set in the days leading up to the fall of the Berlin Wall, Atomic Blonde takes place in an underworld where the Cold War is over but the conflict continues, like the throbbing of a vestigial limb. In that respect—and perhaps that respect only—it belongs to the tradition of post-war thrillers like Carol Reed's The Third Man or Andrzej Wajda's Ashes and Diamonds, where danger and intrigue exist where they shouldn't and the players involved are enmeshed in self-doubt and crippling mission drift.

The British playwright Alan Bennett once remarked that people are more interesting when they are trying to be good than when they are being bad. That's certainly true of Menashe, a recently widowed Orthodox Jew struggling to raise his young son alone in a Hasidic enclave of Borough Park, Brooklyn. Though he can be a religious dogmatist when it comes to others, Menashe errs abundantly himself and complains routinely in Rodney Dangerfield mode, which sounds funnier in Yiddish.

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The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.6 percent between April and June.

It was nice comeback from the tepid 1.2 percent annual growth rate of the first quarter and more in line with the turbo-charged growth of 3 percent that has been promised by the Trump administration.

The latest growth was partially driven by an increase in consumer spending. It's a positive sign that Americans are opening up their wallets, especially since consumer spending makes up about 70 percent of the economy.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Stung by the new threat of American sanctions, Russia's Foreign Ministry says the U.S. must downsize its diplomatic and technical staff in Moscow and other cities. The ministry is also suspending the U.S. Embassy's use of two sites — a storage facility and a dacha on an island in the Moscow River.

The ministry says the U.S. has until Sept. 1 to cut the number of its staff at the Moscow embassy and at three consulates to match the exact number of Russian diplomats who are working in the U.S. — 455 people, according to the ministry's announcement.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Almost exactly 30 years ago, guitarist John Scofield recorded an album he evocatively titled Loud Jazz. Not quite a decade later, he made one called Quiet. Both albums were statements of intent, widely embraced and justly acclaimed. And despite the obvious differences between the two, both were genuine expressions of Scofield's musical personality, which has always been more flexible than those extreme dynamic markings would seem to suggest.

A ruling by Pakistan's Supreme Court has disqualified Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif from office, ending his tenure in dramatic fashion after a corruption scandal that stemmed from his family's financial dealings.

In most conservative media, the Russia story is still fake news even as daily revelations continue to pile up about contacts between Russians and Donald Trump's inner circle.

The tone taken by conservative outlets has had an impact on voters such as the Bauchles from Watkins Glen, N.Y. They believe the whole Russia story is a sham, a political head-fake crafted by Democrats and by the crooked media.

"I don't think there's any basis to it," said Dennis Bauchle, a farmer, during an interview this week.

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