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ON FILM: Alamo Drafthouse El Paso

Guest host Kyle Alvarado welcomes Oscar Garza, Creative Associate with the new Alamo Drafthouse in El Paso, to tell us more about the cinema's long-awaited opening in El Paso. The theatre offers special screenings of new, classic, and independent films, specialty food & drinks served by a ninja staff, trivia nights for movie buffs, and much more! The Alamo Drafthouse will have a Grand Opening on Friday, May 6, with the opening of Captain America: Civil War. Aired April 30, 2016
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Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Latest from KTEP

  John R. Graef is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga.  Graef is interested in biological modeling, namely how to mathematically model the spread of antibiotic-resistant disease in hospital ICUs.

Aired May 1, 2016

  Carlos Nicolás Flores is the author of "Sex as a Political Condition: A Border Novel."  He joins us to talk about how the idea for the book first set seed during his time at the University of Texas at El Paso two decades ago.  After a visit to Cuba in 2000 as part of a writers' exchange, Flores revisited those ideas into an award-winning early draft.  The book is published as part of Texas Tech University Press's Americas Series, and Flores explains why this publisher took a risk in releasing this book which touches upon some controversial themes.

http://www.carlos-flores.com/

Aired May 1, 2016

  The Rio Grande Review is a nonprofit bilingual publication run by students of the MFA in Creative Writing at UTEP.  Mijail Lamas is the editor and chief of the latest edition, and Daniela Ruelas is the junior editor.  In this bilingual interview (Mijail answers the questions in Spanish), we'll find out how the publication has changed in the past several years, and why the current issue is the most accessible in terms of design.  Contributions to the Rio Grande Review come from within the Creative Department and from poets & writers from around the world.  

You can submit your works of fiction and/or poetry for a future edition of the Rio Grande Review by sending a Word document to rgreditors@gmail.com along with a short bio.  

Aired May 1, 2016


  High school students in the region are getting a valuable lesson in applying to Ivy League east coast schools through  Undergrads College Consulting & Tours...a program that trains students in grades 9-11 in leadership and networking skills, and how to make a lasting first impression. 

Learn more as guest host Richard Dayoub interviews Daniel Valdez and Luis Martinez, co-founders of the program, and Daniel Cisneros, a high school senior who has been through the program and accepted to a number of universities.

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Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

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Time to check your frozen fruit and vegetable packages: CRF Frozen Foods has expanded a voluntary recall to include about 358 products under 42 different brands because of potential listeria contamination.

A full list of the items to avoid was included in the company's press release on Monday. The recall includes all frozen organic and nonorganic fruit and vegetable products manufactured or processed at CRF's facility in Pasco, Wash., since May 1, 2014.

The musician Prince had an appointment to meet with an addiction doctor the day after he died, a lawyer for that doctor said during a news conference this afternoon.

Minnesota Public Radio reports:

Impressed, we are. With your #StarWarsDay celebrations, that is. The fourth is strong on the Interwebs.

It's a time for Star Wars-themed treats.

(Even here at NPR.)

And an excuse to show your creative side.

Of course, even this sacred day is not free of the presidential campaign.

Saying "colleges have been treated as sanctuaries of learning where firearms have not been allowed," Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal vetoed a bill Tuesday that would have allowed licensed owners to carry guns on campus in all but a few buildings.

The "campus carry" legislation, HB 859, would have allowed guns on campuses and in buildings owned by any public college, technical school or other institution, providing exceptions only for areas used for athletic events, dormitories, and fraternity and sorority houses.

Republican Ted Cruz has ended his presidential candidacy, after Donald Trump won Indiana to all but clinch victory. Bernie Sanders also won, with 52 percent of the vote to Hillary Clinton's 47 percent — but he only saw a net gain of less than a dozen delegates.

Here are five stories that tell us where we are right now:

Ted Cruz suspends presidential campaign, clears way for Donald TrumpHouston Chronicle

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NPR Politics

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump likes to say he is self-funding his campaign. That isn't entirely true. He has actually lent his campaign about three-quarters of the $49 million or so that he has spent so far.

That means the campaign can pay him back if it has the money. But there's a deadline. Trump has 11 weeks to repay himself — exactly at the moment when he needs to pivot and start raising cash for the general election campaign.

Donald Trump, the man who would not run, could not be taken seriously and could not win, is the apparent nominee of the Republican Party.

The office in question is the presidency of the United States.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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When you first wrap your head around its plot, the new film Captain America: Civil War seems to have abandoned most of the pointed political content of Marvel's 2006 comics series Civil War, on which it's based. ("Loosely based"? Let's say "semi-loosely based.")

'The Queue' Carries On A Dystopian Lineage

1 hour ago

In an unspecified Middle Eastern city, a doctor is drawn to and troubled by a particular patient file. The file documents the injuries of a man named Yehya, sustained after a skirmish called the Disgraceful Events. Not only are the events shrouded in mystery, Yehya himself does not know who shot him. And the doctor would have already removed the bullet, except for the fact that, in that aftermath of the Disgraceful Events, the government has made it illegal to do so without a certain permit. Yehya must get that permit so the doctor can do the surgery.

Novelist Richard Russo heard a story once: A cop discovers a garage door remote in his wife's belongings, so he goes around town pointing the remote at different garages. The idea, Russo tells NPR's Steve Inskeep, is "if he could find the house where the garage door went up, he would have found his wife's lover."

Growing up in Pennsylvania coal country, writer Jennifer Haigh learned that a lot of what matters in the state can't be seen. It lies beneath the surface, in the form of potential energy. She saw how the boom and bust cycles of mining affected the people of her hometown, which is now poised on the brink of fracking.

She's taken what she knows and turned it into a new novel, Heat and Light. But Haigh says she doesn't think of it as a book about fracking.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

More NPR Arts News

When you first wrap your head around its plot, the new film Captain America: Civil War seems to have abandoned most of the pointed political content of Marvel's 2006 comics series Civil War, on which it's based. ("Loosely based"? Let's say "semi-loosely based.")

Some 80,000 residents of Fort McMurray who have fled the wildfire raging in Alberta, Canada, are now hearing that the fire has destroyed 1,600 homes and other structures. The province is now under a state of emergency; areas around Fort McMurray are also under a boil-water advisory.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

'The Queue' Carries On A Dystopian Lineage

1 hour ago

In an unspecified Middle Eastern city, a doctor is drawn to and troubled by a particular patient file. The file documents the injuries of a man named Yehya, sustained after a skirmish called the Disgraceful Events. Not only are the events shrouded in mystery, Yehya himself does not know who shot him. And the doctor would have already removed the bullet, except for the fact that, in that aftermath of the Disgraceful Events, the government has made it illegal to do so without a certain permit. Yehya must get that permit so the doctor can do the surgery.

Trump's Golf Course, Trump's Rules?

1 hour ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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