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El Paso Pro-Musica Bach's Lunch Series

Sunday January 22 at 2pm, El Paso Pro-Musica presents "Bach's Lunch." The broadcasts feature the special Noon Time Concerts offered each Thursday at Noon at the El Paso Museum of Art. This week, Jerome Lowenthal and Michael Brown present an “Informance,” filled with Piano Excitement.

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Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

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Dr. Tom Fullerton, professor of Economics in the College of Business Administration, shares El Paso's Borderplex Economic Outlook to 2018, as well as taking a look into what a Trump administration may mean to our economy.

Sunday January 22 at 2pm, El Paso Pro-Musica presents "Bach's Lunch." The broadcasts feature the special Noon Time Concerts offered each Thursday at Noon at the El Paso Museum of Art.

This week, Jerome Lowenthal and Michael Brown present an “Informance,” filled with Piano Excitement.

Poet Patrick Rosal joins host Daniel Chacón to discuss his latest book of poems "Brooklyn Antediluvian."

Good to Grow's very own Denise Rodriguez and Jan Petrzelka discuss gardening trends for 2017. 

One of the rising stars of the American winemaking industry is making his first visit to El Paso. André Hueston Mack was a sommelier at Thomas Keller’s renowned French Laundry in California’s Napa Valley and has been featured on ABC’s The Taste and CNBC’s Closing Bell on which he was called a “hero in the wine world.” 

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Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

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Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

An inauguration protest in Washington, D.C., turned confrontational on Friday, as several hundred black-clad protesters broke windows and police responded with pepper spray and a concussive device.

The interim chief of the Metropolitan Police Department, Peter Newsham, said 217 protesters have been arrested, and 6 officers sustained minor injuries.

Two famous ancient structures in the city of Palmyra have been destroyed by ISIS forces, Syria's antiquities chief says.

The Tetrapylon and the facade of the city's Roman theater have both been almost completely demolished, the official says, according to NPR's Alison Meuse.

"Activist Khaled al-Homsi, who is from Palmyra, shared satellite imagery to Twitter, which appears to confirm the scale of the damage," Alison reports. "The face of the Roman theater is a pile of rubble and only four of the Tetrapylon's 16 columns appear to be standing."

Just over 10 weeks after the idea was first proposed in a Facebook post, tens of thousands of protesters are heading to the nation's capital for the Women's March on Washington on Saturday.

Similar marches are planned in more than 600 other cities and towns around the world. But the largest is expected to take place in Washington, D.C., less than 24 hours into the presidency of Donald Trump.

On the day before taking office, President-elect Donald Trump arrived in Washington, D.C., to kick off inaugural festivities.

His first stop: a leadership luncheon at his new five-star hotel, the 263-room Trump International Hotel, blocks from the White House.

The hotel has been the center of a debate over conflicts between Trump's business interests and the presidency.

Incoming White House spokesman Sean Spicer told reporters Thursday Trump's use of the hotel for a reception shouldn't come as a "shocker" to anyone, and he even gave his boss's hotel a plug.

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Corporate Leader Brenda Barnes Dies At 63

3 hours ago

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Hundreds of thousands of Americans are now working as contractors for the rapidly growing ride-hailing industry, specifically for the largest companies, Uber and Lyft. But a new survey, released this week, finds that Lyft, with its fluorescent pink mustache symbol, is more popular with drivers.

In the Central Valley, there's a bumper sticker you see all over the place. It's shaped like California, and reads "My job depends on Ag." In California, that agriculture depends on immigrant labor.

Many farmers in the state supported President Donald Trump despite his hard-line stance on immigration. So as the new Trump administration takes office, what's the thinking of those involved in the region's biggest industry?

Episode 749: Professor Blackjack

19 hours ago

Ed Thorp was the first 'quant', the first person to make mathematical analysis and statistics the center of his investing. But he only got there because of a card game.

As a young man, Ed Thorp was a mathematician doing pretty much what you'd expect a mathematician to do: teaching, studying, trying to solve hard problems. There was one particular problem that nobody else had been able to solve. He wanted to come up with a mathematical system to beat the casino at blackjack.

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Back in 1999, a writer named Daniel Handler decided that kids books were too cheerful. So he adopted the pen name Lemony Snicket, and authored "A Series of Unfortunate Events" — now also a series on Netflix.

We've invited Handler to play a game called "What the hell happened to my Louis Vuitton valise, you monster?" Three questions about baggage handlers.

Elliot Ackerman's new novel Dark at the Crossing is about a man who escaped one conflict zone with his life, and now wants to break into a new one.

Haris Abadi — an Iraqi who worked for U.S. special forces during the Iraq War and later became a U.S. citizen — wants to put his new life on the line to free Syria from the cruel grip of Bashar al-Assad.

But Haris is turned back at the Turkish-Syrian border, then robbed, then taken in by Syrian refugees who make him look into his own commitment. Is it to Syria — or, ultimately, his own definition of himself?

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One of the biggest-ever overseas successes for Disney is grounded in a real-life story out of India.

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As the Women's March on Washington has swelled in support, attracting attention and supporters in the lead-up to Saturday's demonstrations, its name has become something of a misnomer.

Sister marches have been organized in all 50 states, and in countries around the world. They have been organized to express solidarity with the aims of the original march: opposition to President Trump's agenda, and support of women's rights and human rights in general.

Lightning Fill In The Blank

2 hours ago

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Limericks

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Back in 1999, a writer named Daniel Handler decided that kids books were too cheerful. So he adopted the pen name Lemony Snicket, and authored "A Series of Unfortunate Events" — now also a series on Netflix.

We've invited Handler to play a game called "What the hell happened to my Louis Vuitton valise, you monster?" Three questions about baggage handlers.

Prediction

2 hours ago

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NPR News Nuggets: Sharks, Swans & Bears! Oh My!

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Here's a quick roundup of some of the mini-moments you may have missed on this week's Morning Edition.

Inked

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

A three-hour rally is opening the event. The march proper is planned for the mid-afternoon, with a path that's set to extend from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

The Many Faces Of Inauguration Day Attendees

3 hours ago

People traveled to Washington, D.C., from around the country to witness the transition of power to the 45th president of the United States. Amid celebration and clashes, a few faces stood out. Watching giant screens, blocks away from the incoming president, these people braved crowds and weather to watch history being made.


Ken Crider and his wife, Penny

Age: 51

City of Residence: Detroit area

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