University of Texas/Marsha Miller

Out of the Blue: 50 Years After the UT Tower Shooting

Monday July 25th at 9am, join KTEP for a special edition of Texas Standard. In observance of the 50th anniversary of the University of Texas Tower shooting, Texas Standard is producing “Out of the Blue: 50 Years After the UT Tower Shooting.” The broadcast features stories from survivors of the University of Texas Tower shooting on Aug. 1, 1966. Many of these eyewitness stories have not been shared publicly until now.
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Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

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  Breastfeeding mothers are invited to stand for their right to breastfeed in public at the Big Latch On, taking place in August at Bassett Place. On the next episode of THE WEEKEND, we'll visit with Libby Berkeley and Rosalba Ruiz of the Border Breastfeeding Coalition, who will tell us about the event and about the benefits of breastfeeding.

The Big Latch On is Saturday, Aug. 6, registration 9-10am, countdown at 10:15am, at Bassett Place, 6101 Gateway Blvd. West. 

http://www.borderbreastfeeding.org/
 

Aired July 23, 2016

Saturday July 23, 2016, you are invited to honor the life and legacy of one of Latin America’s most influential artists - Frida Kahlo.  July was the month of Frida's birth and death, and to pay tribute to this cultural and feminist icon, Frida Kahlo inspired art by local artists will be auctioned with proceeds to benefit the Hispanic Women's Network of Texas El Paso Scholarship Fund. 

The Artspace El Paso Lofts in downtown El Paso are almost finished, and in the interest of recruiting artist tenants, Artspace has been holding a series of informational sessions througout the city. Here to tell us more about the building and project timeline, life in the lofts and how you can become a tenant are Sarah White and Joe Butler from Artspace. 

  Leaf miners are eating away at elm tree leaves...bores are munching into the barks of stressed trees...how can we control these tiny destroyers?  White flies and spider mites are also prevalent in our hot, dry weather.  Also, if you have recent transplants, should you water them more or less than your established plants?

Aired July 23, 2016

  Guest host Felipa Solis welcomes frequent contributor Kyle Alvarado to talk about some of the films out in theatres right now.  They share their thoughts on "The Secret Life of Pets," "Ghostbusters," and a few shows available for streaming, like "Stranger Things" starring Winona Ryder on Netflix.

Aired July 23, 2016

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With just one weekend to go before Hillary Clinton is expected to accept her party's nomination for president, WikiLeaks on Friday released almost 20,000 emails sent and received by Democratic National Committee staff members from January 2015 to May 2016 – leaving journalists scouring for information potentially damaging to the party.

This year at San Diego Comic-Con, one of the biggest phenomena isn't just inside the convention center, it's all around. Yes, there are billboards and installations trumpeting things like Doctor Strange and Fear the Walking Dead. But the crowds of people here aren't looking up; they're mostly staring down at their phones, playing Pokémon Go.

It's really hot in most of the mainland United States right now. The National Weather Service predicts temperatures in the triple digits through the weekend in much of the South, Midwest and along the East Coast.

The culprit: a "heat dome."

It's a real meteorological event — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration even took the time to define it in the agency's warning this week:

The Justice Department calls it the largest criminal health care fraud case ever brought against individual suspects: Three people are accused of orchestrating a massive fraud involving a number of Miami-based health care providers.

The three facing charges are all from Florida's Miami-Dade County; they include Philip Esformes, 47, owner of more than 30 Miami-area nursing and assisted living facilities; hospital administrator Odette Barcha, 49; and physician assistant Arnaldo Carmouze, 56, the Justice Department says.

Days after Charles Kinsey was shot by North Miami police as the behavioral health care worker tried to help a patient, we now know more about the officer who fired the shot — and according to the head of the local police union, the officer was trying to shoot Kinsey's patient, a man with autism, not Kinsey.

"Fearing for Mr. Kinsey's life, the officer discharged his firearm, trying to save Mr. Kinsey's life," says John Rivera, president of the Dade County Police Benevolent Association. "And he missed, and accidentally struck Mr. Kinsey."

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NPR Politics

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The phrase, "America First" was invoked a few times at this week's Republican convention. That slogan comes with a lot of echoes, and you might wonder how much the people who chant it now really know about its history.

The America First Committee was founded in 1940 by a group of Yale students, many of whom would go on to distinguished careers, and funded by prominent Chicago business leaders. It was one of the largest peace organizations in U.S. history, with more than 800,000 registered members.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Business News

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Summertime means college graduates are on the lookout for work and housing. For those eyeing big city life the trick to paying reasonable rent might mean downsizing — really downsizing.

In coastal cities, where space is scarce and demand is through the roof, there is a new housing trend developing: micro apartments.

Think dorm life, but a little more grown up. Small studio apartments, kitchenettes and beds that fold into the wall to make space.

At Green House Data in Cheyenne, Wyo., energy efficiency is an obsession.

When someone enters one of the company's secured data vaults, they're asked to pause in the entryway and stomp their shoes on a clear rubber mat with a sticky, glue-like finish.

"Dust is a huge concern of ours," says Art Salazar, the director of operations.

That's because dust makes electronics run hotter, which then means using more electricity to cool them down. For data centers, the goal is to use as little electricity as possible, because it's typically companies' biggest expense.

Episode 576: When Women Stopped Coding

Jul 22, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in October, 2014.

Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men.

But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing.

But in 1984, something changed. The number of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged.

Facebook just announced the first full-scale test flight of its unmanned, high-altitude airplane, Aquila. The plane isn't finished yet — the 90-minute test flight assessed only its takeoff and low-altitude flying capabilities — but its ultimate goal is to provide wireless Internet to the ground as it flies.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg shared a video of the test flight.

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Iraqi Dancer's Dreams Cut Short By Terrorism

5 hours ago
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Since his debut novel, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, Dave Eggers has finessed a line between fact and fiction. His latest, Heroes of the Frontier, is a novel about a dentist who, after a bad breakup, packs up and moves to Alaska with her two young children.

Alaska is "a working state" that's "not too precious about itself," Eggers tells NPR's Scott Simon. "It's still very raw and there's still so much of it that you can discover, and be alone."

Copyright 2016 KRTS-FM. To see more, visit KRTS-FM.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden flew four times on the space shuttle and was the first voice to be broadcast from Mars.

We've invited him to play a game called "You're not Charles in Charge — he is!" Click the audio link above to hear Bolden answer three questions about the remarkable career of actor and Republican National Convention speaker Scott Baio.

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With just one weekend to go before Hillary Clinton is expected to accept her party's nomination for president, WikiLeaks on Friday released almost 20,000 emails sent and received by Democratic National Committee staff members from January 2015 to May 2016 – leaving journalists scouring for information potentially damaging to the party.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Iraqi Dancer's Dreams Cut Short By Terrorism

5 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Kabul Bombing Leaves At Least 80 Dead

5 hours ago
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"Sometimes they want to keep it secret," she says with a sigh of exasperation.

Dr. Marlen Baroso is talking about the patients she cares for who have HIV.

"I have a case, a woman is taking medication. And her husband is taking medication also." But neither one knows the other is HIV-positive.

"Husband and wife!" she declares. "And this is not the first case."

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