KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: Artist Suzi Davidoff

Suzi Davidoff has been intricately engaged in the West Texas landscape she calls home, creating drawings paintings and prints that reflect both soil and sky and often incorporating found materials including cochineal, clay, natural charcoal and lichen. Mapping has long been central to her understanding of nature. In her Simplified World exhibition at the Rubin Center which features new work, Davidoff presents a series of drawings on found maps and globes and with an accompanying hand-drawn animation, a new medium for this established artist.

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To be the most effective advocate for social change, you need to understand the underlying social constructs. Dr. Corey Wrenn, Director of Gender Studies and Lecturer of Sociology with Monmouth University in Northeastern New Jersey, has studied food justice and social change with Colorado State University. She joins us to talk about her book, A Rational Approach to Animal Rights: Extensions in Abolitionist Theory.

Dr. Daniel J. Mindiola, Presidential Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, joins host Russ Chianelli as they discuss Mindiola's studies and his latest research. His research program entails the synthesis of transition metal complexes that possess interesting coordination environments, reactive ligand scaffolds, and unusual electronic and magnetic features. To date, his research group has produced more than 120 peer-reviewed scientific contributions. 

Reading was a big part of the Cortez family, and Saturday's were "pancake days." On this week's book club, we visit with UTEP alumn and author, Phillip Cortez. He shares his memories of the Public Library's Bookmobile and how those Saturday pancake specials gave him the idea for his book Pancakes for Dinner.

Marcus Wicker is the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, a Pushcart Prize, The Missouri Review's Miller Audio Prize, as well as fellowships from Cave Canem and the Fine Arts Work Center. His second book, Silencer was published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2017 and is a finalist for an NAACP Image Award. Marcus teaches in the MFA program at the University of Memphis, and he is the poetry editor of Southern Indiana Review and this week we speak with him about his most recent work.

Are you looking for a modern updated approach to your Christmas tree? Or are you brave enough to try a Juniper, Italian Stone Pine or even a Rosemary Bush? Good to Grow hosts share some ideas to help you think outside the box for this holiday season. 

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The nominees for the 2018 Golden Globe Awards were announced early Monday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif.

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The nominees for the 2018 Golden Globe Awards were announced early Monday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two pills to wipe out hookworm could cost you four cents. Or $400.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

To be the most effective advocate for social change, you need to understand the underlying social constructs. Dr. Corey Wrenn, Director of Gender Studies and Lecturer of Sociology with Monmouth University in Northeastern New Jersey, has studied food justice and social change with Colorado State University. She joins us to talk about her book, A Rational Approach to Animal Rights: Extensions in Abolitionist Theory.

Dr. Daniel J. Mindiola, Presidential Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, joins host Russ Chianelli as they discuss Mindiola's studies and his latest research. His research program entails the synthesis of transition metal complexes that possess interesting coordination environments, reactive ligand scaffolds, and unusual electronic and magnetic features. To date, his research group has produced more than 120 peer-reviewed scientific contributions. 

Reading was a big part of the Cortez family, and Saturday's were "pancake days." On this week's book club, we visit with UTEP alumn and author, Phillip Cortez. He shares his memories of the Public Library's Bookmobile and how those Saturday pancake specials gave him the idea for his book Pancakes for Dinner.

Marcus Wicker is the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, a Pushcart Prize, The Missouri Review's Miller Audio Prize, as well as fellowships from Cave Canem and the Fine Arts Work Center. His second book, Silencer was published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2017 and is a finalist for an NAACP Image Award. Marcus teaches in the MFA program at the University of Memphis, and he is the poetry editor of Southern Indiana Review and this week we speak with him about his most recent work.

Are you looking for a modern updated approach to your Christmas tree? Or are you brave enough to try a Juniper, Italian Stone Pine or even a Rosemary Bush? Good to Grow hosts share some ideas to help you think outside the box for this holiday season. 

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