KTEP - El Paso, Texas

FOCUS ON CAMPUS: Randi Zuckerberg

Dr. Ezra Cappel of the Inter-American Jewish Studies Program at UTEP stops by to discuss the program and the upcoming guest speaker they are hosting, Randi Zuckerburg. Randi is an emmy nominted author and pioneer of facebook's early marketing intitaives. She is also Mark Zuckerburg's sister. Randi will be discussing the role of media in our everyday lives plus will be participating in a book signing. The event is Tuesday, February 21, 2017. Aired Feb. 17, 2017

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Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

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People who can learn in groups can do better than those individually, that is the driving concept behind Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL). This week on Science Studio Dr. Pratibha Varma-Nelson, a world authority in the concept of PLTL, discusses the importance of PLTL and how it functions. 

http://pltlis.org/recognition-of-dr-pratibha-varma-nelson/

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

Dr. Nigel Hamilton is a historian and author of various biographies including biographies of President John F Kennedy and President Bill Clinton. On this episode of Perspectives Dr. Hamilton discusses his latest book "Commander in Chief: FDR's Battle with Churchill 1943". This most recent book is part two of the trilogy, "FDR at War". 

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

Ocean Vuong is a poetry phenomena. His first and only book, thus far, titled  "Night Sky with Exit Wounds" is a poetry best seller.  Vuong joins host Daniel Chacón to discuss his book, his upcoming writing projects and his creative process.

http://www.oceanvuong.com/ 

Aired. Feb 19, 2017

One year ago, The Desert Triangle Carpeta brought together artists from the entire southwest to share their love of printmaking with the region. This year, they will continue to showcase excellent printmakers from Mexico City, Oaxaca, San Antonio and El Paso, during their Postre Prints show at the Purple Gallery in downtown El Paso. 

The annual V-Day El Paso production of the 'Vagina Monologues' by Eve Ensler celebrates 16 years in El Paso on February 24th, 2017 at Touch Bar & Nightclub (800 E. San Antonio Avenue) and February 25th and 26th at the Hyatt Place Hotel (6030 Gateway Blvd East).

Performances are Friday and Saturday at 8pm with a Sunday matinee at 2:30pm. 100% of the proceeds will be donated to a local non-profit in El Paso that raise awareness of violence against women and sexual assault. Here to tell us all about this year’s production of the Vagina Monologues is Alexander Wright. 

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Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

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Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos has resigned amid a social media backlash over comments he made that appeared to condone pedophilia.

In a news conference Tuesday, Yiannopoulos said his resignation was effective immediately and praised the website as "a significant factor in my success."

He also explained his views on sex with minors, insisting that he does not condone statutory rape.

Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET

A literary treasure buried for more than a century has been unearthed by Zachary Turpin, a grad student at the University of Houston.

Updated 9:35 p.m. ET

At times, it sprinted. At others, it stood still, seeming to weigh how best to elude New York City police. For more than an hour Tuesday, a runaway bull kept its dreams of freedom alive — until officers managed to capture it in Queens. And it got worse from there.

"It was at least the third loose cow or bull in Queens in the last 14 months," New York's Channel NBC 4 TV reports.

She's done it again.

Wisdom, a Laysan albatross thought to be at least 66 years old, has hatched yet another chick at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial in Hawaii.

Updated 5:25 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is releasing more on its plans to crack down on illegal immigration, enforcing the executive orders President Trump issued in late January. Those orders called for increased border security and stricter enforcement of immigration laws.

The Department of Homeland Security issued the new rules on Tuesday, laid out in two documents signed by Secretary John Kelly.

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Against a backdrop of turmoil and after big losses in November, the Democratic National Committee votes this week for its next leader. The winner of the DNC chair race will very likely reflect whether the committee's voting members think it prudent to align their party with the Hillary Clinton-Barack Obama camp, the Bernie Sanders camp — or neither.

President Trump's executive orders so far have targeted immigrants staying in the U.S. illegally, refugees, and visa holders from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

"It's a good assumption," Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said at the Munich Security Conference on Feb. 18, that green card holders — or legal permanent residents — will not be affected by the revised travel ban Trump is expected to announce this week.

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President Trump has refilled a key position in his administration. He's announced that Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster will serve as his national security adviser. Here's McMaster at Mar-a-Lago yesterday.

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The 114th North American International Toy Fair boosts a chance for industry players to see "hundreds of thousands of innovative new toys and games before they hit store shelves."

To attend the four-day event in New York City must be a lot like being a kid in a candy store — er — make that toy store.

At the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, hundreds of thousands of square feet are dedicated to the "hottest new toys and trends."

Health Insurance Woes Add To The Risky Business Of Farming

17 hours ago

There are many challenges to farming for a living: It's often grueling work that relies on unpredictable factors such as weather and global market prices. But one aspect that's often ignored is the cost of health care.

A University of Vermont researcher found that nationally, most farmers cited health care costs as a top concern.

Transitioning to adulthood isn't new, but there is a more modern way to describe it: adulting.

Get your car's oil changed? That's adulting. Cook dinner instead of order takeout? That's adulting.

And now a new school in Maine, called the Adulting School, is dedicated to teaching skills like these to fledgling adults so they can become successful grown-ups.

Copyright 2017 Classical New England. To see more, visit Classical New England.

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Now the story of how one Mexican artist is trying to revive Spanish-language bookstores here in the U.S. Simon Rios reports from member station WBUR in Boston.

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When the Academy Award nominations were announced in 2015 — and again in 2016 — there was swift backlash against the Academy for the lack of racial diversity among the nominees. Now, a new study of Best Picture nominees has revealed yet another demographic that's been chronically underrepresented in Hollywood — older people.

The human species is about to change dramatically. That's the argument Yuval Noah Harari makes in his new book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow.

Harari is a history professor at Hebrew University in Israel. He tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that he expects we will soon engineer our bodies and minds in the same way we now design products.


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On how we will begin to engineer bodies

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, as anti-communist sentiment gained ground in the United States, paranoia and persecution swept through Hollywood. The House Un-American Activities (HUAC) began interrogating some of the country's most talented filmmakers and actors, accusing them of being communists or communist sympathizers.

Saying that he's been diagnosed with the same condition that struck his mother and grandfather, singer David Cassidy has revealed that he is fighting dementia. The star whose career was launched by 1970s TV show The Partridge Family had recently told fans that he was on a farewell tour.

"I was in denial, but a part of me always knew this was coming," Cassidy, 66, tells People magazine, in an interview about his condition.

Oh, no! Trouble on the tracks! Christina Baker Kline's Orphan Train has collided with the circus caravan from Sara Gruen's Water for Elephants, and out of that wreck has come Pam Jenoff's The Orphan's Tale. The novel is a magical carnival saga, a bit grittier than either of its antecedents, and with more at stake.

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When you think of an old map or manuscript, you might picture something yellowed, tattered or even torn because of how long it's been around. But millions of historic documents, from presidential papers to personal slave journals are facing an issue apart from age: a preservation method that has backfired.

In a cold, white room on the first floor of South Carolina's state archives, a dehumidifier keeps a mass of old documents safe.

Americans are driving more than ever before, according to new data released today by the Federal Highway Administration.

Drivers in cars, trucks, minivans and SUVs put a record 3.22 trillion miles on the nation's roads last year, up 2.8 percent from 3.1 trillion miles in 2015.

With security at the U.S.-Mexico border at the center of a seething controversy, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed torn at oral arguments on Tuesday — torn between their sense of justice and legal rules that until now have protected U.S. Border Patrol agents from liability in cross-border shootings.

The Polish-born conductor and composer Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, who led the Minnesota Orchestra for nearly two decades and worked with that symphony for well over 50 years in total, died Tuesday at age 93.

When the Academy Award nominations were announced in 2015 — and again in 2016 — there was swift backlash against the Academy for the lack of racial diversity among the nominees. Now, a new study of Best Picture nominees has revealed yet another demographic that's been chronically underrepresented in Hollywood — older people.

The human species is about to change dramatically. That's the argument Yuval Noah Harari makes in his new book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow.

Harari is a history professor at Hebrew University in Israel. He tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that he expects we will soon engineer our bodies and minds in the same way we now design products.


Interview Highlights

On how we will begin to engineer bodies

The so-called Islamic State's financial fortunes are bound to the amount of territory it controls.

And the group's dramatic loss of ground in its strongholds in Syria and Iraq is putting pressure on its finances, according to a new report from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation.

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When President Trump has been given the opportunity to talk about anti-Semitism, he has sidestepped the issue multiple times until today, as NPR's Tamara Keith reports

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