KTEP - El Paso, Texas

KTEP Is Broadcasting On Low Power

KTEP is currently broadcasting on low power due to a major problem with our broadcast antenna. We are working as quickly as possible on having a tower crew inspect the antenna and initiate repairs. We apologize for the inconvenience and hope to return to full power as quickly as possible.

Read More

SPECIAL: Presidential Inauguration

KTEP together with NPR News will present Special Coverage of the Presidential Inauguration on Friday, January 20, 2017 beginning at 8am.

Read More

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Latest from KTEP

Dr. Tom Fullerton, professor of Economics in the College of Business Administration, shares El Paso's Borderplex Economic Outlook to 2018, as well as taking a look into what a Trump administration may mean to our economy.

Sunday January 22 at 2pm, El Paso Pro-Musica presents "Bach's Lunch." The broadcasts feature the special Noon Time Concerts offered each Thursday at Noon at the El Paso Museum of Art.

This week, Jerome Lowenthal and Michael Brown present an “Informance,” filled with Piano Excitement.

Poet Patrick Rosal joins host Daniel Chacón to discuss his latest book of poems "Brooklyn Antediluvian."

Good to Grow's very own Denise Rodriguez and Jan Petrzelka discuss gardening trends for 2017. 

One of the rising stars of the American winemaking industry is making his first visit to El Paso. André Hueston Mack was a sommelier at Thomas Keller’s renowned French Laundry in California’s Napa Valley and has been featured on ABC’s The Taste and CNBC’s Closing Bell on which he was called a “hero in the wine world.” 

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

A group of scientists is gathering today in the U.K. to discuss a slab of ice that's cracking in Antarctica. The crack could soon split off a frozen chunk the size of Delaware.

One glacier scientist, Heidi Sevestre, spent six weeks last year living on that giant slab of ice off the Antarctic Peninsula.

Just about one month ago, we invited you to write little commercials for all the joys in life that money can't buy. Tell us what makes you happy, we said — if you could sell us on it, we'd produce the ad and air it on All Things Considered.

My, how time flies.

Fleeing, unarmed people shot in the back. Mentally ill men and women, not suspected of any crime, stunned by a Taser while they lay on the ground. People already detained or incapacitated who were beaten, with police accounts falsely describing the force as necessary.

A 161-page report from the Justice Department details harrowing accounts of excessive force by the Chicago Police Department and highlights systemic failures that allow the violence to continue even as members of the public attempt to protest or report the brutality.

How much criticism can a single half-hour episode of television sustain before it gets the ax?

On Friday, we may have gotten our answer: An episode of the British comedy series Urban Myths — which drew widespread complaints for featuring the white actor Joseph Fiennes as Michael Jackson — has been canceled by Sky TV before it could air.

More News

NPR Politics

If you've ever visited the palm-lined neighborhoods of Beverly Hills, you've probably noticed that the rich and famous aren't the only ones drawn there.

Stargazers also flock to this exclusive enclave, seeking a chance to peer into — and fantasize about — the lives of movie stars and film directors.

Call it adulation, adoration, idolization: we humans are fascinated by glamour and power.

Copyright 2017 Montana Public Radio. To see more, visit Montana Public Radio.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As President Obama's national security adviser, Susan Rice has grappled with with multiple crises — wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the rise of the Islamic State, and cyber attacks blamed on China and Russia.

Rice, who served as Obama's United Nations ambassador during his first term, says there have been many successes over the past eight years. But she says her biggest disappointment has been the failure of the international community to stop Syria's brutal civil war.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Prosecutors in South Korea have requested an arrest warrant for the de facto head of the nation's biggest conglomerate, Samsung, on charges of bribery and embezzlement in connection with a swirling scandal that led to the president's impeachment.

Every child wants to grow up to be independent — to leave their parents' home, find work, build a life of their own.

But that seemingly simple step into adulthood can be a monumental challenge for children with developmental disabilities like autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, or any of a range of other such disabilities that affect about one in six American children, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

President-elect Trump told a press conference Wednesday that he would step back from running his company to prevent possible conflicts of interest once he's in office. To help prove it, he said he had just rejected a $2 billion deal to develop a golf course in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, adding that he wasn't required to do so because he isn't bound by any conflict-of-interest laws once he's president.

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A Wanderluster And A Wandering Eye

Jan 15, 2017

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

After its nearly century and a half run, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus plans to shut down "The Greatest Show On Earth."

The historic American spectacle will deliver its final show in May, says Kenneth Feld, the chairman and CEO of Feld Entertainment, the producer of Ringling.

Feld announced the news on the company website Saturday night, citing declining ticket sales — which dipped even lower as the company retired its touring elephants.

For This Relationship, It's Judgment Day

Jan 14, 2017

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

More NPR Arts News

If you've ever visited the palm-lined neighborhoods of Beverly Hills, you've probably noticed that the rich and famous aren't the only ones drawn there.

Stargazers also flock to this exclusive enclave, seeking a chance to peer into — and fantasize about — the lives of movie stars and film directors.

Call it adulation, adoration, idolization: we humans are fascinated by glamour and power.

Dr. Tom Fullerton, professor of Economics in the College of Business Administration, shares El Paso's Borderplex Economic Outlook to 2018, as well as taking a look into what a Trump administration may mean to our economy.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A Clown Says Farewell To The Circus

5 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Montana Public Radio. To see more, visit Montana Public Radio.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Dar al-Hijrah mosque in Northern Virginia has seen its share of attention. Two of the hijackers in the Sept. 11 attacks prayed there, and jihadi propagandist Anwar al-Awlaki served as an imam at the mosque before heading off to Yemen to join al-Qaida.

Now, with a U.S. president-elect who has suggested he will take a hard line with Muslim-Americans, the worshipers at Dar al-Hijrah again are bracing for scrutiny and looking for reassurance.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Pages