KTEP - El Paso, Texas

FOCUS ON CAMPUS: Randi Zuckerberg

Dr. Ezra Cappel of the Inter-American Jewish Studies Program at UTEP stops by to discuss the program and the upcoming guest speaker they are hosting, Randi Zuckerburg. Randi is an emmy nominted author and pioneer of facebook's early marketing intitaives. She is also Mark Zuckerburg's sister. Randi will be discussing the role of media in our everyday lives plus will be participating in a book signing. The event is Tuesday, February 21, 2017. Aired Feb. 17, 2017

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Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

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People who can learn in groups can do better than those individually, that is the driving concept behind Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL). This week on Science Studio Dr. Pratibha Varma-Nelson, a world authority in the concept of PLTL, discusses the importance of PLTL and how it functions. 

http://pltlis.org/recognition-of-dr-pratibha-varma-nelson/

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

Dr. Nigel Hamilton is a historian and author of various biographies including biographies of President John F Kennedy and President Bill Clinton. On this episode of Perspectives Dr. Hamilton discusses his latest book "Commander in Chief: FDR's Battle with Churchill 1943". This most recent book is part two of the trilogy, "FDR at War". 

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

Ocean Vuong is a poetry phenomena. His first and only book, thus far, titled  "Night Sky with Exit Wounds" is a poetry best seller.  Vuong joins host Daniel Chacón to discuss his book, his upcoming writing projects and his creative process.

http://www.oceanvuong.com/ 

Aired. Feb 19, 2017

One year ago, The Desert Triangle Carpeta brought together artists from the entire southwest to share their love of printmaking with the region. This year, they will continue to showcase excellent printmakers from Mexico City, Oaxaca, San Antonio and El Paso, during their Postre Prints show at the Purple Gallery in downtown El Paso. 

The annual V-Day El Paso production of the 'Vagina Monologues' by Eve Ensler celebrates 16 years in El Paso on February 24th, 2017 at Touch Bar & Nightclub (800 E. San Antonio Avenue) and February 25th and 26th at the Hyatt Place Hotel (6030 Gateway Blvd East).

Performances are Friday and Saturday at 8pm with a Sunday matinee at 2:30pm. 100% of the proceeds will be donated to a local non-profit in El Paso that raise awareness of violence against women and sexual assault. Here to tell us all about this year’s production of the Vagina Monologues is Alexander Wright. 

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To paraphrase an age-old saying: If at first you don't succeed, well, dust off the historic launch pad and try another liftoff.

Astronomers are offering the general public a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: the chance to discover a new planet in our solar system.

Many astronomers now think there may be a massive, undiscovered planet lurking in the far reaches of our solar system. Right now, however, the existence of this planet is theoretical. So the hunt is on to actually capture an image of it.

Miffy the rabbit seems quite simple. Two black dots for eyes, a sideways X for a mouth, a body inked in gentle curves — the artistry of Dick Bruna's creation rests precisely in its apparent artlessness. And in the six decades since Miffy was first put to page, Bruna's venerable rabbit has earned the affection of young fans worldwide, the admiration of art critics and even an entire museum in her honor.

It's been a long week. Take a moment — or even a minute! — to watch something beautiful.

A federal appeals court says doctors in Florida must be allowed to discuss guns with their patients, striking down portions of a Florida law that restricts what physicians can say to patients about firearm ownership.

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What a week it was for Donald Trump.

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We're going to talk now to a Republican congressman in South Carolina who held his own town hall yesterday. Mark Sanford, formerly Governor Sanford, represents the state's 1st Congressional District, and he joins us now on the line.

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The chief of Facebook made an ambitious announcement last week, though it would have been easy to miss. It came Thursday afternoon — about the same time that President Trump held his news conference. While the reality-TV icon is a genius at capturing our attention, the technology leader's words may prove to be more relevant to our lives, and more radical.

This is a two-part story on immigrants and small town viability. Part one aired on this Weekend Edition Saturday. For the full story, listen to both audio segments.

Like thousands of rural towns across the country, Cawker City, Kan., was built for bygone time.

Resident Linda Clover has spent most of her life in Cawker City, and she loves the place, but it's a shell of the town it used to be.

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The generation that pioneered organic farming is beginning to retire. These farmers want what they've built to last. Some growers are passing on their farms to their kids. But not all of them have a second generation who wants to take over the family farm.

That's what longtime organic growers Tom and Denesse Willey discovered when they decided over the past few years that it was time to retire. When the Willeys asked their kids if they wanted to take over their 75-acre farm in California's Central Valley, they all said "no."

The burger place downtown? Check. The Ethiopian restaurant we visited that one time? Check. The sports bar near school we've been meaning to try? Maybe tonight is the night.

To help users keep track of points of interest, Google Maps is rolling out a new feature — for both Android and iOS devices — to create lists of locations and share them with friends.

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So Much Anxiety Over Sibling Rivalry

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Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

Today the Sugars hear from a woman who is thinking about having a second child, but terrified of the idea that the children could be cruel to each other.

If Hacksaw Ridge breaks Kevin O'Connell's Oscars losing streak, he'll have a pile of acceptance speeches to choose from. Over the years, he's earned 21 Academy Award nominations for sound mixing, but doesn't have a single statue to show for it.

Most of his unused acceptance speeches are sitting in a drawer. "I don't pay much attention to that stuff anymore," O'Connell says. "I almost feel like this is like a rebirth for me at this point, you know?"

O'Connell's a re-recording mixer — he brings sound into movies.

On Saturdays, Jim Stokes searches for typefaces.

And on the floors of parking lots, the displays in antique stores and the dust jackets of his modest 4,000 book science-fiction collection, he finds them.

Then, he waits until Sunday to post them on Twitter.

If you added up all the time Nora Roberts has spent just in the No. 1 spot of the New York Times best-seller list, she would clock in at more than four years. She's had 198 books on the list in total — both romance novels and thrillers.

Roberts sometimes publishes under the name JD Robb, so we've decided to ask her three questions about another, somewhat less prolific JD — J.D. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye.

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On the day before President Trump's inauguration, the outgoing Obama administration passed a last-minute directive, banning the use of lead ammunition and fishing sinkers on federal land.

Recently, the deteriorating health of a bald eagle showed the effects of lead poisoning. Obama's regulation is intended to protect wildlife from exactly that.

But hunters are hoping Trump will soon overturn it.

Last week, an officer from the Pennsylvania Game Commission brought a bald eagle to the Carbon County Environmental Education Center in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

People who can learn in groups can do better than those individually, that is the driving concept behind Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL). This week on Science Studio Dr. Pratibha Varma-Nelson, a world authority in the concept of PLTL, discusses the importance of PLTL and how it functions. 

http://pltlis.org/recognition-of-dr-pratibha-varma-nelson/

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

Rio de Janeiro's carnival is like one of those lavish parties where all the guests show up early and start guzzling away while you're still upstairs, trimming your eyebrows.

Is there another city on earth that tosses aside its troubles with such gusto, and then dives into the dressing-up box with all the wild-eyed relish of The Cat in the Hat?

The carnival hasn't even officially opened, but this weekend several hundred thousand people were already out parading and partying beneath a steaming tropical sun.

If you are a fan of sketch comedy, then you'd probably know the name Jordan Peele. He, along with Keegan Michael Key wrote and performed in the acclaimed Comedy Central sketch series Key & Peele. The show, which ran for five seasons, earned a Peabody Award and two Primetime Emmys for its hilarious and deeply pointed take on race and culture.

A popular feature among the sketches on Key & Peele was the way it sometimes mixed humor and horror, for example, the zombies who refused to eat black people.

Growing up on Long Island, Zachary Linderer was obsessed with science.

He grew up a Jehovah's Witness, and like many others in the faith, he was homeschooled his whole life. By the time he got to high school, Linderer knew that he wanted to go to college for something in the sciences: physics, oceanography, something in that realm. But he realized at a young age that wasn't going to be a possibility.

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