KTEP - El Paso, Texas

El Paso Pro-Musica Bach's Lunch

Join KTEP Sunday January 21, 2018 at 2pm for the El Paso Pro-Musica Bach's Lunch concert featuring guitarist Jason Vieaux and Yolanda Kondonassis on harp.

The performance was recorded on January 11, 2018 at the El Paso Museum of Art.

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Last month, President Trump announced that the U.S. will be moving its embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The decision was received with various emotions across the world and this week, we speak with Rabbi Stephen Leon, of Congregation B'nai Zion, about what this decision means to Jewish communities on a global and local scale.

Though it may be a little too early in the season to stop and "smell the roses," it is certainly the perfect time to prune your roses in order to see some beautiful blooms come the spring. As a bonus, Good to Grow hosts share details on where you can go to get hands-on experience. 

Photographer turned City Representative for District 1, Peter Svarzbein discusses life as a working artist turned politician or, how to make your entire city an art project.

Part 2 of our interview with photographer and City Representative Peter Svarzbein.

In Hollywood, the road to the Oscar's is paved with a growing number of film critic and industry award ceremonies, lists, and galas. Russ Simmons, fellow member of the Broadcast Film Critics Association, speaks with host Charles Horak about the winners as well as their time together last week at the 23rd Annual Critics' Choice Awards.

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Put away the soy sauce and wasabi and get ready to be grossed out.

A Fresno man and avid lover of sushi — more specifically, salmon sashimi — pulled a 5 1/2 foot-long tapeworm out his own body. It had been growing inside of him for some time.

Dr. Kenny Banh recounted the gruesome story as a guest on a recent episode of "This Won't Hurt A Bit," a medical podcast that dissects odd or unusual health cases with experts.

Las Vegas police say they don't know what drove a man to rain gunfire on some 22,000 music fans at an outdoor concert last October, an attack that killed 58 people. In an update on the case Friday, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo said there are no signs anyone helped the gunman.

The lack of a motive and any other suspects persisted despite looking into nearly 2,000 leads and sifting through thousands of hours of video, according to Lombardo, citing a preliminary investigation report that was released by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department on Friday (see it below).

Carl Higbie, who was appointed by President Trump to serve in the federal agency that runs AmeriCorps and other volunteer service programs, has resigned his high-level post and apologized after a report emerged quoting racist and anti-Muslim remarks he made in 2013.

The global approval rating for U.S. leadership now stands at 30 percent — lower in President Trump's first year in office than it was under former President George W. Bush, according to the Gallup World Poll. The image of America's leadership now trails both Germany and China, Gallup says.

International regard for U.S. leadership fell sharply from the 48 percent approval rating for 2016, former President Barack Obama's last year in office. The previous low of 34 percent was reached at the end of the Bush administration.

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Going to turn now to NPR's Ron Elving. Ron, thanks very much for being with us.

RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Scott.

SIMON: You heard Democratic Senator Van Hollen. We had Republican Congressman Cole. What points do they make that stand up for you?

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Even before the clock struck midnight and the government shut down, the fingerpointing had begun. Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma described it on our program this way.

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Over President Trump's first year in office, the U.S. underwent some changes that he would probably cheer. The economy continued strengthening (including, yes, the stock market, as the president likes to emphasize) and the number of people apprehended while trying to enter the country illegally fell sharply. However, some changes are less promising: The nation's carbon dioxide emissions rose, and the amount of student debt grew by $47 billion.

We have put together a wide variety of statistics to show how the U.S. has changed in the past year.

Before Donald Trump took the oath of office one year ago, the presidency was widely seen as an all-consuming, full-time job.

Facebook is rolling out a major change to its News Feed: pushing up news articles that come from "high quality" sources, and pushing down the others. The move signals that, in an effort to combat the problem of fake news, the social media giant is willing to play a kind of editorial role — making decisions based on substance, not just how viral a headline may be.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a post to his Facebook page:

Jurors in eastern Canada on Friday found three men not guilty of criminal negligence following an oil train disaster that left 47 people dead. The accident in July 2013 involved a U.S.-owned train carrying North Dakota crude oil. In the aftermath, regulators in the U.S. and Canada adopted sweeping reforms to the way railroads haul and manage hazardous cargoes.

Last June the price of oil was $44 a barrel. Then, it started climbing. Earlier this week, it briefly hit $70.

The price of oil is a big deal. It affects how much you pay for heating, or a gallon of gas, or a flight home.

The price of oil is also famously volatile, and in the last six or seven years it's taken an incredible ride. On today's show, we tell the story of what happened and try to figure out what it means for the future of oil prices.

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Al Roker may be the most famous weatherman in the country, doing forecasts on the Today show since 1996, but he's much more than that — he's an author and game-show host and face of the Thanksgiving Day Parade. He even got the first interview with newly sworn-in President Barack Obama simply by yelling at him.

Violent crime is down in America's big cities.

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Take a little Hitchcock and a touch of Gone Girl. Add in a mysterious author and rumors of a very big price tag. Stir them all together and you come up with a rare bird: A debut novel that hits number one on the New York Times bestseller list in its first week on the market.

It's New York City in 1896. Young boys are being brutally murdered, and a team of outsiders assembles to hunt down the killer. On that team is a doctor with some unconventional views, a newspaper illustrator haunted by his past, and a police secretary who upsets the status quo: Miss Sara Howard, who's played by Dakota Fanning in the new television series, The Alienist.

Nobody ever wrote like Denis Johnson. Nobody ever came close. The author of books like Jesus' Son and Tree of Smoke was a hardcore minimalist who could say in one sentence what other writers wouldn't be able to say in a whole chapter. His stories and novels embraced the dark, but reluctantly; he refused to shy away from the brutal, the violent and the desperate. He was the last of his breed, and it was a breed of one.

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Determined to not let the momentum die, protesters once again converged on hundreds of cities — at home and abroad — for the second annual Women's March, seeking not only to unite in a call for social change but also to channel their fury into voter action.

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