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STATE OF THE ARTS: Artist Tino Ortega

Tino Ortega is an El Paso artists that combines elements of street and fine art to create colorful works of art. It could be said that the self taught artist creates a series of smaller paintings to make up a large image.

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University of Vermont

Julia Perdrial is an assistant professor of geochemistry at the University of Vermont. As an environmental bio-geochemist and mineralogist, she takes a strong interdisciplinary approach to study low temperature environmental terrestrial and aquatic processes by combining experimental and field approaches. The aim of her research is to understand how the geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere interact to shape the Earth’s terrestrial surface, now often termed the Critical Zone. This Critical Zone can be thought of as the skin of the earth: the terrestrial surface spans from the top of the canopy down to the bedrock - including groundwater - and provides us with water, nutrients and many other ecosystem services.

J.L. Powers is the award-winning author of three young adult novels, The Confessional, This Thing Called the Future, and Amina. She works as an editor/publicist for Cinco Puntos Press, and teaches creative writing, literature, and composition at Skyline College in California’s Bay Area. M.A. Powers has a PhD in the oncological sciences from the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He is currently a stay-at-home dad and lives in Maine. Broken Circle is his first novel written and the first novel the siblings have written together. 

Artist Humberto Hernandez known as DECK has tirelessly been working on a unique and distinct style for years.  For his first solo exhibition at Dream Chasers Club, titled DEConstruction, he chose to focus on abstract pieces.

DECstruction is a project created to show the correlation between color, shapes and lines. 

Artist Diego Martinez, best known for his “Robot” paintings, was born and raised on the El Paso/Juarez border.  His work features bright colors and is based on random thoughts and emotions that he’s feeling, or metaphors depicting a personal experience or tribulation he’s gone through.

Don't get caught up in the weeds! Take action now to control your winter weeds and your garden will thank you come the spring. Proper identification and timing are the keys to effective weed control, and Good to Grow hosts are here to help.

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In 1984, two men were thinking a lot about the Internet. One of them invented it. The other is an artist who would see its impact on society with uncanny prescience.

First is the man often called "the father of the Internet," Vint Cerf. Between the early 1970s and early '80s, he led a team of scientists supported by research from the Defense Department.

Initially, Cerf was trying to create an Internet through which scientists and academics from all over the world could share data and research.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It was Saturday afternoon, and Abigail Spanberger was in a busy hallway at the Chesterfield County Public Library in Midlothian, Virginia, minutes away from training a room of about 40 campaign volunteers. She seemed ready for a quick interview, but then abruptly called out to her campaign manager.

"Hey Dana, Eileen Davis is about to come through. Can you head her off at the pass so she doesn't interrupt the-"

She cut herself off and turned to me.

"That's my mother," Spanberger laughed.

Her mom is volunteering for her campaign?

"Evidently."

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