World News

Asia
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Captain, 2 Crew Members Arrested In S. Korea Ferry Sinking

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Wade Goodwyn. Scott Simon is away. It's been four days since a ferry capsized off the coast of South Korea. Two hundred and seventy passengers are missing, most are high school students. After days of rough seas, divers have finally made it inside the submerged ship. NPR's Anthony Kuhn was with family members this morning and joins us now from the capital, Seoul. Good morning, Anthony.

ANTHONY KUHN, BYLINE: Hello there, Wade.

GOODWYN: Divers are inside the ship. What have they found?

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Bringing Poetry And High Culture To Sao Paulo's Periphery

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

Sao Paulo is one of the biggest cities in the world and one of the economic engines of South America. Its center is known for its fancy malls, posh departments and even helicopter landing pads. The outlying areas where the vast majority of the workforce live are known for poverty and crime, less often for poetry and high culture. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports on efforts to change that.

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Parallels
5:13 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

A Journey Of Pain And Beauty: On Becoming Transgender In India

Abhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: "I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly."
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:25 am

The signs came early that Abhina Aher was different.

Born a boy biologically and given the male name Abhijit, Aher grew up in a middle-class neighborhood of Mumbai, India. The son of a single mother who nurtured a love of dance, Aher would watch enthralled as she performed.

"I used to love to wear the clothes that my mother used to wear — her jewelry, her makeup," Aher, now 37, recalls. "That is something which used to extremely fascinate me."

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It's All Politics
4:31 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Are Democrats Trying To Energize The Base With The Race Card?

Attorney General Eric Holder (right) recently expressed outrage at the treatment President Obama and he have received from conservatives. He stopped just short of saying it was race-related, leaving that for the African-American audience at the recent National Action Network convention to decide.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:46 pm

Few mixtures in American life are more emotionally combustible than the one formed by the combination of politics and race.

That helps explain why Democrats, in general, and President Obama, in particular, have tended to steer clear of overtly raising race as an issue to explain some of the opposition to Obama's presidency and agenda.

There seems to be a shift in recent days, however.

Top Democratic party officials have either directly or indirectly blamed race for some of the hostility to Obama, his policies, or both.

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Africa
3:42 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Somalis In Kenya Are Used To Raids, But They Say This Was Different

Kenyan security officers rounded up people Friday as part of a crackdown that has swept up thousands of undocumented refugees, immigrants and Kenyan citizens of Somali descent in recent weeks.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 6:12 pm

Mohammed Ali Isaac's hands shook as he showed his Kenyan ID to the police officers. They let him pass, but his cousins weren't so lucky. The two women had forgotten their IDs at home, and the police were threatening to load them into one of three large trucks they'd brought for the purpose.

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News
2:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Disaster On Everest Marks Deadliest Day In Mountain's History

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Just ahead of peak climbing season on Mount Everest, tragedy has struck once again. At least 12 local climbers are dead and several more or missing after a massive avalanche this morning. The climbers, Nepalese Sherpas, were setting up ropes along a dangerous stretch of slope used by adventure tourism companies. This is looking to be the deadliest day in Mount Everest's history and the worst accident since 1996 when eight climbers died in a blizzard.

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World
2:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Leaflets Given To Donetsk Jews Made Waves Worldwide, But Not In Donetsk

An anti-fascist sign hangs on the barricade outside an occupied government building in Donetsk.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

A development in Eastern Ukraine has set social media on fire and triggered outrage around the world.

In the city of Donetsk, someone distributed fliers ordering Jews to register with the separatists who have taken over government buildings.

Even though nobody in Ukraine believed the leaflet was real, the fliers hit a nerve.

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The Salt
2:03 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Like Ham? There's A Festival For That In French Basque Country

Visitors look at Bayonne hams displayed on the first day of the yearly ham fair.
Gaizka Iroz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 3:52 pm

In Bayonne, they take their ham very, very seriously.

This medieval fortress of a town is minutes from the French seaside ports of Barritz and St. Jean de Luz, and not far from Spain's St. Sebastian. It has reigned as a cultural and commercial center for a millennium, according to historian Mark Kurlansky in The Basque History of the World.

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World
1:56 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Captains Uncourageous: Abandoning Ship Long Seen As A Crime

The Costa Concordia ran aground off the Italian coast in 2012, killing 32 people. Its captain was accused of manslaughter and abandoning the 4,200 passengers and crew on the night of the wreck.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:30 pm

Cowardice comes in many forms, but there's a special sense of shame reserved for captains who abandon ship.

South Korean authorities have arrested Capt. Lee Jun-Seok, who was one of the first to flee from the ferry as it sank on Wednesday.

"I can't lift my face before the passengers and family members of those missing," Lee told reporters.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Japan Says It Will Temporarily Scale Back Whale Hunt

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi speaks in Tokyo on Friday. He says Japan will cut back on the number of whales it kills this year, but resume previous levels in 2015.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 1:12 pm

Japan says it will kill fewer whales when its seasonal Pacific hunt begins next week and will only observe whales in the Antarctic, after a U.N. court ordered it to stop taking the marine mammals from the Southern Ocean.

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Faith Matters
9:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea?

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Speaking of religion still, if there's one thing that goes hand-in-hand with faith, it is generally food. There have been a number of different food shortages in this country you may have heard about lately. We reported on this program about the shortage of limes. We've seen reports of rising beef prices as well. But right now, during Passover, gefilte fish is in short supply. Matt Chaban joins us now from member station WESA in Pittsburgh. He wrote about this for the New York Times. Matt, welcome.

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Faith Matters
9:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we turn to a campaign to recognize Muslim religious holidays in the New York public school system. Roughly 10 percent of New York City's public school children are Muslims. And their parents are asking that schools close for the most sacred Muslim holidays. They argue that Christian and Jewish students get their most important holidays off already. Current New York Mayor Bill de Blasio endorsed the idea during his campaign. Take a listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN)

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The Two-Way
5:06 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Captain Of Korean Ferry Arrested As Vessel Sinks Below Surface

Cranes, ships and other rescue equipment are on the scene off the southern coast of South Korea, where a ferry capsized Wednesday. About 270 people, most of them high school students, remain missing.
Kim Hong-Ji Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:28 pm

The captain of the South Korean ferry that sank earlier this week in the Yellow Sea, leaving at least 28 dead and hundreds missing, has been arrested, along with two other crew members, South Korea's Yonhap news agency says.

The 69-year-old captain, Lee Jun-Seok, faces five counts including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law, Yonhap says.

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Europe
4:32 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Ukraine Dominates Putin's Yearly Call-In TV Show

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

As talks over the future of Ukraine were going on yesterday in Geneva, President Vladimir Putin was talking to the Russian people in his yearly television call-in show. It was over before an agreement was reached in Geneva between Ukraine and Russia, but Putin's comments gave us a sense of how hard it might be to get Russia to keep its part of the deal.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports.

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Around the Nation
4:28 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Immigrants Feel Like Targets As Deportations Increase

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:29 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Europe
3:14 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Deal To Ease Ukraine Crisis Delays New Sanctions On Russia

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Many Sunken Ferry Victims Believed To Be Trapped Below Deck

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Colombia Mourns Death Of Favorite Son: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

If you think about the country of Columbia, you might think about turmoil - drug trafficking and violence - but a native son countered those notions with dream-like, whimsical storytelling. Nobel Prize-winning author, Gabriel Garcia Marquez died yesterday at the age of 87. Juan Forero visited his hometown.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Inmates To Be Moved Temporarily Out Of Infamous Iraqi Prison

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

And I'm Kelly McEvers. It's a name that conjures up grim images. Abu Ghraib prison. Once the site of prisoner abuse and torture, first under Saddam Hussein then under U.S. occupation, the prison temporarily closed this week. The decision comes as a Sunni-led insurgency in Western Iraq, near Abu Ghraib, is targeting Iraq's Shiite-led government in Baghdad.

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Parallels
1:33 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Sunni Discontent Fuels Growing Violence In Iraq's Anbar Province

Iraqi Sunni masked protesters burn tires to block the main highway to Jordan and Syria, outside Fallujah, Iraq, on Dec. 30. Violence has returned to Iraq's Anbar province, with discontented ordinary Sunnis joining forces with al-Qaida-linked militants battling the Iraqi government.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Violence has reignited in western Iraq, with Islamist fighters taking over much of Anbar province three months ago. A renegade al-Qaida group has set up its headquarters in Fallujah — the city where hundreds of U.S. soldiers died a decade ago, trying to wrest it from insurgent control.

But this time, the enemy isn't the U.S. and it's not just extremists fighting. Ordinary Sunnis in Anbar, furious at what they call years of discrimination by the Shiite-dominated government, have joined the militants' battle against the Iraqi army.

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Even Chimps Know That A Firm Bed Makes For Quality Sleep

A chimpanzee hangs from a tree trunk in Kibale National Park in Uganda. A new study indicates that chimps prefer a specific tree for sleeping.
James Akena Reuters/Landov

In the wilds of Africa, chimpanzees consistently choose to make their sleeping nests in a particular tree that offers the "just right" kind of comfort that Goldilocks famously preferred.

That's according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE that could also bolster a theory that solid shut-eye may have been a key to human evolution.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Nobel Prize-Winning Author Gabriel Garcia Marquez Dies At 87

Nobel literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez greets fans and reporters outside his home in Mexico City on March 6, his birthday.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 4:55 pm

Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez, author of One Hundred Years of Solitude, has died in Mexico City. He was 87.

The Associated Press says:

"Garcia Marquez's magical realist novels and short stories exposed tens of millions of readers to Latin America's passion, superstition, violence and inequality.

"Widely considered the most popular Spanish-language writer since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century, Garcia Marquez achieved literary celebrity that spawned comparisons to Mark Twain and Charles Dickens.

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Europe
2:23 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

On Russian Call-in Show, Putin Maintains Hard Line Against West

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin says he hopes he won't have to move troops into Ukraine to protect the local Russian-speaking population, but he reserves the right to do so. He made the comments on a televised call-in show.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Europe
2:23 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Why Israel Is Staying On The Sidelines In Ukraine Crisis

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Russian President Vladimir Putin this week to talk about Ukraine. Israel has stayed neutral on the crisis there. And last month, they did not show up to vote on a U.N. resolution, backed by the U.S., that condemned Russia's actions in Ukraine.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports from Jerusalem, Israel sees reasons to stay on Moscow's good side.

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News
2:23 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Search Continues For Nearly 300 Missing In South Korea Ferry Accident

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

The search continues for survivors and answers in the South Korean ferry disaster. NPR's Anthony Kuhn offers details on the latest developments.

Europe
2:23 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Opposing Protests Pull Eastern Ukraine In Two Directions

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The deal struck in Geneva today aims to end the violence Ukraine has seen over the last few months. There were snipers shooting at protesters in Kiev's Independence Square. In eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists forced their way through police barricades to overtake government buildings. But not every protest has been violent. Today, people who oppose the separatists staged a demonstration in the city of Donetsk, and NPR's Ari Shapiro was there.

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News
2:23 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Out Of A Tough Day Of Diplomacy, A Surprising Deal On Ukraine

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

A deal now that could possibly ease the tensions in eastern Ukraine. The U.S., Europe, Russia and Ukraine came to an agreement that calls on multinational monitors to oversee steps to restore order. The deal would likely delay any new sanctions against Russia. President Obama has already cast doubt on whether the Russian's will cooperate. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has more.

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The Salt
12:59 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Chili Say What? Linguistics Help Pinpoint Pepper's Origins

New research has traced chili peppers back to their origin in eastern Mexico.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:29 pm

Count us among those who just can't get enough chili pepper news.

These spicy fruits are beloved around the world for their ability to sex up nearly any cuisine. They're the world's most widely grown spice crop, so it's hard to imagine that their reach was once limited to the early farmers in what is now eastern Mexico.

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Law
9:39 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Do America's Deportation Policies Work?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 10:38 am

Guest Host Celeste Headlee learns more about the United States' deportation policies from Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute.

Law
9:38 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 10:38 am

Howard Dean Bailey made a good life for himself in the U.S. But then, a decades-old run-in with the law led to his deportation. Does his story show the system failing or working?

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