World News

Education
9:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Educating Girls: Big Payoff For $45 A Year

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:37 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. That's since the militant Islamic organization Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of schoolgirls on April 15. Professed to be against Western education, Boko Haram took the girls away from their books and their teachers and have threatened to sell them as wives and slaves.

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Turkish Mine Explosion: Angry Protests As Death Toll Rises

People dig graves Thursday for miners who died in an explosion in Soma, Turkey. Anger over what's being called the deadliest industrial accident in the country's history has set off protests nationwide.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:42 am

The death toll in the coal mine explosion in Turkey keeps rising, and anger over the incident has spread around the country. Thousands of people staged protests after a speech from Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan in which he suggested such accidents are unavoidable.

Officials say at least 282 mine workers have died in the incident in the city of Soma. That figure seems certain to rise, as about 100 people are still missing. The mine explosion is already being called the deadliest industrial disaster in Turkey's history.

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Asia
3:30 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Thai Economy May Become Victim Of Political Unrest

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:55 am

The political crisis in Thailand has escalated since the country's top constitutional court ousted Yingluck Shinawatra as prime minister. Amid political deadlock, there are fears of economic disaster.

Europe
3:15 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Past Disasters Haunt Modern-Day Coal Mining Accidents

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:55 am

More than 280 miners have died in Turkey with another 150 still missing. It's hard to imagine how so many can perish in a mine accident in modern times.

NPR Story
3:12 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Dozens Of Protesters Picked Up Ahead Of Tiananmen Anniversary

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:55 am

Chinese authorities have arrested or detained dozens of people ahead of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown. This is an annual ritual ahead of a sensitive political date in China.

Law
1:04 am
Thu May 15, 2014

U.S. Border Patrol's Response To Violence In Question

Patrolling the U.S.-Mexico border can be dangerous. Still, critics say there isn't enough public accountability when Border Patrol agents use deadly force.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:55 am

Picnickers in a riverside park in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, react in horror as a man in a yellow baseball cap named Guillermo Arevalo lies on the bank of the Rio Grande, bleeding to death.

It's a warm Monday evening in September 2012. He has just been shot by an agent on a U.S. Border Patrol airboat on the river. The Border Patrol says the agent shot at rock throwers and that the incident is under investigation.

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The Two-Way
6:59 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Two Dead Following Attacks On Anti-Government Protesters In Bangkok

An anti-government protester waves the Thai flag during a rally in Bangkok, on Wednesday.
Vincent Thian AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:46 am

An attack on anti-government protesters in Thailand's capital, Bangkok, has left at least two people dead and more than 20 wounded, Thai authorities say.

The incident marks renewed violence between supporters and opponents of ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who was removed from her post last week by the country's Constitutional Court along with nine of her Cabinet ministers. Her Pheu Thai party, however, remains in power.

The Associated Press writes:

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The Two-Way
6:55 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Hagel: U.S. Drones Searching For Kidnapped Nigerian Schoolgirls

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks during a news conference after attending the Gulf Cooperation Council meeting in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, on Wednesday. Hagel confirmed that the U.S. was using drones to search for 270 kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls.
Mandel Ngan AP

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said Wednesday that the U.S. is using surveillance drones to try to locate more than 270 kidnapped schoolgirls in Nigeria.

"We are now providing unmanned reconnaissance intelligence over Nigeria and we'll continue to do that," Hagel told reporters in Saudi Arabia at a meeting of the Gulf Cooperation Council.

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Parallels
4:30 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

After Referendum In Eastern Ukraine, Different Visions Emerge

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station on May 11 in Hartsizk, Ukraine. Pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence after the referendum in cities across eastern Ukraine.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:59 pm

In eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence based on a victory in a hastily organized referendum. Now, they're resisting a nationwide presidential election that's scheduled for May 25.

With Russian troops still massed near the border, Ukrainian and international mediators are trying to find a solution for the crisis.

There are some very different visions of the future for the volatile region.

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Parallels
2:19 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Russia's Energy Giant Turns Up The Heat On Ukraine

A monument to Ukrainian writer Taras Shevchenko is silhouetted against a sign advertising Russia's natural gas giant Gazprom in Moscow. Gazprom has dramatically increased the price it charges Ukraine in recent months.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:59 pm

If Russia was aiming to target one of Ukraine's vulnerabilities, natural gas would be the bull's-eye. Ukraine gets about 60 percent of its gas from Russia.

Clifford Gaddy, a Russia specialist at the Brookings Institution, says as the dispute between the two countries grows, Moscow is more willing to use natural gas as a weapon.

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Middle East
2:00 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

In Wake Of Turkey Coal Mine Explosion, Anger Turns On Prime Minister

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

MELLISA BLOCK, HOST:

Protests broke out today in Istanbul, Ankara and in the western Turkish town of Soma, a day after an explosion and fire at a coal mine there killed at least 274 miners. Many more remain unaccounted for.

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Middle East
2:00 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

To Make It Stateside, Gaza Strip Exports Must Pass Israeli Obstacles

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

People living in cities in the Northeast may find mint, chives and basil in their grocery stores that have been grown in the Gaza Strip. Despite tight Israeli restrictions on exports from the impoverished Palestinian enclave, Gazan farmers have started building a U.S. market.

But as NPR's Emily Harris reports, the obstacles to building a real export economy are hard to overcome.

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Unrest Breaks Out In Vietnam Over Island Dispute With China

A Taiwanese bicycle factory in Ho Chi Minh City burns after mobs angered over Chinese moves in the South China Sea mistakenly targeted the facility, thinking it was Chinese owned.
Jeff Nesmith AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 2:34 pm

Mobs in southern Vietnam — angered by China's placement of an oil rig in disputed Southeast Asian waters — have torched scores of foreign-owned factories. Meanwhile, Beijing has reportedly begun construction on an airstrip in an island chain also claimed by the Philippines.

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The Salt
11:22 am
Wed May 14, 2014

For The Win(e): U.S. Passes France As World's Top Wine Consumer

Yeah, Americans drank way more than that.
Erik Schelzig AP

We don't typically pity the French, what with their pantries full of fine cheese, meats and wine.

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Parallels
10:41 am
Wed May 14, 2014

In Tragic Twist To Poignant Tale, Oscar-Winning Director Commits Suicide

Swedish filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul spent four years and all his money making the documentary Searching for Sugar Man, about an American singer who was famous in South Africa for decades but didn't know it. The film won an Oscar last year. Bendjelloul, 36, was found dead in Sweden on Tuesday.
Anders Wiklund AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:53 pm

Swedish director Malik Bendjelloul spent several years and all his money to make a moving documentary about an American singer, Sixto Rodriguez, who was unknown in the U.S. yet somehow became a legend in South Africa.

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Shots - Health News
8:39 am
Wed May 14, 2014

MERS 101: What We Do (And Don't) Know About The Virus

Fear of MERS is prompting Saudis to wear mouth and nose masks, like this man on the street of the Red Sea coastal city of Jeddah on April 27.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 9:43 am

The virus with the mysterious name has been making headlines this spring, with a mysterious increase in cases. Here's an update on what we know about MERS.

What is it? Middle East respiratory syndrome, a new and potentially fatally virus from the same family as the common cold and severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS).

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Shots - Health News
7:54 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Doctors Debate Whether Screening For Domestic Abuse Helps Stop It

In the U.S., doctors increasingly ask about domestic violence as a routine part of checkups.
iStockphoto

Domestic violence affects a third of women worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. In many cases nobody knows of the suffering, and victims aren't able to get help in time.

That's why in many countries, including the U.S., there's been a push to make screening for domestic violence a routine part of doctor visits. Last year, the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended that clinicians ask all women of childbearing age whether they're being abused.

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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Wed May 14, 2014

'I'm Happy,' Says Man Whose Case Changed Europe's Rules For Google

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:25 pm

The Spanish man whose court battle against Google resulted in a European court ruling in his favor – and for the "right to be forgotten" – says he is pleased with the case's outcome.

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The Two-Way
5:13 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Death Toll Nears 285 In Turkish Coal Mine Explosion

Rescue workers carry a man from the coal mine in Soma, western Turkey, site of a disaster that has killed 245 people.
Emrah Gurel AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:08 am

This post was updated at 4:00 a.m. ET Thursday:

The death toll in Turkey's worst mining disaster has risen to 282. Rescue teams recovered eight more bodies on Thursday. Hope is fading for the estimated 150 miners trapped below ground.

This post was updated at 7:10 p.m. ET.:

Crowds angered over a mine explosion in western Turkey that claimed at least 274 lives clashed with police on Wednesday near the site of the disaster in Soma.

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Asia
4:30 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Rioters In Vietnam Trash Foreign-Owned Factories

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's something you do not often see in a country as tightly controlled as Vietnam. Thousands of rioters have been trashing factories that they believed were owned by Chinese companies in Vietnam. The rioting follows China's move to plant an oil rig off Vietnam's coast. It's in the South China Sea in waters claimed by both countries. Chris Brummitt is in Vietnam's capital, Hanoi. He's the Associated Press Southeast Asia news editor and he's on the line. Welcome to the program.

CHRIS BRUMMITT: Hi. Good morning.

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World
4:19 am
Wed May 14, 2014

International Aviation Group Says Plane Tracking Is A Priority

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:28 am

The U.N. organization that oversees aviation is taking a big step toward requiring global satellite tracking of all commercial flights. The move follows the disappearance of a Malaysian Airlines jet.

Around the Nation
3:27 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Wrong Turn, Guns In His Truck, Lands Veteran In Mexican Jail

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:30 am

A former U.S. Marine sergeant is in a Mexican prison just across the border from California. The reservist says he missed his freeway exit in San Diego and drove across the U.S.-Mexico border.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Documentary Explores Nuclear Deal With Iran

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The U.S. and Iran are holding nuclear talks, following up on a tentative agreement. A Web documentary examines how they got this far. It shows diplomats talking in private while thinking of their respective publics. Secretary of State John Kerry recalls protest when President Obama spoke with Iran's president.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed May 14, 2014

2007 Ban On Gaza Strip Exports Hurts Palestinian Welfare

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 5:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Never mind the search for Mideast peace, this is a story of Mid East produce. Agricultural products are the biggest export from the Gaza Strip, but none of it is sold in Israel or even the Palestinian West Bank. NPR's Emily Harris asked why.

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Parallels
1:45 am
Wed May 14, 2014

China Puts Brass On Trial In Fight Against Military Corruption

Chinese sailors stand guard on China's first aircraft carrier as it travels toward a military base in Hainan province. China has been waging a public crackdown on military corruption, perhaps the largest such campaign in more than six decades of communist rule.
China Stringer Network Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 6:04 am

China's ongoing crackdown on military corruption may be the toughest — or at least best publicized — in more than six decades of communist rule. Some top brass are on trial, and teams of inspectors have fanned in search of graft.

But all of that may seem like a distant light at the end of a long tunnel for former navy captain Tan Linshu. Tan and his wife have lived in a tiny, subterranean room for two years as they search for justice in a case that suggests what the crackdown is up against.

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The Two-Way
6:46 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Oscar-Winning Director Malik Bendjelloul Dies At 36

An Aug. 20, 2012 photo of documentary filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul. Police in Sweden say the director behind the Oscar-awarded music documentary Searching for Sugar Man, died on Tuesday.
Anders Wiklund AP

Swedish director Malik Bendjelloul, who won an Oscar last year for his 2012 documentary Searching for Sugar Man, has been found dead in Stockholm at age 36, police and family members confirm.

Reuters reports:

"Stockholm police declined to provide any further details about Bendjelloul's death."

"'What I can say is that there are no suspicions any crime was involved,' Stockholm police duty officer Pia Glenvik said.

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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Obama Sanctions Individuals In Central African Republic

A former Seleka soldier stands in the ruins of a mosque, which residents say was attacked and burned by anti-Balaka militiamen, about 16 miles from Bambari.
Siegfried Modola Reuters/Landov

President Obama has issued an executive order authorizing sanctions against five people in the Central African Republican in connection with the country's sectarian conflict.

In a statement, the White House cited "[escalating] violence and human rights abuses," and noted that "[communities] that have lived together peacefully for generations are being torn apart along sectarian lines."

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Planet Money
3:04 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

In Somalia, Collecting People For Profit

Adad Hassan Jimali stands next to a sign for her private camp for displaced persons. The camp, which is in Mogadishu, Somalia, is called Nasiib Camp.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 4:28 am

Last year I took a drive through the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia, in a bulletproof SUV. My seatmate was Justin Brady, who at the time was working for the U.N. We were both wearing body armor — standard issue for these trips — and we were followed by a second car with more guys with guns.

Coordinating humanitarian aid can be an incredibly risky job in Somalia, where Islamist militants al-Shabab have declared open season on any Westerner or anyone accused of working with the so-called Western occupier.

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Shots - Health News
2:38 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Gene Sequencing Could One Day Make Malaria Easier To Treat

A health official takes a blood sample from a child's finger for a malaria test at a clinic in Bong Ti Lang village on the Thai-Myanmar border.
Narong Sangnak EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:30 pm

Malaria has proved one of the hardest diseases on the planet to treat. The World Health Organization estimates there are nearly 200 million cases each year, and the parasitic infection is blamed for some 700,000 deaths annually.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Russia Aborts Rocket Engine Sales, GPS Cooperation With U.S.

Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Antares rocket lifts off at Wallops Island, Va., in April of last year. The Antares uses a pair of Russian-made NK-33 rocket engines that Moscow says it will stop supplying for military launches.
Steve Helber AP

In a tit-for-tat sanctions dispute over the situation in Ukraine, a top Russian official said Tuesday that Moscow would stop supplying the U.S. with rocket engines used in military satellite launches and suspend operation of GPS ground stations in Russian territory.

The moves come after Washington banned some high-tech equipment sales to Russia as part of sanctions in response to the annexation of Crimea.

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