World News

The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Thailand's Military Ruler Says No Elections For At Least A Year

An anti-coup demonstrator in Bangkok, earlier this week. The country's new military leader says those opposed to the putsch lack an understanding of democracy.
Sakchai Lalit AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 4:02 pm

The leader of Thailand's military junta said it could take a year or more before new elections in the country, as he repeated warnings to protesters opposing last week's coup, saying they lack a "true understanding of democracy."

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Shots - Health News
10:02 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Dengue Fever 101: How Serious Is This Disease?

Kevin Flores, 11, remains under a mosquito net while being treated for dengue fever at La Mascota hospital in Managua, Nicaragua, last fall.
Inti Ocon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 1:56 pm

The painful disease has been around for centuries but began a dramatic upswing in the 1980s. In the Americas alone, the annual number of cases has boomed from 520,000 in 2003 to 2.3 million in 2013. With the World Cup coming up in mid-June, host country Brazil is frantically battling the mosquitoes that carry dengue (pronounced DENG-gey).

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Europe
5:21 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Rare Right-Wing Party Favors EU Integration, Joining Nato

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Europe's far-right parties did well, really well in last week's elections to the European Parliament. But their embrace of Russia and its annexation of Crimea is not exactly what the far-right counterparts in Ukraine were expecting. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports on a rare right-wing party that favors EU integration and joining NATO.

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Asia
4:19 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Terror Attacks In China Take An Alarming Turn

Smoke rises from Tiananmen Square in Beijing on Oct. 28, when three Uighurs, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority, drove a jeep into a crowd there, killing two tourists. The people inside the car died as well, after they set their vehicle on fire.
STR Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:39 pm

China has suffered small-scale terror attacks in the past that often targeted local government in out-of-the-way cities. In the past year, though, the attacks have taken an alarming turn.

Ethnic militants have gone after civilians outside their homeland and employed a relatively new tactic: suicide.

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Africa
4:08 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Political Chaos Reigns 3 Years After Moammar Gadhafi's Ouster

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 1:16 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. We are reminded this morning of how difficult the transitions have been in the countries of the Arab Spring. Egypt has had a coup. Serious bloody civil war carries on. And in Libya, two men now claim to be the rightful prime minister. One is a businessman elected by parliament earlier this month with the backing of Islamists.

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NPR Story
3:11 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Sen. Corker Wants More Lasting Show Of Force In Eastern Europe

Republican Sen. Bob Corker, the ranking member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, says he thinks President Obama hasn't responded strongly enough to the crises in Ukraine and Syria.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 11:10 am

Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, had tough words following President Obama's West Point speech and NPR interview about foreign policy goals.

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NPR Story
3:11 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Will The U.S. Arm Syrian Rebels?

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:36 am

There was some anticipation this week that President Obama might endorse stronger measures to give training to Syria's rebels. The president told NPR the rebels might be better able to use U.S. aid.

NPR Story
3:11 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Colombian Rebel Group Becomes World's Oldest Guerrilla Army

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In May of 1964, a Marxist militant group called the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, began its fight to overthrow the Columbian government. Fifty years later, despite ongoing peace talks that fight continues, making FARC the worlds oldest guerilla army. John Otis reports.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Spanish spoken).

JOHN OTIS, BYLINE: Here in the southern Colombia town of Uribe, army troops salute their officers. This region is a long-time rebel stronghold, so everyone is on high alert.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD)

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Shots - Health News
5:20 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

No Hunch Here: Richard III Suffered From Scoliosis Instead

Portrait of King Richard III.
Getty Images/The Bridgeman Art Library

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:03 pm

Shakespeare calls Richard III "rudely stamp'd," with the king's "hunchbacked" form revealing the twisted soul within. Actors have reveled in playing the monarch as a limping, deformed creature with a withered arm.

But when the bones of the 15th century king were unearthed from beneath a British parking lot in 2012, the skeleton showed no evidence of a hunch. Instead, the vertebrae lay in a curve suggesting that Richard might have had scoliosis.

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The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Husband Of Woman Beaten, Shot To Death In Pakistan Killed First Wife

Mohammad Iqbal sits beside the body of his wife, Farzana, after she was stoned to death earlier this week by her family for marrying against their wishes. Iqbal has since admitted that he killed his first wife in order to remarry.
Rahat Dar EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 9:20 am

A man whose pregnant wife was stoned to death by angry relatives in Pakistan earlier this week has admitted that he killed his first wife so he could remarry.

It's a disturbing twist to the already disturbing story that we reported on Tuesday of 25-year-old Farzana Parveen, who was bludgeoned to death with bricks by her family after she eloped with Mohammad Iqbal instead of marrying a cousin as her family demanded.

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Shots - Health News
2:57 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever.
Friedemann Vogel Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:11 pm

In Sao Paulo's poor north zone, in the neighborhood of Tucuruvi, teams of city workers knock on doors, warning people to take pets and small children out of the area.

Quickly after, men in hazmat suits with metal cylinders strapped to their backs start spraying the street, and some of the interiors of the homes, with powerful pesticides. This is the front line of the war on dengue fever in Brazil's largest city.

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World
2:54 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Pakistani Woman Beaten To Death By Her Family As Police Stand By

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 9:16 am

Pakistan is reeling from the latest so-called "honor killing." A pregnant woman was stoned to death just feet from a courthouse for marrying a man against her family's wishes. Police stood by as family members, including a woman, took part in the killing.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Animals
2:35 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Scientists Find Africa's Longest Land Migration: Zebras' 350-Mile Trek

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:11 pm

Wildlife biologists have discovered the longest known terrestrial migration in Africa: some 350 miles across southern Africa by huge herds of zebras. Large mammal migration in Africa has generally been hindered by the subdivision and fencing of land. However, this one remains possible because it takes place in a unique, multi-country wildlife corridor.

Afghanistan
2:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Initial Afghan Elections Went Well, But Worries Rise For Round Two

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Afghanistan, campaigning is underway for that country's presidential runoff election. Two candidates are competing to succeed President Hamid Karzai. And the vote is set for June 14. The first round was largely considered a success - with less violence and fraud than expected. And voter turnout exceeded expectations. But as NPR's Sean Carberry reports, there are growing concerns that the second round could be a far messier affair.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

ASHRAF GHANI: (Speaking foreign language).

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World
2:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Insurgents In Ukraine Shoot Down Helicopter, Killing General

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The battle for control of eastern Ukraine heated up again today. Pro-Russian insurgents shot down a military helicopter - killing at least a dozen soldiers, including an Army general. The deaths came days after the Ukrainian military inflicted heavy losses on rebels, who had seized the Donetsk airport.

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Economy
2:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Germany's Economy Is Doing Well — And That's Bad For The Eurozone

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: Germany's economy is having a pretty good year so far. Manufacturing is high, unemployment is low. The economy is expanding, and yet the strangest report has recently come out of Europe. It says all of that success is actually a problem for the rest of the Eurozone. Zoe Chase of our Planet Money team wondered why Germany's success isn't considered a good thing.

ZOE CHASE, BYLINE: Germany's got a thing about making stuff the world wants.

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The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Pope Invites Israeli, Palestinian Leaders For Joint Prayer Session

Pope Francis prays during a visit to the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, in Jerusalem's Old City, earlier this week. While in the Holy Land, the pontiff extended an invitation to the presidents of Israel and the Palestinian Authority to join a prayer meeting at the Vatican.
Debbie Hill UPI/Landov

Pope Francis is hoping to demonstrate the power of prayer next week when Israeli President Shimon Peres and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas join the pontiff at the Vatican for an exercise in peace building.

Reuters describes his invitation to the two leaders to join him at the Vatican for a joint prayer meeting as one of the "boldest political gestures" for Francis since he became pope in March 2013.

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Parallels
12:58 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

No Surprise Here: Sisi Rolls To Victory In Egypt's Election

Less than a year after a coup, Egypt's Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has won the country's presidential election with more than 90 percent of the vote. Election monitors widely criticized the way the election campaign was handled.
Jim Watson AP

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 3:58 am

It was never in doubt, but now it's official. Ex-military chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi will be Egypt's president after nearly a year of being the nation's de facto leader.

He won by a landslide with more than 93 percent of the vote, according to a preliminary results. His victory was so sweeping that his lone opponent, Hamdeen Sabbahy, came in third with just 3 percent of the vote. People who voided their ballots in protest outnumbered those who voted for Sabbahy.

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Parallels
11:40 am
Thu May 29, 2014

U.S. Teacher: I Did 7 Months Of Forced Labor In A Chinese Jail

Foster worked as a sociology professor at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in southern China for a total of five years before he was charged with theft and sent to jail.
Courtesy of Stuart Foster

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 4:28 am

Prisoner 1741 spent more than seven months inside a jail in southern China, assembling Christmas lights for export to America. Work days stretched up to 10 hours and conditions were tough, he says. One boss used strands of Christmas lights to whip workers and drive production.

Stories about forced labor have trickled out of China over the years, but what makes Prisoner 1741's so remarkable is that he isn't Chinese. He's American. In fact, he's a middle-aged, American sociology professor from South Carolina.

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Parallels
10:29 am
Thu May 29, 2014

With Swift, Quiet Moves, Nigerian Group Limits Religious Violence

A man cleans up the site of Tuesday's car bomb explosion in Jos, Nigeria, on Thursday. The city was spared deadly reprisals, in part because a peace group intervened.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 8:20 am

The city of Jos sits on an invisible fault line between Nigeria's mostly Christian south and its largely Muslim north. Its population is almost 50-50 Muslim-Christian.

So it's not surprising that twin car bombs in a crowded downtown vegetable market on May 20 killed both Christians and Muslims. Most of the 133 victims were women, and 25 were children.

But that could have been only the beginning of the killing, as was the case in the past.

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The Two-Way
5:10 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Search For Flight MH370 Black Boxes Ends; 'Pings' In Dispute

The Australian ship Ocean Shield, seen here earlier this month, has been ordered back to its dock, after a search for the black boxes of a missing Malaysian airliner ended without finding anything.
Paul Kane Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 12:02 pm

The underwater search for black boxes from a missing Malaysian Airlines jet has ended, as the robotic sub that searched nearly 330 square miles of the ocean hasn't found anything to back the idea that "pings" detected in that area came from emergency equipment.

Search and salvage teams will now assess where they should look next for the jet's remains, after Australia's Joint Agency Coordination Center said that "no signs of aircraft debris have been found" by the American Bluefin-21 robotic sub.

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Middle East
3:50 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Human Rights Watch Finds Evidence Of Chlorine Bombs In Syria

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:33 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's turn to Syria now. Despite the chaos in that country's civil war, international weapons inspectors are still on the ground investigating reports of chemical weapons used by the government. A team of those inspectors was briefly kidnapped earlier this week.

One question is whether the Syrian government used chlorine in several recent attacks. The advocacy group, Human Rights Watch, has been interviewing physicians who treated some of the victims. We spoke to the group's deputy director for the Middle East, Nadim Houry.

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It's All Politics
7:03 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

10 Thoughts On Obama's West Point Policy Address

In his commencement address to the Military Academy at West Point Wednesday, President Obama condemned isolationism but spent more time outlining the hazards of intervention.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:34 pm

President Obama gave the graduation speech Wednesday at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, using the occasion to describe "the next phase" of the U.S. war against terrorism and his ideas about national defense and foreign policy in general. Here are a few general impressions.

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

American Said To Have Carried Out Suicide Bombing In Syria

Photo reportedly of Abu Hurayra al-Amriki (Abu Hurayra the American), an American said to have participated in a recent suicide truck bombing in Syria.
Twitter

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 6:31 pm

U.S. officials are investigating claims circulated on social media sites that an American fighting with Syria's rebels helped carry out a suicide truck bombing in the war-torn country over the weekend.

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

America's Strength Extends Beyond Its Military, Obama Says

President Obama delivers the commencement address to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point's Class of 2014, in West Point, N.Y., on Wednesday.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:34 am

American leadership in the 21st century will be defined in part by the nation's military strength, "but only in part," President Obama said in a wide-ranging interview with NPR about his foreign policy priorities.

Echoing themes he expressed during a speech Wednesday to West Point graduates, Obama emphasized the importance of international norms and alliances in addressing challenges such as Russia, China and Syria.

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Shots - Health News
3:44 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

A Cholera Vaccine Halts New Cases In A Guinea Epidemic

A woman in Guinea takes her first dose of the two-stage vaccine Shanchol during the country's 2012 epidemic.
David Di Lorenzo/Courtesy of MSF

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 3:54 pm

There's new evidence that an oral cholera vaccine might help stop an epidemic in its tracks.

That's the encouraging message from a study that tested a two-dose vaccine during a 2012 outbreak in Guinea. The virus was 86 percent effective in preventing immediate infection of a scourge that afflicts up to five million people a year and kills around 120,000.

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The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Pakistani Taliban Reportedly Split Over 'Un-Islamic' Practices

Pakistani Taliban patrol in their stronghold of Shawal in the Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan, in 2012. The organization has reportedly split over disagreements about tactics.
Ishtiaq Mahsud AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 4:08 pm

An internal rift within the Pakistani Taliban over tactics one faction says are "un-Islamic" has erupted into a full split, one of the factional leaders said Wednesday.

The apparent split comes after months of fighting among the factions that killed dozens of fighters from the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan, or TTP.

The BBC says:

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Shots - Health News
2:39 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Thriving Towns In East Africa Are Good News For A Parasitic Worm

Fishermen drag a net in Lake Malawi in 2012. About the size of New Jersey, the lake is home to hundreds of fish species and is considered one of the most biologically diverse lakes in the world.
Ding Haitao Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 4:17 pm

People trying to grow food and support their families on the shores of Lake Malawi are not only causing serious environmental problems, they're also causing a surge in a debilitating disease.

Thriving towns along the lake are changing the ecosystem in ways that are allowing a parasitic worm to flourish, researchers reported last week in the journal Trends in Parasitology.

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Middle East
2:39 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Force And Fear In The Air, As Syrian Refugees Go To Polls In Lebanon

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 2:02 pm

Syrian refugees in Lebanon are casting their votes ahead of Syria's presidential election next week. The election is seen as Bashar Assad's rigged bid for legitimacy — but many refugees believe that if they don't vote, they'll never be allowed back home.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Two-Way
1:09 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

55 Convicted In Public Trial In China's Northwest

Trucks packed with criminals and suspects at a mass sentencing rally at a stadium in Yili, in Xinjiang province, on Tuesday.
China Stringer Network Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 1:35 pm

In a mass trial before thousands of onlookers at a sports stadium, authorities in China's northwestern Xinjiang province convicted and sentenced 55 people on charges of terrorism, separatism and murder, state media report.

The scene, reminiscent of the communist Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and '70s, took place before a crowd of 7,000 spectators. All of the defendants appeared to be from the region's Muslim Uighur community, the BBC says.

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