World News

World
4:24 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

Africa Trip Is Obama's Pitch To Broaden Relationships

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For more about the president's upcoming trip to Africa, NPR's Africa correspondent Gregory Warner joins us from Nairobi. Hi, Gregory.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, as we heard Mara say, this is the trip of the first African-American president to Africa. He'll be visiting Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania. Why those three countries?

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

Hospitalized Nelson Mandela In Critical Condition

A print of Nelson Mandela and get well messages lay outside the home of the former President Mandela in Johannesburg, South Africa earlier this month.
Themba Hadebe Associated Press

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:54 am

Nelson Mandela, the former South African president and anti-apartheid leader, is in critical condition in a hospital in Pretoria where he was admitted two weeks ago with a recurring respiratory infection.

A statement from South African President Jacob Zuma said the 94-year-old Mandela's condition had become critical over the past 24 hours.

"The doctors are doing everything possible to get his condition to improve and are ensuring that Madiba is well-looked after and is comfortable. He is in good hands," said Zuma, referring to Mandela by his clan name.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

Malaysia Declares Emergency From Cross-Border Blanket Of Smoke

The landmark Petronas Twin Towers (top, right) in the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur, are barely visible amid the thick smoke. It's even worse farther south.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:55 am

Malaysia has declared a state of emergency in the country's south after choking smog from slash-and-burn agriculture in neighboring Indonesia enveloped the region.

Residents in Muar and Ledang districts of Johor state have been told to stay indoors. This comes after a similar order in Singapore last week.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Sun June 23, 2013

Pakistan Gunmen Kill Foreign Climbers In Brazen Attack

A 2003 photograph of majestic Nanga Parbat, one of a number of 8,000-plus-meter peaks that attract the most adventurous Himalayan mountaineers.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:05 am

(This story was last updated at 10:40 a.m. ET)

Armed assailants attacked a hotel at a Himalayan base camp in Pakistan, gunning down nine foreign climbers and a local guide as the group prepared for an ascent of one of the world's tallest peaks.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports that Ukrainians and Chinese climbers, as well as a Pakistani guide, were killed in the attack at 26,246-foot Nanga Parbat, about 150 miles northeast of Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

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The Two-Way
5:56 am
Sun June 23, 2013

Ecuador Says NSA Leaker Has Asked For Asylum

A TV screen shows a news report of Edward Snowden at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Sunday.
Vincent Yu Associated Press

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 3:20 pm

(This story was last updated at 5:17 p.m. ET)

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor accused of leaking classified surveillance information, has asked Ecuador for asylum, the country's foreign minister says.

Snowden left Hong Kong earlier Sunday bound for a "third country," the government in the Asian hub said. He later landed in Moscow.

Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino Aroca, who is on an official visit to Vietnam, said:

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Parallels
12:54 am
Sun June 23, 2013

Concrete Floors! No Working Toilet! Just $200K In Shanghai

Apartments, apartments, everywhere; nor any flat to buy: Survey after survey reveals that young Chinese are stressed out — and skyrocketing property prices are one of the main reasons.
Zhuo Yang NPR

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 4:21 am

Every weekend, I rise at 7 a.m. to get on the subway to hunt for apartments. The cheapest two-bedroom homes in the suburbs of Shanghai cost $200,000 or more, which would take me more than 12 years to pay off — if I don't spend a dime of what I make.

This is the reality of China's boom. After decades of explosive growth, the cost of living in China's big cities has skyrocketed, and many young people have been priced out of the housing market.

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Asia
4:18 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

Philippines Pulverizes Ivory To Discourage Traffickers

A steamroller tries to flatten tusks, without much luck.
Simone Orendain

Poached ivory is destroying wild populations of elephants and rhinos across Africa and Asia. The strong demand for ivory takes an estimated 25,000 elephant lives each year.

Now, the government of the Philippines is sending a message to poachers and smugglers, by destroying five tons of ivory confiscated in the country. On Friday, environmentalists, government officials, and the public gathered in Quezon City to witness the pulverization.

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Music
4:18 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

'I'm So Excited': Pedro Almodovar's Spanish Metaphor

Spanish director Pedro Almodovar's new film is called I'm So Excited.
Juan Naharro Gimenez Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 6:29 am

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NPR Story
2:58 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

Brazil Protests Rage On, Despite Government Call For Change

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 4:18 pm

Host Jacki Lyden checks in with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro about the ongoing protests in Brazil. Despite comments of reassurance by the country's president Friday night, throngs of anti-government protesters continue to rally in cities across the country.

NPR Story
2:58 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

How To Protest Effectively

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 4:18 pm

From Turkey to Brazil, tens of thousands of protesters are trying to get their voices heard. But what makes an effective protest? Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Bibi van der Zee of The Guardian and author of The Protestor's Handbook about the history of protests and strategies demonstrators use to broadcast their cause.

The Two-Way
9:27 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Brazil's President Offers Carrot And Stick To Protesters

Students from the eastern city of Sao Paulo protest on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 12:16 pm

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has pledged a nationwide overhaul of public transportation, improved funding for schools and a crackdown on corruption in response to sometimes violent anti-government protests that have roiled the country for the past week.

In a 10-minute address broadcast on Friday, Rousseff broke her silence on the protests, saying she would spend more money on public transportation and divert some of the country's oil revenues to pay for education, The Associated Press reported. She also addressed widespread anger over government corruption.

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The Two-Way
6:55 am
Sat June 22, 2013

'Friends Of Syria' Countries Meet To Map Out Arming Rebels

Secretary of State John Kerry (front row, third from right) poses with foreign ministers of the "Friends of Syria" in Doha, Qatar.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 11:49 am

Update At 11:30 a.m. ET:

Secretary of State John Kerry called the current situation in Syria "unacceptable by anyone's standard" and lashed out at the government of President Bashar al-Assad for using Hezbollah in the fight against rebels.

"Assad chose to raise the stakes militarily," Kerry said. "He chose to attack the Syrian people, but this time using Iranian supporters and using Hezbollah, which is a terrorist organization.

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Latin America
6:28 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Brazil Protests Continue

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Asia
6:28 am
Sat June 22, 2013

India Revives An Ancient University

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Parallels
6:28 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Brazil's Indians Reclaim Land Citing Promises, Using Force

Indigenous leaders from Brazil's Terena tribe attend a meeting with government officials in the capital, Brasilia, on June 6. Brazil's Indians have been demanding greater land rights and are increasingly coming into conflict with large ranchers and farmers.
Eraldo Peres AP

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 7:59 pm

It was once the cattle farm of a former congressman, but now his stately house in the western Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul is a burned-out shell. Thatch huts are being built in the shade of flowering palm trees. Once the purview of one farmer's family, it now is occupied by dozens of indigenous ones.

Indian activists say this is just the beginning.

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Parallels
3:14 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Amid Ire At U.S., Germany Does Its Own Domestic Spying

Protesters display a cutout figure of President Obama in Berlin on Wednesday. Germans were protesting the National Security Agency's eavesdropping on foreign communication.
Gero Breloer AP

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 2:26 pm

Revelations of widespread U.S. spying on foreign Internet communications put a damper on President Obama's first state visit to Berlin. The German chancellor and other officials there say they want to know more about what the National Security Agency is looking at.

Yet the backlash has been more muted than expected. One reason is that the German government is doing similar surveillance.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Report: U.K. Spy Agency Taps Trans-Atlantic Fiber Optic Cables

The drip-drip of classified information has now moved overseas: Citing more classified documents leaked by Edward Snowden, The Guardian newspaper reports that the British spy agency taps into trans-Atlantic fiber optic cables, sucking up vast amounts of data that includes communication sent by Americans and Britons.

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The Salt
11:29 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Mastering A Sea Monster: From Greece, A Lesson In Grilling Octopus

For octopus flesh to be tender enough to grill, it must be dried in the sun at least one full day.
Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 1:09 pm

The Greeks have been eating octopus since ancient times, and it's still on the menu of the country's many psarotavernes, or fish taverns.

On the islands, where the catch is often fresh, octopus is grilled over charcoal, seasoned with fresh lemon and served with ouzo. Friends and families often share this special summer meze during a hot day at the beach.

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NPR Story
9:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

A Calculating Win for China's New Supercomputer

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Every six months, one of my next guests ranks the 500 fastest computers in the world, the supercomputers, and back in November 2010, China took number one for the first time with a supercomputer called Milky Way 1. President Obama acknowledged China's feat in his State of the Union address a few months later and said we were facing a Sputnik moment.

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The Two-Way
7:02 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Flooding Forces 100,000 From Their Homes In Calgary, Canada

Houses damaged along the edge of Cougar Creek in Canmore, Canada. Widespread flooding caused by torrential rains washed out bridges and roads prompting the evacuation of thousands on Thursday.
John Gibson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 8:55 am

Because of flooding that could prove historic, authorities in Calgary, Canada, have ordered 100,000 people in 22 communities across the city to evacuate their homes.

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Fri June 21, 2013

As Protests Grow, Brazilian President Calls Emergency Meeting

A demonstrator is shot by a rubber bullet as anti-riot police officers charge during a protest Thursday against corruption and price hikes in Rio de Janeiro.
Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:34 pm

By some estimates, about a million people marched in cities across Brazil on Thursday, airing a wide array of grievances. As O Globo frames it, it was a day marked by violent demonstrations, vandalism and intense clashes with military police.

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Middle East
2:45 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Can Iran's New President Resolve Nuclear Program Dispute?

Many are wondering whether Iran's newly elected president Hassan Rowhani will be able to change his nation's posture on nuclear enrichment and convince the West to end crippling economic sanctions. To find out, Steve Inskeep talks to Gary Samore, a former White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction.

Asia
2:40 am
Fri June 21, 2013

China's Credit Crunch Felt Across Financial Markets

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Alarm bells went off in China's financial system yesterday. That's because interest rates for loans that banks make to each other - like the loans we've just been hearing about - shot up, drying up credit as China's banks searched for cash. The effects reached markets here, where the Dow dropped more than 2 percent yesterday.

All of this seems to be caused by the Chinese government trying to send its banks a message. To explain what happened and why, we turn to NPR's correspondent in Shanghai, Frank Langfitt. Good morning.

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Latin America
2:34 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Protests In Brazil Gain Steam, Violence Increases

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Until recently, our correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro was posted in the Middle East. She was an eyewitness to the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt, Libya and elsewhere. Now, she is NPR's South America correspondent, based in Brazil. And guess what's happening on the streets there?

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Last night, demonstrators spread all across that country, with a total of a million people estimated to have taken part. Some protesters clashed with police. One was hit and killed by a car.

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Middle East
2:34 am
Fri June 21, 2013

2 Syrian Rebels Share Their Stories

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 4:53 am

U.S. and European officials meet on Saturday to decide how to increase their aid to the rebels in Syria. The U.S. is deepening its involvement in Syria's Civil War. Steve Inskeep, who recently was in Syria reporting for Morning Edition, has the story of two rebels.

Middle East
3:23 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Shiite Fighters Drawn To Fight In Syria By Islamic Prophecy

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 4:42 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

For the first time in modern history, Shiite fighters are crossing borders to wage jihad, much as Sunnis traveled to Afghanistan to fight the Soviets and to Iraq to fight Americans. These days, the draw is Syria. The cause is not a foreign invader but a rival sect. And some say, it's about fulfilling a thousand-year-old prophecy, as NPR's Kelly McEvers reports.

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Middle East
2:48 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Kerry Heads Back To Mideast To Reboot Peace Talks

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 7:28 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Tomorrow, Secretary of State John Kerry heads to the Middle East and South Asia. In a week's time, he'll be meeting with Jordanians, Palestinians and Israelis, hoping to advance the prospects for peace. Those prospects are not especially bright, even by the usual dim standards of Middle East diplomacy.

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Latin America
2:48 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Protests Spread Across Brazil And Take On New Life

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 4:42 pm

The protests that have erupted in Brazil are rooted in vast economic and social inequalities in the South American nation.

Parallels
12:34 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

What's In A Name? A Lot If You're A Country

Afghan President Hamid Karzai reportedly pulled his representatives out of planned peace talks because of the flag and the nameplate at the Taliban office in Doha, Qatar. Both were legacies of the time the Taliban ruled the country and illustrated how sensitive such symbols can be.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 1:35 pm

A flag and a nameplate: Those seemingly innocuous items were apparently the reason that Afghan President Hamid Karzai abruptly refused to participate in peace talks also involving the Taliban and the U.S.

The flag was the same white flag the Taliban used when they ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001. The nameplate bore the words "Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan," the name used by the old Taliban government.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Second Reported Miracle Paves Way For Pope John Paul's Sainthood

Cardinal Stanislav Dziwisz, archbishop of Krakow and former personal secretary of Pope John Paul II, prays in front of the late pope's tomb at St. Peter's Basilica in 2011, in Vatican City.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 12:53 pm

It's a miracle, though we're not quite sure of the details yet.

A Vatican official confirms that a committee of theologians has approved a second miracle attributed to Pope John Paul II's posthumous intercession — a sine qua non for sainthood.

Italian media say a Costa Rican woman was cured of a severe brain injury after her family prayed to the memory of the late pope. The Vatican is set to release details in the next week or so.

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