World News

Middle East
3:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Monday's Bloodshed Hardens Political Divisions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:50 am

Egypt's interim president, who was installed by a military coup last week, issued a plan calling for parliamentary elections next year and giving himself sweeping powers in the meantime. His move came hours after the deadliest clash yet between security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

NPR Story
2:58 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
1:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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Shots - Health News
1:37 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Treating The 'Body And Soul' In A Russian TB Prison

An inmate practices for the yearly talent show in the prison's concert hall. Such cultural activities are part of the hospital's treatment, which combines correction with education, medical and psychological therapy.
Konstantin Salomatin/for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:41 am

Igor Davydenko is rail-thin with dark circles under his eyes. He has a haunted look, reinforced by black prison overalls with reflective tape on the shoulders and cuffs.

Davydenko could be labeled as a loser in many ways. The 31-year-old is a drug addict, serving time for robbery and assault. He's serving his third stretch in a Siberian prison.

But Davydenko is about to become a winner in at least one way. If all goes well, he will soon be declared cured of one of the deadliest forms of tuberculosis.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Death Toll Rises To 13 In Quebec Train Explosion

The death toll has been raised to 13 in a freight train's derailment and explosion in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, this past weekend.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:50 am

Police in a small town in Quebec, Canada, where a runaway freight train holding crude oil caused a massive explosion, say they have found the bodies of eight more victims, bringing the death toll in Saturday's incident to 13. The authorities say dozens of people are still unaccounted for.

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World
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Crews Still Searching For Missing After Quebec Train Accident

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In rural eastern Quebec, crews are still searching for dozens of people still reported missing after a train carrying oil and derailed and erupted into a fiery ball on Saturday. Authorities have confirmed five deaths. The accident comes as more oil than ever is moving by railroad, and that's raising questions about safety.

NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Africa
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood Has Long History In Egypt

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Muslim Brotherhood is not a passing feature on the Egyptian scene. To get some sense of where it may be heading, we're going to hear now about where it's coming from. We called on Yasser El-Shimy, an Egypt Middle East analyst for the International Crisis Group, to give us some background on the group, beginning with the Brotherhood's founding in 1928 when Britain effectively controlled Egypt.

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Africa
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

At Least 50 Egyptians Killed In Bloody Clash

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Salt
2:35 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

France Battles Scourge Of Ready-To-Eat Meals In Restaurants

We're guessing microwavable, premade meals are not an issue in this kitchen, at the three-Michelin-star restaurant L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges near Lyon, France.
Laurent Cipriani AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:47 pm

France's vaunted culinary culture has been taking it on the chin lately.

First came the news, which we told you about in April, that the majority of France's restaurants are now fast-food joints.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Abundance Of Elephants Strains South African Game Reserves

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In many parts of Africa, elephants are threatened by poaching. But in South Africa, they're doing so well that some game reserves say they're overpopulated. Now, many of those reserves are trying to limit elephant reproduction even while some ecologists believe it's the wrong approach. Willow Belden reports.

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Parallels
1:43 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Pakistan: 'Collective Failure' Allowed Bin Laden To Hide

This undated image from video, seized from the walled compound of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, and released by the U.S. Department of Defense on May 7, 2011, shows bin Laden watching President Obama on television.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:22 am

The "collective failure" of Pakistan's military and spy authorities allowed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden to live in multiple places in the country for nearly a decade. That's the finding of a confidential Pakistani government report published Monday by Al Jazeera.

The 336-page report said officials in the Pakistani government, military, intelligence and security agencies did not know that bin Laden lived in the country.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Snowden: Americans Are Good; But Their Leaders Lie

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

When he went to work for the nation's spy agencies, "I believed in the goodness of what we were doing" and in the "nobility of our intentions to free oppressed people overseas," says the so-called NSA leaker, Edward Snowden, in a month-old video posted online Monday by The Guardian.

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Parallels
11:59 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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Parallels
10:15 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Britons Bask In A Summer Of Good News

Britain's Andy Murray celebrates after defeating Novak Djokovic of Serbia at Wimbledon on Sunday in London. Murray was the first British man to win Wimbledon in 77 years.
Mike Hewitt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:10 pm

All news is bad news. Or so the saying goes. Many Brits firmly believe this — and use it as a branch to beat their journalists, one of the more despised species in these isles.

It is, of course, untrue. There's no better example of the media's appetite for good news than the tsunami of euphoria with which they've greeted Andy Murray's Wimbledon triumph on Sunday.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

'Devastated' Quebec Town Waits For Word About Missing

Comforting each other: A group of young women in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, on Sunday. People there are waiting to hear the fate of 40 people still missing after Saturday's train derailment and the massive explosions that followed.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:53 pm

With 40 people still missing after massive explosions Saturday in the center of their town, the people of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, begin the week "with fears that the death toll from a weekend rail disaster could surge," CBC News writes.

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The Two-Way
4:39 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dozens Killed By Shots Fired At Pro-Morsi Gathering In Cairo

A wounded man is helped from the scene Monday in Cairo after shots were fired during a protest against the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohammed Saber EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:44 am

(This post was last updated at 5:45 p.m. ET.)

An already dangerous, volatile situation turned even deadlier early Monday in Cairo when dozens of people were killed at a protest outside the Republican Guard facility where it's believed ousted President Mohammed Morsi is being held. Most of those who died are reported to have been among a large group of Morsi's supporters.

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET. Date Set For Egypt's Election

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Middle East
3:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dozens Die In Clashes Outside Cairo's Republican Guard HQ

In Egypt, dozens of people were killed in a clash between protesters and security forces Monday morning. The Muslim Brotherhood says government forces fired on them. The military says the headquarters was stormed by protesters.

World
3:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Death Toll Expected To Go Higher In Canadian Train Disaster

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:47 am

At least five people have been killed in Canada, after a train carrying crude oil derailed in eastern Quebec on Saturday. Police say dozens of people have been reported missing. For more on the story, David Greene talks to Stephen Puddicombe, of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Russian Lawmaker: Venezuela May Be Last Chance For Snowden

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:57 pm

A prominent member of Russia's parliament is adding to pressure on former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to leave Russia.

AS NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, Alexei Pushkov, the head of the foreign affairs committee in Russia's parliament, said on Twitter that Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden, adding that this might be the 30-year-old computer analyst's last chance to receive asylum.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Deports Radical Cleric To Jordan

Muslim Cleric Abu Qatada arrives home after being released from prison in London on Nov. 13, 2012.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Britain has deported a radical Muslim cleric top his homeland, Jordan, where he appeared in court Sunday and was formally charged with terrorism-related offenses.

Abu Qatada was first arrested in Britain in 2001 over alleged terrorist links. He was rearrested in 2005.

The 53-year-old cleric was held at a prison in southeast London, and was taken from there to the airport at midnight Sunday. The BBC reports that he was accompanied on the flight by "six people from Jordan, comprising three security officials, a psychologist, a medical examiner and his Jordanian lawyer."

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Mob Brutally Kills Soccer Referee After Player Is Stabbed And Killed

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 11:25 am

Brazilian police have made an arrest in a grisly incident during a soccer match, in which a referee's leveling of a red card penalty set off a clash with a player that resulted in the player's death and ended with the official being brutally killed.

The killings occurred during an amateur game last Sunday, June 30, in Maranhão, a state in Brazil's northeast that is west of Recife.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Runaway Train Explosion Still Ablaze In Quebec

Firefighters douse flames after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Megantic in Canada's Quebec province on Saturday.
Francois Laplante-Delagrave AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:25 am

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Rivals Rally In Cairo As Egypt Uncertainty Continues

State media and other sources had confirmed Saturday that Mohamed ElBaradei, the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, would be Egypt's interim prime minister. Later in the day, the president's spokesperson walked it back.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:27 pm

(This story was last updated at 4:16 p.m. ET)

Egyptians remain deeply divided about which direction their country should go as supporters and opponents of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi are turning out Sunday to voice their opinions in separate rallies.

NPR's Greg Dixon filed this story for our Newscast Unit:

"Hundreds of thousands of opponents of deposed President Morsi have come here, Tahrir Square, in the center of Cairo to show their support for the toppling of his government.

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NPR Story
4:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Appears Ready to Approve New IVF Procedure

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 12:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Britain is the country where the first test tube baby was born. Now, the United Kingdom is considering another groundbreaking - and controversial - fertility procedure. The British government appears ready to legalize a process in which a baby is conceived with the genetic material from three people. The science goes like this. Inside every mother's egg cells are all of her genes. All her DNA is packed inside the nucleus. And when she has a child, her DNA gets passed down.

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NPR Story
4:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Ireland May Allow Limited Abortions

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 12:21 pm

Politicians in the Catholic Republic of Ireland have overwhelmingly voted to introduce abortion in cases where the woman's life is in danger or she is at risk of suicide. John Waters, columnist for the Irish Times, speaks with Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about this sensitive issue.

NPR Story
4:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Syrian Opposition Elects New Leader

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 12:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in the Middle East, turning out attention now to Syria, where the main opposition coalition has a new leader. During meetings in Istanbul, opposition leaders elected Ahmad al-Jarba, who has close ties to Saudi Arabia. The change comes as civilians in Syria's central city of Homs are facing a fierce government assault. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: After another two-day Syrian Coalition meeting had spilled over into a third day with more to come, spokesman Khaled Saleh had some news.

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NPR Story
4:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Will Egypt's Fragile Democracy Stick?

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 12:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Middle East
4:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Sexual Assaults Reportedly Rampant During Egypt Protests

The bridge leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo was quiet Saturday morning, but activists say more than 100 women were sexually assaulted during protests there last week.
Hiro Komae AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:31 pm

From afar, Tahrir Square appears almost festive as protesters chant against the Islamist president who was overthrown by the Egyptian military last week. But inside the crushing crowds, the scene can be a lot more sinister.

In a video posted by the Muslim Brotherhood, an unidentified woman cries out as men attack her. The group, from which former President Mohammed Morsi hails, claims the attack occurred in Tahrir Square in late June.

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The Salt
2:47 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

The Art Of Food: Museum Celebrates Iconic Catalan Chef's Cuisine

Catalan chef Ferran Adrià poses with plasticine models of his food on display at Somerset House in London. A new exhibit looks back at the influential modernist chef and his landmark restaurant, El Bulli.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images for Somerset House

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:20 am

The man once hailed as the "Salvador Dali of the kitchen" is getting his own art exhibit.

Ferran Adrià might not be a household name, but for nearly three decades, as chef and mastermind of the acclaimed Catalan Spanish restaurant El Bulli, he moussed, foamed and otherwise re-imagined cuisine in modernist ways that have inspired many of the world's top chefs.

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Developing: Boeing 777 Crashes At San Francisco International

Traffic backs up on Route 101 after the crash.
Sarah Rice Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 5:47 am

Two people died Saturday in the crash-landing at San Francisco International Airport of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 from Seoul, South Korea, San Francisco's fire chief says.

Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White says everyone who had been on board the flight is accounted for.

National Transportation Safety Board chairwoman Debbie Hersman said investigators were being deployed to the scene.

"Obviously, we have a lot of work to do," she said, noting that it was too early to tell what had caused the crash.

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