World News

The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

Prosecutor: Radical Islam Motivated Attack On French Soldier

A 2009 photo of the La Defense shopping mall, west of Paris, where Saturday's stabbing attack took place.
Jacques Brinon AP

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 3:12 pm

Police in France say that a 21-year-old Muslim convert who confessed to stabbing a French soldier was apparently motivated by his religious beliefs, in an eerie echo of an attack last week in London, in which a British serviceman was killed.

Pvt. Cedric Cordiez, 25, was approached from the back and stabbed in the neck at a shopping mall in a suburb of Paris on Saturday. He was treated at a military hospital and released on Monday, officials said.

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Business
2:11 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

Smithfield Deal Highlights China's Reliance On U.S. Farmers

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 5:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Smithfield Foods, one of the country's biggest meat producers is being sold to a Chinese company, the price $4.7 billion. If approved by regulators, this will be the biggest acquisition in history of a U.S. corporation by a Chinese company. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Parallels
1:52 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

In China, Customer Service And Efficiency Begin To Blossom

A couple waits for a high-speed train in the Chinese city of Qinhuangdao. Modern infrastructure and the expanding private sector have greatly increased efficiency and customer service in many parts of Chinese life.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 5:56 pm

China's infamous bureaucracy has bedeviled people for ages, but in recent years, daily life in some major Chinese cities has become far more efficient.

For instance, when I worked in Beijing in the 1990s, many reporters had drivers. It wasn't because they didn't drive, but because they needed someone to deal with China's crippling bureaucracy.

I had a man named Old Zhao, who would drive around for days to pay our office bills at various government utility offices. Zhao would sit in line for hours, often only to be abused by functionaries.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Drone Said To Have Killed Key Pakistani Taliban Commander

Waliur Rehman, who was reportedly killed Wednesday in Pakistan.
U.S. State Dept.

It's not confirmed that he's dead. But if a suspected U.S. drone strike on Wednesday did kill Waliur Rehman, as Pakistani officials say it did, then a top Pakistani Taliban commander with a $5 million price on his head has been taken off the battlefield.

According to the U.S. State Department's "rewards for justice" program:

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Books
9:26 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Chopra Brothers: Separate Paths But Common Bond

Brad Walker Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 12:43 pm

Deepak and Sanjiv Chopra both followed in their father's footsteps and became physicians. But while one chose Western medicine, the other took a spiritual approach. Now they've teamed up for a memoir. Tell Me More host Michel Martin speaks with the Chopras about their new book, Brotherhood: Dharma, Destiny, and the American Dream.

On the different paths each took

Deepak Chopra: "I like to say that Sanjiv took care of the body and I took care of the soul."

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The Two-Way
9:26 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Bomber Attacks International Red Cross's Afghan Compound

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 2:27 pm

A coordinated attack has struck the offices of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, Gunmen reportedly assaulted the compound after a suicide bomber detonated a device at the entrance, where a guard was killed.

Update at 3:58 p.m. ET. Reaction From Red Cross:

"We condemn this attack in the strongest possible terms," ICRC's head of operations for South Asia, Jacques de Maio, says. "Right now, our thoughts go out to the family of our dead colleague."

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The Salt
8:49 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Personalized Coca-Colas, But Not If Your Name Is Mohammed Or Maria

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 9:53 am

Remember the disappointment you felt as a kid at the souvenir shop when that personalized key chain wasn't available in your name? For me, it was never finding "Allison" with two L's. My colleague Maria says she was always stuck with "Mary" as her only option.

Facebook fans of Coca-Cola's new "Share a Coke" campaign are having similar frustrations. As part of its new campaign, which recently launched in Europe, the soda giant is printing popular first names on labels of Coke, Diet Coke and Coke Zero.

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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Wed May 29, 2013

6 Stories To Mark 60 Years Since First Summit Of Everest

Mount Everest.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:12 am

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World
5:17 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Nepalese Climber Gives Up For Now On Regaining Everest Title

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne with a follow-up on the record for oldest person to scale Mount Everest. An 81-year-old Nepalese climber earned the title five years ago when he was 76. Last week, an 80-year-old Japanese climber took the crown. Now Min Bahadur Sherchan has given up his attempt to snatch it back but bad weather, due to the season, forced him to turn back. Disappointing. Still, it wasn't age that proved the ultimate barrier.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
4:31 am
Wed May 29, 2013

U.S. Drone Strike Hits Taliban Stronghold In Pakistan

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On this Wednesday, we are following developments in Pakistan. A U.S. drone strike has killed four suspected militants, including - according to some reports - the Taliban's second-in-command in Pakistan. Now, we should say the militant group denies that he's dead. This is the first strike since President Obama's speech last Thursday, announcing that the use of drones would be scaled back to limit civilian casualties.

Africa
3:30 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Al-Qaida Letter Reprimands Difficult Employee

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. You could call it a failing performance review. Recently uncovered correspondence from the North African branch of al-Qaida lays out - in bullet points - the shortcomings of one of its local leaders. In the letter, he is chastised by his bosses for sloppy expense reports, ignoring emails and failing to pull off, quote, "any single spectacular operation."

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Asia
3:30 am
Wed May 29, 2013

China's Leaders Promise To Speed Up Economic Growth

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 11:31 am

The Communist Party's new leadership has pledged to change China's slowing economy by putting a greater emphasis on private enterprise and reining in huge but far less profitable state-owned businesses. Economists say the party has no choice but to update if it wants to stay in power, but they doubt that a genuine overhaul is in the works.

Middle East
3:29 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Opposition In Syria Stalls Peace Talks Decision

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Religion
3:29 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Pope Attracts Attention For Tolerance Toward Atheists

Pope Francis, shown here at his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Wednesday, has emphasized inclusiveness in many of his speeches. In recent remarks, he reached out to atheists.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 12:36 pm

Pope Francis has been in office for just over two months and has been making headlines for many remarks that emphasize inclusiveness, contrasting sharply with his predecessors' style and apparently even with centuries-old Catholic dogma.

The latest was a statement last week that all human beings, even atheists, can be redeemed.

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Parallels
12:58 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Syria's Civil War: The View From A Damascus Shrine

Zeinab
Nishant Dahiya NPR

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:47 am

Traveling to Damascus gives you a view of Syria's war turned inside out.

The international community talks of arming Syria's rebels against President Bashar Assad, but in the capital many people still hope the rebels will lose.

That's the thinking we found around a Muslim shrine in Damascus, a tribute to the granddaughter of the Prophet Muhammad. She lived centuries ago, but a Damascus doctor we met spoke of her in the present tense.

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Parallels
12:55 am
Wed May 29, 2013

After The War, A Bitter Feud Remains In Two Libyan Towns

A destroyed home in Tawargha, south of Misrata, on June 5, 2012. Residents have not returned home for fear of death.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:04 pm

Little boys play soccer in the afternoon heat at a makeshift camp near Libya's capital Tripoli. Their homes, or what's left of them, are in Tawargha, a small town about 20 miles from the Mediterranean coast.

The town has been empty since August of 2011. Its residents fled in cars and on foot, under fire from rebel militiamen from the nearby town of Misrata.

The siege of Misrata was one of the bloodiest battles of the Libyan war. Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi shelled Misrata relentlessly, killing hundreds.

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Planet Money
3:17 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

In A Single ATM, The Story Of A Nation's Economy

A bank in Yangon recently opened the first ATM in Myanmar that's connected to the rest of the world.
Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:35 pm

Nan Htwe Nye works at an elementary school in Yangon, Myanmar. She started trying to use ATM machines a few months ago, and things haven't been going so well.

The machines are often broken, she says. "But," she adds, "we hope it will better in the future." This is, more or less, the story of ATMs — and of banking in general — in Myanmar.

She's visiting the headquarters of CB Bank, at the first ATM in the country that was connected to banks all around the world.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

After Long Wait For Combat, Tad Nagaki Became POW Liberator

After serving in World War II, Tad Nagaki returned to Nebraska to farm corn, beans and sugar beets.
Courtesy of Mary Previte

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:43 am

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

"Tad Nagaki was a gentle, quiet farmer," says Mary Previte, a retired New Jersey legislator and former captive of the Japanese during World War II. That quiet farmer, who did extraordinary things, died in April at the age of 93 at his grandson's Colorado home.

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Europe
3:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Woolwich Murder Suspect May Have Ties To Islamist Groups

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:43 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The killing last week of a British soldier on a London street in broad daylight has raised questions for the police, the government and the British people at large. In a few minutes, we'll talk about reaction to the murder, including some anti-Muslim attacks. First, some of the latest developments.

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Europe
3:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Rise After Murder Of British Soldier

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:43 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, the repercussions of Lee Rigby's murder in British society, what damage did the gruesome public declaration of responsibility for the killing do to relations between Muslims and other Britains? Well, joining us now is John Burns, London bureau chief for the New York Times. Welcome to the program once again.

JOHN BURNS: It's a pleasure.

SIEGEL: There have been reports of increased attacks on British Muslims since last week. How bad has it been?

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Latin America
3:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Catholic Church Moderates Ceasefire Between Honduran Gangs

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:21 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Honduras today, the nation's two most powerful gangs announced a cease-fire. The Roman Catholic Church mediated the agreement. And the announcement took place inside a prison, in what's considered the world's deadliest city, San Pedro Sula. NPR's Carrie Kahn is there, and she joins me now. And, Carrie, describe the scene at the cease-fire announcement today in prison.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Hacking Death Of U.K. Soldier Prompts Anti-Muslim Attacks

A supporter of the far-right English Defense League gestures near Downing Street in central London on Monday.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:35 pm

There's been a sharp rise in anti-Muslim attacks and intimidation in the U.K. since last week's hacking death of British soldier Lee Rigby by two men who said they killed him in the name of Islam.

The Guardian newspaper says that Tell Mama, a hotline for reporting such attacks, registered 193 incidents by Monday evening, including 10 attacks on mosques.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

London Attack Suspect Leaves Hospital; More Charges Filed

A Nov. 23, 2010, photo shows Michael Adebolajo (center, in dark T-shirt) with suspected Al-Shabab recruits who were arrested by Kenyan police. Adebolajo, one of the main suspects in the brutal murder of a soldier in London, was discharged from the hospital Tuesday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:14 am

One of the suspects in the murder last week of British soldier Lee Rigby has been released from the hospital and is in police custody. Michael Adebowale, 22, received treatment after being shot by police following the brutal attack on Rigby in Woolwich, London. The other main suspect, Michael Adebolajo, 28, remains in the hospital.

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The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Somali Militants Claim To Have Shot Down U.S. Drone

A 2007 file photo released by the Department of Defense, An MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle.
Larry E. Reid Jr. Associated Press

A suspected U.S. reconnaissance drone has crashed in a region of southern Somalia controlled by the al-Shabab militant group, a governor of the region says.

Abdikadir Mohamed Nur, the governor of the Lower Shabelle region, told Reuters that al-Shabab had shot down the aircraft over the coastal town of Bulamareer, south of the capital, Mogadishu.

"Finally they hit it and the drone crashed," he said.

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Europe
9:43 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Violence In Europe Leaves People Fearful

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Today, we're going to spend some time on some important stories coming from overseas. In a few minutes, we'll hear what one young woman's charges of rap reveal about how Pakistan's system of justice works - or doesn't - when it comes to sexual violence.

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The Two-Way
8:57 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Does Canada's $100 Bill Smell Like Maple Syrup? Many Say So

Canada's $100 bill. Some think it smells sweet.
Bank of Canada

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 1:31 pm

This much is true: Many Canadians apparently think their government has embedded a maple-scented scratch-and-sniff patch in the nation's $100 bills.

According to CTV, "dozens of people" contacted the Bank of Canada after the polymer bills were introduced in 2011 to say they were sure there was something fishy ... or perhaps we should say sweet ... about the money.

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The Two-Way
7:27 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Baby Is Rescued From Building's Sewage Pipe In China

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:27 am

A baby boy in China has been safely rescued from a sewage pipe after the abandoned newborn had become lodged in an apartment building's public toilet system. A resident heard the infant's cries, and firefighters cut out a portion of pipe containing the boy. That section was then rushed to the hospital, where the baby was carefully removed.

Authorities are treating the disturbing incident as an attempted homicide and were still looking for the baby's parents. As for his medical condition, the boy is reportedly stable, but with severe bruising and some cuts.

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The Two-Way
5:27 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Report: An Angry Russia Will Deliver Missiles To Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) and British Prime Minister David Cameron met earlier this month. Cameron said then that he was encouraged by Russia's willingness to take part in a peace conference on Syria. Now, Russia is said to be angry about the EU's decision to lift an embargo on arming the Syrian opposition.
Alexey Nikoksky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 6:40 am

The European Union's decision to end its embargo on arming the opposition in Syria has been followed by sharp criticism from Russia's foreign ministry and word that Russia will follow through on plans to deliver anti-aircraft missiles to President Bashar Assad's military.

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Parallels
10:46 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

In Damascus, A View Of Syria's War Turned Inside Out

The Ummayyid Mosque in Damascus has been a mosque for around 1,400 years. It sits in the center of a city where many people are struggling to live normal lives amid war.
Steve Inskeep NPR

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:41 am

Many years ago, the president of Syria, Hafez al-Assad, approved the construction of a new presidential residence on a mountainside above Damascus.

Assad never occupied the building, saying his successor should take it. When his son Bashar Assad became that successor, he didn't move into the house, either. He preferred a residence down the slope.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

EU To End Arms Embargo On Syrian Opposition

British Foreign Secretary William Hague (left) talks with Belgium's foreign minister, Didier Reynders, during a European Union foreign ministers meeting in Brussels on Monday.
Yves Logghe AP

The European Union plans to end its embargo on arming the Syrian opposition, British Foreign Secretary William Hague said Monday.

The Associated Press reports: "Hague insisted that Britain had 'no immediate plans to send arms to Syria. It gives us flexibility to respond in the future if the situation continues to deteriorate.' "

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