World News

Health
5:17 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Western Hemisphere Wipes Out Its Third Virus

Health worker Jackie Carnegie delivers a rubella vaccine in Colorado in 1972.
Ira Gay Sealy Denver Post via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 9:39 am

It took 15 years and hundreds of millions of vaccines. But North America and South America have officially eradicated rubella, health authorities said Wednesday. Rubella is only the third virus eradicated from people in the Western Hemisphere.

Also known as German measles, rubella causes only a mild illness in children, with a rash and sometimes a fever.

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Asia
4:11 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

He Carried His Mom On His Back For 5 Hours En Route To Medical Care

Amar Baramu carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours, then rode with her on a bus for 12 more, to get her to a hospital for the head wound she suffered during the earthquake.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 9:42 am

He carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours.

Then he traveled with her by bus for 12 more.

She suffered a severe head injury when the earthquake rumbled through her village of Thumi. He was trying to get her to a hospital in the Gorkha district in northern-central Nepal.

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Parallels
3:25 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Ex-Gitmo Detainees In Uruguay Protest At U.S. Embassy

Former Guantanamo prison inmates walk between their tents and the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital, where four former prisoners are protesting what they say is an inadequate deal in exchange for permanent asylum.
Pablo Porciuncula AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 6:19 pm

When six Middle Eastern prisoners were freed from Guantanamo Bay prison and given refuge by the tiny South American country of Uruguay in December, they were grateful.

But four months later, four of them are camping outside the U.S. Embassy protesting as inadequate the deal they've been offered in exchange for permanent asylum.

Three small tents have been pitched on the smooth green lawn in front of the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital.

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Documents Show FAA Questioned Mental Fitness of Germanwings Co-Pilot Andreas Lubitz

September 13, 2015 photo of Andreas Lubitz, who is believed to have deliberately crashed Germanwings flight 9525 into a mountain in southern France on March 24, 2015, killing all 150 people on board.
Getty Images Getty Images

Newly released documents from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration show that it initially declined to grant a medical certificate to Andreas Lubitz, the pilot who is believed to have intentionally crashed an airline into the French Alps last month.

The documents, obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, provide an eerie glimpse into Lubitz's mental history and an effort to conceal that from U.S. medical examiners.

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Asia
2:27 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Returning To Vietnam Years After Fleeing War, A Man Finally Feels At Home

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
2:27 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Fearing Aftershocks, Thousands Stream Out Of Kathmandu

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 6:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
11:58 am
Thu April 30, 2015

How British Farmers Are Making Rapeseed (Canola) Posh And Flavorful

Algy Garrod's rapeseed in bloom in Norfolk, England.
Anne Bramley for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 2:23 pm

Rapeseed, an oilseed known in North America as canola, has a mild reputation as a cooking oil. Maybe that's because the version that most consumers know is a pale, neutral-flavored oil used for frying and baking.

But in the U.K., a more colorful and flavorful version has made its way onto store shelves: cold-pressed rapeseed that goes for £5-7 per 500 milliliters (about $9-12 for 17 fluid ounces).

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Thu April 30, 2015

France Investigates Claims Its Soldiers Abused Children In Africa

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 1:28 pm

French President Francois Hollande says there will be grave consequences if allegations that French soldiers sexually abused children in the Central African Republic are true.

"There should be no stain on our French forces wherever they're serving," he said. "I will be implacable if any soldiers are shown to have behaved badly."

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Dozens Of Writers Join Protest Of Free Speech Award For 'Charlie Hebdo'

This pair of Charlie Hebdo covers from 2012 pokes fun at the magazine's "irresponsible" approach to humor.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 12:28 pm

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The protest over a free speech award to Charlie Hebdo continues to grow.

Earlier this week, six authors withdrew from the PEN American Center's annual gala in response to the organization's decision to give the French satirical magazine its Freedom of Expression Courage Award.

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Parallels
8:26 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Is Bashar Assad Just Losing Some Ground ... Or His Grip On Power?

People gather around a helicopter reportedly belonging to Syrian government forces that crashed in March in Jabal al-Zawiya in northwest Syria. Islamist rebels captured four crew members, while a fifth was killed, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Opposition fighters have made a number of advances in recent weeks.
Ghaith Omran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 6:19 pm

The past few weeks have brought almost daily news of rebel victories in their 4-year-old battle against Syria's President Bashar Assad.

There was the capture of the crucial Nassib border crossing with Jordan — a key trade route and source of government taxes. And some of the biggest rebel victories have come in the northern province of Idlib, where the opposition recently captured the provincial capital, Idlib City, as well as military bases and other key towns.

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Goats and Soda
8:21 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Safe Surgery Is A Dream In The Developing World

A surgeon and nurse anesthetist a baby by emergency cesarean section at a hospital in Rwanda.
Amber Lucero Dwyer/Courtesy Lifebox Foundation

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 12:21 pm

As you're wheeled down to surgery, nervously waving goodbye to loved ones, it's unlikely that one of your fears is whether your surgeon will have to double up as your anesthesiologist.

But at a hospital in Kenya, Dr. David Barash remembers watching an obstetrician perform a cesarean section while at the same time instructing a nurse on how to deliver anesthesia.

Then at another hospital in Nigeria, Barash saw women left unattended, lying on beds in the hallway, to recover on their own after C-sections.

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Parallels
6:26 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Bullfighting For Buddhists: A Less Bloody Alternative In South Korea

The General (right) and his opponent, Dragon, lock horns during this year's Cheongdo Bullfighting Festival in South Korea. There are no matadors and no swords in the South Korean version. The bulls fight until one turns and runs.
Marius Stankiewicz for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 9:19 am

Sitting in a stadium that seats 10,000, I look down at the ring and something I never thought I'd see in Asia: a bullfight.

But instead of pitting matador versus beast, two bulls face off in the South Korean version. And befitting a Buddhist country, the battle ends not in death, but in surrender. In some cases, one of the combatants simply turns and wanders off.

"In Korean bullfighting there is no mortal end in sight for these beasts of burden," my interpreter says.

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Middle East
4:24 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Israel Criticized For Leaving Pregnant Surrogates In Nepal

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 9:07 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
3:16 am
Thu April 30, 2015

With Only One Runway, Kathmandu's Airport Hinders Earthquake Relief

Monks and aid workers walk to the arrival terminal at Kathmandu's international airport. The plane was unable to secure an arrival gate when it landed on Wednesday.
Taylor Weidman LightRocket/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 12:04 pm

There's a lot of aid headed toward Nepal, but it's not getting there as fast as people would like.

The reason: There aren't enough runways.

The country's only international airport is Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu. It's tiny. It has just one runway. So it can't accommodate all the planes flying in.

The single runway has been closed several times for earthquake repairs. Also, there are limited places for planes to park. On many days, pilots circled for hours waiting for another plane to take off because there's no room to land.

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Parallels
2:42 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Saudi King Salman Reshuffles Line Of Succession

Earlier this month, Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's new deputy crown prince, met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo.
Egyptian Presidency Handout EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 2:42 pm

Things are changing in Saudi Arabia. The new king made a surprising move this week, choosing his nephew to take over as crown prince and his son to take the position of deputy crown prince.

The decision marks a generational shift. For the first time, a grandson of the founder of the kingdom is heir to the throne. And one young prince, the son of King Salman, is emerging as a war hero for many Saudis as the country continues to carry out airstrikes in Yemen.

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Parallels
1:23 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Learning About The Quran ... From A Catholic Archbishop

Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald is one of the Catholic Church's top experts on Islam. He has served the Vatican in places such as Tunisia, Uganda and Egypt, and now is promoting interfaith understanding by teaching Jesuit students in Cleveland about the Quran.
Rob Wetzler

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 1:11 pm

As a 12-year-old Catholic boy growing up in England, Michael Fitzgerald decided he wanted to be a missionary in Africa. Eight years later, he was studying theology and learning Arabic in Tunisia.

He went on to devote his priestly ministry to the promotion of interfaith understanding between Muslims and Christians, and became one of the top Roman Catholic experts on Islam. He has served as the archbishop of Tunisia, the papal nuncio — effectively a Vatican ambassador — in Cairo, and the Vatican's delegate to the Arab League.

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Goats and Soda
5:05 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Israeli Dads Welcome Surrogate-Born Baby In Nepal On Earthquake Day

Now this is an international baby: Born to a surrogate mom in Nepal (who was implanted with an egg from a South African donor) and now living in Israel with his parents, Amir Vogel Greengold (left) and Gilad Greengold.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 10:19 pm

The sperm came from Israel. It was frozen and flown to Thailand, where a South African egg donor awaited. After the egg was fertilized, the embryo traveled to Nepal and was implanted in the Indian woman who agreed to serve as the surrogate mother.

And roughly nine months later, there was a big, bouncing earthquake.

The world of international surrogacy is ... pretty complicated.

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Business
3:01 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Japan's Abe Pushes The Pacific Trade Deal Onto Center Stage

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a joint press conference at the White House with President Obama on Tuesday. Abe is urging U.S. lawmakers to approve a trans-Pacific trade deal.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama's plan for creating a Pacific Rim trade zone has been hovering in the wings, waiting for the right moment to demand attention.

On Wednesday, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pushed it out on to center stage during a dramatic joint meeting of the U.S. House and Senate. He urged Congress to approve the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP.

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Middle East
2:58 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Saudi Arabian Monarch Announces Changes To Kingdom's Line Of Succession

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 5:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
2:58 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Nepali Prime Minister Declares 3 Days Of Mourning Following Quake

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 5:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Media
2:58 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Reporter Jason Rezaian Being Held On 'Accusations,' Brother Says

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 5:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
2:58 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Vietnam Native Who Fled Country During War Returns Home

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 5:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:58 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

U.S. Army Veterans, Survivors To Mark 70th Anniversary Of Dachau Liberation

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 5:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Pope Francis Calls Gender Pay Gap A 'Pure Scandal'

Pope Francis delivers a speech Wednesday during his general audience at Saint Peter's Square in Vatican City.
Claudio Peri EPA /Landov

Pope Francis called the gender pay gap a "pure scandal" in remarks Wednesday on marriage and family.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports that Francis' remarks, at his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square, are some of his most forceful yet in favor of women.

Francis raised his voice as he made a plea for an end to the situation in which men typically earn more than women for performing the same task.

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The Two-Way
11:16 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Game Of Thrones: Saudi King Shakes Up Line Of Succession

Saudi King Salman (center) appears alongside then-Crown Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz (third from left) and then-deputy Crown Prince and Interior Minister Mohammed bin Nayef (left) in January. Muqrin has since been pushed aside to make way for Mohammed.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 9:34 am

Saudi Arabia's King Salman has issued a series of royal decrees bringing about a dramatic reshuffling in the line of succession and ushering in a younger generation to take up key ministerial positions.

This is the second major shake-up to the ranks of power in the kingdom since the 79-year-old Salman assumed the throne Jan. 23.

(There are roughly 15,000 princes and princesses in Saudi Arabia, but power is consolidated among a few. You can follow along with this helpful Wall Street Journal family tree.)

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World
10:28 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Nepal, Before The Earthquake Struck: A Photographer's Portfolio

Girls share a quiet moment before school starts in Barpark village in the Gorkha district, 1984. The village was reportedly at the epicenter of the earthquake.
Courtesy of Kevin Bubriski and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:36 pm

Kevin Bubriski may live in Vermont but his heart is in Nepal.

Bubriski first visited Nepal in 1975 as a 20-year-old Peace Corps volunteer. He worked on a project to bring drinking water to villages. He came with a curiosity about the place and a camera in hand. And it was the camera that has shaped his destiny.

He began taking photos of the people he met and the sights he saw. And he has never stopped.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Russia Tries To Regain Control Of Space Capsule

A Russian launch vehicle carrying the Progress M-27M cargo ship lifts off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday. Fears mounted Wednesday that the unmanned cargo capsule was lost and may plunge back to Earth as ground control failed to gain control of the orbiting ship for a second day in a row.
Roscosmos EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 9:49 am

Russia's space agency is trying to save an unmanned cargo ship that spun out of control on its way to the International Space Station.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Wed April 29, 2015

In Nepal, A Flood Of People Leave Capital To Return Home

A young girl sits on her luggage as she waits in a long line with her family, hoping to board buses provided by the government to return to their homes outside Kathmandu.
Diego Azubel EPA /LANDOV

Several days after a devastating earthquake hit Nepal, officials are using helicopters to ferry aid to remote areas — and thousands of people are leaving Kathmandu, where many had sought refuge. Rescue crews are still working to help survivors of the 7.8-magnitude quake.

Reporting from the district of Gorkha, the epicenter of Saturday's tremor, NPR's Julie McCarthy says, "When we arrived last night, you could feel the ground shaking constantly. It felt like Jello, and it lasted through the evening."

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

4 Americans Were Hiking In Nepal When Quake Hit

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Nepalis In Worst-Hit Areas Suffer Through Devastating Destruction

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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