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The litigants in the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday were a remarkable bunch: On one side, the Central Bank of Iran. On the other, the victims of Iran-sponsored terrorist attacks going back three decades.

The constitutional question: Whether Congress — in dealing with both — had infringed on the independence of the judiciary.

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OK, Kelly, can I blow your mind with something I learned today?

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Sure.

SHAPIRO: England does not have its own national anthem about England.

MCEVERS: Huh?

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Secretary of State John Kerry says Iran reported to him that a key component of its plutonium nuclear reactor has been removed, as Iran nears the reduction of its nuclear program sufficient to trigger sanctions relief.

Kerry tells reporters that Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif informed him that the reactor core, or calandria, will be filled with concrete and destroyed in the coming hours.

Lego says it is changing its guidelines for the purchase of large amounts of its iconic toy bricks, a policy that had generated a social media firestorm when used to block sales to Chinese artist Ai Weiwei.

The company said in a statement that it will no longer ask people who want to buy the bricks in bulk what they're using them for:

On the South Korean side of its 151-mile border with North Korea, banks of loudspeakers are back on, blaring propaganda. It's the South's response to the North's nuclear test last week.

Jérôme Valcke, a longtime ally to suspended FIFA President Sepp Blatter, has been dismissed from his post as the secretary general of soccer's world governing body.

Valcke was initially suspended from his post by FIFA's ethics committee last fall, following allegations that he was involved in a scheme to profit from World Cup ticket sales.

Acting Secretary General Dr. Markus Kattner will continue in the role, FIFA says.

Less than 24 hours after reports of their detention emerged, 10 U.S. Navy personnel have been freed by Iran. The sailors left an Iranian naval base on Farsi Island in the Persian Gulf on Wednesday morning, along with the boats they were operating when they were taken into custody.

"There are no indications that the sailors were harmed during their brief detention," the Department of Defense says, confirming the release of nine men and one woman.

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When Saudi Arabia executed leading Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr early this month, it was the beginning of a downward spiral in relations between the kingdom and Iran.

A violent protest at the Saudi Embassy in Iran's capital Tehran led Saudi Arabia to cut ties with its longtime regional rival.

Nimr al-Nimr was a leader in Saudi Arabia's marginalized Shiite community and an outspoken critic of the government.

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What did villagers in England eat for dinner 3,000 years ago? And what were they wearing?

These are the kinds of questions that archaeologists believe they can answer with a Bronze Age-era discovery at the Must Farm Quarry, some 80 miles north of London.

"What's special about this is, it's not the archaeology of the important people. It's not burial mounds. This is the archaeology of the home," David Gibson from the Cambridge Archaeological Unit says in an interview with All Things Considered.

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How close was notorious Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán from pulling off another escape, right under the noses of Mexican authorities?

Is it real or is it satire?

In Thailand, a dark-skinned actress laments, "If I was white, I would win."

In India, a movie director says, "I can't have any dark people on my set" and hands a skin-lightening product to two dusky actors.

It wasn't so long ago, says Eugenio Bito-onon Jr., that everyone in the Spratly Islands, his patch of the South China Sea, pretty much got along.

"Oh yeah, it was really very peaceful," says Bito-onon, a Filipino who's served for the past five years as mayor of this archipelago of more than 100 small islands and reefs.

Here's something that never used to happen in Saudi Arabia:

In the wake of the crisis with Iran, Mohammed bin Salman, the kingdom's deputy crown prince and defense minister, as well as King Salman's favored son, gave a five-hour interview to a reporter from The Economist, and the British news magazine published the entire transcript.

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