World News

Parallels
2:35 am
Sat February 28, 2015

A German Muslim Asks His Compatriots: 'What Do You Want To Know?'

Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims.
Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 8:27 pm

Sadiqu al-Mousllie sees humor as a good way to fight growing anti-Islam sentiment in Germany.

He lives in Braunschweig, in western Germany. Earlier this month, he decided to go downtown and hold up a sign that read, "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?"

"This is a bridge of communication," the Syrian-born German says. "Some people dared to ask, some others not, so we went to them and give them some chocolate and a say of our prophet to know what Muslims are thinking about."

Mousllie, 44, says he hopes to do it every other week.

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The Two-Way
6:52 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

After Second Round Of Talks, Cubans, Americans Emerge Upbeat

Josefina Vidal, director general of the U.S. division at Cuba's Foreign Ministry, smiles at the start of the Cuba talks at the State Department in Washington, on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

After a second round of talks, Cuban and American diplomats emerged upbeat about the potential to reestablish diplomatic ties between the long-estranged neighbors.

In a press conference following the talks, Roberta Jacobson, the diplomat leading the talks for the Americans, said: "Today we saw the kind of constructive exchange that advances us toward a more productive diplomatic relationship."

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Mexican Attorney General Who Handled Case Of Vanished Students Will Step Down

Mexico's Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam is leaving his post to take a new Cabinet-level job as head of urban and rural development.
Marco Ugarte AP

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:31 pm

Embattled Mexican Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam will be stepping down. The announcement came Friday after Murillo Karam weathered months of criticism over the way he handled the investigation into the disappearance of 43 college students.

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Europe
4:28 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Putin Critic Boris Nemtsov Shot Dead In Moscow

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:13 pm

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Putin Critic Boris Nemtsov Shot Dead

Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov was shot dead in Moscow today.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:52 pm

(This post last updated at 10:50 p.m. ET)

Boris Nemtsov, a former Russian deputy prime minister turned prominent critic of President Vladimir Putin, was shot dead today on a street in central Moscow, the Interior Ministry told the Interfax news agency.

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Middle East
3:38 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Jordan's 'Philosopher Prince': Literacy Would Help Fight Fanaticism

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:13 pm

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

A Rival's Retirement Prompts 1-Word Statement From Aussie Politician

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 12:47 pm

"If you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all" goes the old saw. Australian politician Anthony Albanese seems to have taken that to heart. Almost.

Upon receiving news that Max Moore-Wilton, the head of the Sydney Airport Corp. was planning to retire in May, Albanese, a member of Parliament from the opposition Labour Party, issued a one-word statement: "Good."

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World
2:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

U.S., Cuba Work On Plans To Upgrade Diplomatic Posts

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:13 pm

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Asia
2:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

New Chinese Social Media Policy May Be Used To Target Political Speech

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:13 pm

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Latin America
2:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Major Mexican Cartel Leader Arrested

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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World
2:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Alienation And Charismatic Recruiters Among Keys To Radicalization

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:13 pm

Since a young, college-educated Briton was identified as "Jihadi John," the voice of the Islamic State's beheading videos, allegations have been made about the UK government's role in radicalizing British Muslim youths through surveillance and harassment. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Maajid Nawaz, a self-described former Islamic radical who grew up in Essex, England. He now runs the counter-extremist organization Quilliam.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Rocker Gary Glitter Jailed For 16 Years For Child Sex Abuse

A court sketch of former glam rocker Gary Glitter, who was sentenced today to 16 years in prison for sexually abusing three schoolgirls.
Elizabeth Cook PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:50 am

Rocker Gary Glitter, best known for the stadium rock anthem "Rock & Roll (Part 2)," was sentenced to 16 years in prison for sex offenses during the 1970s and '80s against three girls between the ages of 8 and 13.

Glitter, whose real name is Paul Gadd, was sentenced today for attempted rape, four counts of indecent assault and one of having sex with a girl under 13, the BBC reports. A jury found the 70-year-old guilty of the charges on Feb. 5, and Judge Alistair McCreath said then that Glitter would remain jailed until his sentencing.

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Parallels
8:19 am
Fri February 27, 2015

After 6,000 Years, Time For A Renovation At Iraq's Citadel

Construction workers at the Erbil Citadel, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 8:40 am

A map of the northern Iraqi city of Erbil looks like a dart board: circles, radiating outward from a central core. The bull's-eye sits high on a hill, crowned by ancient walls.

The Erbil Citadel has stood here for at least 6,000 years. It's one of the oldest — and possibly the oldest — continuously inhabited sites on Earth.

The stories coming from this region these days are primarily ones of destruction and war. But here, in the Citadel, there's a different narrative, that of a plan to rebuild, restore and revitalize this ancient site.

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Goats and Soda
8:11 am
Fri February 27, 2015

It Kills Germs For Up To 6 Hours. Can It Wipe Out Ebola?

A health worker in Liberia washes up after leaving a clinic's Ebola isolation area.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:59 pm

Clean hands go a long way toward preventing the spread of many illnesses, including Ebola. But finding the right hand-wash to impede deadly germs is tricky.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Bangladeshi-American Blogger Hacked To Death In Dhaka

People gather on the spot where Bangladeshi blogger Avijit Roy was killed in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Thursday.
Abir Abdullah EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 11:17 am

A Bangladeshi-American blogger, whose writings denounced fundamentalist thought and earned him death threats from Islamist groups, was hacked to death by two attackers in Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital. Avijit Roy's wife, Rafida Ahmed, who was with him during the attack late Thursday, was severely wounded.

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The Two-Way
5:51 am
Fri February 27, 2015

More Details On 'Jihadi John': Early Run-Ins And Radicalization

A playground can be seen outside an address in London where Kuwaiti-born London computer programmer Mohammed Emwazi is believed to have lived. Emwazi has been identified as masked ISIS militant "Jihadi John."
Niklas Halle'n AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 1:58 pm

More details are emerging about Mohammed Emwazi, the man identified as the militant seen in beheading videos released by the self-styled Islamic State. His name came out Thursday.

Emwazi is a British citizen who was born in Kuwait and grew up in West London. He reportedly graduated from the University of Westminster with a degree in computer programming.

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National Security
4:20 am
Fri February 27, 2015

ISIS Extremist Who Beheaded Prisoners Is Identified

A playground is seen in London, outside an address where Kuwaiti-born London computer programmer Mohammed Emwazi is believed to have lived. Emwazi has been identified as masked ISIS militant "Jihadi John."
Niklas Halle'n AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 7:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Fri February 27, 2015

ISIS Video Shows Extremists Destroying Artifacts

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Britain Tries To Counter Extremists' Appeal

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

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The Salt
1:38 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

A field of unharvested wheat is seen in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, in 2012. Wheat wasn't cultivated in Britain until some 6,000 years ago, but DNA evidence suggests early Britons were eating the grain at least 8,000 years ago.
Darren Staples Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:45 am

Scientists have learned a lot about our distant ancestors from DNA that's thousands of years old. Like the fact that we've inherited some Neanderthal DNA, so apparently our ancestors mated with them. Now there's new research from DNA that moves on from paleo-mating to paleo-eating.

About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers in the Near East figured out how to grow cereal crops like wheat. The farming culture spread, and wherever it went, people traded in their spears for plows.

That's the conventional view. Apparently, it was more complicated than that.

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Goats and Soda
1:35 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Go Behind The Scenes With The Producer Who Made 'Life After Death'

Twins Watta and Fatta Balyon pose for a picture outside their guardian Mamuedeh Kanneh's house.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:54 pm

They hired a car and drove for 10 hours over the most rutted dirt roads you can imagine, dodging motorbikes, pedestrians and overloaded cars all the way.

It was December. NPR producers John Poole and Sami Yenigun had come to see what happens to a village after Ebola has struck.

Barkedu, in Liberia, is a beautiful place, green and forested. Tall hills start to rise near its border with Guinea. Cows and chickens roam around the village, which is built along the Lofa River. A small stream runs through Barkedu, where people bath and wash their clothes.

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Parallels
4:11 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

For One Parliamentarian, A Stronger Jordan Is Key To Fighting ISIS

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

There's a election law implemented in 2010 in Jordan known as "one person, one vote" that advocates of reform and democratization there regard, surprisingly, as a big step backward.

That's because of the strong ties Jordanians feel to family, clan and tribe, says Omar Razzaz, an economist and banker in Amman, the Jordanian capital.

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Ahead Of Netanyahu's Speech To Congress, Hints Of A Thaw

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 10:38 am

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will reportedly meet with Sens. Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, and Harry Reid, D-Nev., the chamber's top Democrat, after his March 3 speech to Congress.

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Middle East
3:09 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

ISIS's 'Jihadi John' Revealed As Londoner Born In Kuwait

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:47 am

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Washington Post contributor Souad Mekhennet. The Post broke the news about the identity of "Jihadi John," the masked man with a British accent who has beheaded several hostages held by the Islamic State and who speaks directly to the camera in ISIS videos. The identity was revealed as Mohammed Emwazi, a Briton from a well-to-do family who grew up in West London and graduated college with a degree in computer programming.

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Author Interviews
3:09 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Don't Be Afraid Of The Bullets' A Memoir Of Reporting In Yemen

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

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Latin America
3:09 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Opposition Grows To Nicaragua Canal Connecting Atlantic And Pacific

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

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Goats and Soda
2:38 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

How Tents And Fried Chicken Help Stop Cancer

Physicians Nowiba Mugambi and Erica Palys discuss a patient's X-ray at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. The hospital plans to open a new cancer treatment center in April.
Evelyn Hockstein Courtesy of AMPATH

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 10:09 am

Not too many years ago, nearly half of the kids diagnosed with cancer in Guatemala wouldn't come in for treatment. There wasn't much chemotherapy to be had, and parents didn't think treatments worked. Most children with curable cancers died.

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The Two-Way
1:57 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

South Korea Decriminalizes Cheating, Shares Of Contraceptive Companies Rise

Park Han-chul (center) president of South Korea's Constitutional Court, sits with other judges prior to the ruling on the country's adultery law Thursday in Seoul.
Lee Jin-man AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 5:59 pm

Extramarital sex is no longer a crime in South Korea, giving shares of contraceptive companies a boost.

On Thursday, South Korea's Constitutional Court struck down a decades-old law that made adultery a crime punishable by up to two years in prison.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn tell our Newscast unit that "roughly 100,000 people have been convicted of adultery since the law was passed in 1953, but conviction rates have recently fallen to below 1 percent."

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Banksy's Murals Turn Up In Gaza Strip

A mural is seen on the remains of a house that witnesses said was destroyed by Israeli shelling during a 50-day war last summer in Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip.
Suhaib Salem Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 3:45 pm

Banksy's work is now in the Gaza Strip.

The artist, who uses public spaces for his often-provocative murals, posted images that he said were of art he created in the Gaza Strip, along with a two-minute video of life in the Palestinian territory, titled "Make this the year YOU discover a new destination."

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Judge Throws Out Cover-Up Allegations Against Argentine President

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed allegations by prosecutors that Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, seen here Feb. 11, tried to cover up the alleged involvement of Iranian officials in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:38 pm

Last month, an Argentine prosecutor who was due to testify about an alleged cover-up in the investigation into the deadly 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires was found dead.

Alberto Nisman had accused President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's government of covering up Iran's alleged role in the bombing that killed 85 people to push through a grains-for-oil deal with Tehran. After Nisman's death, the investigation was continued by prosecutor Gerardo Pollicita.

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