World News

Parallels
10:53 am
Mon November 25, 2013

President Obama Bets Big On Middle East Diplomacy

President Obama, speaking on Saturday night, said the interim deal on Iran's nuclear program is an important first step. The Obama administration is currently working on several major initiatives in the Middle East.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 6:49 am

The track record for Middle East diplomacy is pretty dismal, yet this is where President Obama is playing all his important diplomatic cards.

With the interim deal on Iran's nuclear program, the president is now engaged in his fifth major diplomatic initiative in five contiguous countries stretching from Afghanistan in the east to Israel in the west.

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Movies
9:36 am
Mon November 25, 2013

From Morgan Freeman to Idris Elba, Who Played Mandela Best?

Many films have been made about Nelson Mandela. Danny Glover, Morgan Freeman, Dennis Haysbert, and now Idris Elba have all tried to step into the icon's shoes. Host Michel Martin speaks to Sean Jacobs, founder of the blog Africa Is A Country, about which actor played him best.

Parallels
8:04 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Can Child Marriages Be Stopped?

Christina Asima says she had no choice but to marry last year at age 12 to help care for younger siblings after her mother abandoned the family. But she says her husband was abusive, so she left him, and now must look after her 8-month-old son, Praise, alone.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 4:05 pm

Christina Asima seems tired for a 13-year-old. I meet the shy-mannered girl in the remote farming village of Chitera, in the southern African nation of Malawi. She wears a bright pink zip-up shirt and a blue print cloth wrapped up to her chest. Snuggled in that, hugging her side, is a chubby-cheeked baby boy.

My gut assumption is that the infant must be Christina's little brother. I know 8-month-old Praise is actually her son. Still, it's startling when, as we speak, she shifts him around front to nurse.

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Parallels
6:16 am
Mon November 25, 2013

World Headlines: Both Honduran Candidates Claim Victory

The National Party's Juan Orlando Hernandez in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Sunday. With a little less than half the ballots counted, Hernandez had 34 percent of the vote and was leading, but his main rival is also claiming victory.
Gustavo Amador EPA /LANDOV

Honduras, El Heraldo

Both candidates in Honduras' presidential election are claiming victory, a day after millions voted in an election that was expected to be close.

But with more than half the votes counted, Juan Orlando, of the ruling National Party, is ahead with about 34 percent of the votes. His main rival, Xiomara Castro, the wife of deposed leader Manuel Zelaya, has about 28 percent.

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Middle East
3:22 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Challenges Predicted For Next Round Of Iran Nuclear Talks

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 11:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As we've heard elsewhere in the program, the nuclear agreement reached with Iran over the weekend is a temporary deal with a six-month timeline. There are plenty of unresolved issues and possibly tougher negotiations to come. NPR's Peter Kenyon has this look ahead.

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Latin America
3:07 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Ruling Party Leads Election Vote Totals In Honduras

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 11:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Central American country of Honduras held a presidential election yesterday. Honduras suffers from extreme poverty and it has one of the world's highest murder rates. The nation's politics have been dominated by elites and the military. Now, so far the vote count appears to favor the candidates from the right wing ruling party, but this election offered a little more choice than usual. Here's NPR's Carrie Kahn.

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Middle East
3:07 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Does Nuclear Deal With Iran Go Far Enough?

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 6:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Monday, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

In 34 years of confrontation between Iran and the outside world, there's never been a deal quite like this.

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Middle East
3:07 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Deal Leaves Iran's Nuclear Facilities Intact

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 11:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's talk more about the Iranian nuclear deal with Tony Blinken. He is the White House Deputy National Security Advisor. Mr. Blinken, welcome back to the program.

TONY BLINKEN: Thanks for having me.

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Food
3:01 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

How Johnnie Walker Is Chasing The World's Middle Class

Johnnie Walker's success has come in part from emerging markets, like Mexico, Brazil and China.
Charley Gallay Getty Images for Johnnie Walker

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 9:39 am

Johnnie Walker Scotch Whisky is just about everywhere. You can find the distinctive square bottle in bars, liquor stores and supermarkets from Milwaukee to Mumbai.

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Vatican Puts St. Peter's Bones On Display For The First Time

For the first time in nearly 2,000 years, relics of St. Peter the apostle (fragments of bone) are displayed for veneration.
Franco Origlia Getty Images

In the Vatican today, a surreal scene:

That's Pope Francis, the 266th Bishop of Rome, holding what the church believes are the bone fragments of St. Peter, the apostle and the first bishop of Rome.

Pope Francis cradled the relics during a mass at St. Peter's Square, which marked the end of the global church's Year of Faith. It was also the first time the Catholic Church has displayed the relics in public.

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Middle East
9:25 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Iranians Hope For Normalcy After Nuclear Agreement

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

Iranians are used to bad news, so word of an international deal to halt the nation's nuclear program and the lifting of some sanctions was something extraordinary. Host Rachel Martin speaks with New York Times Tehran Bureau Chief Thomas Erdbrink.

Middle East
9:25 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Israel Slams Iran Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 6:37 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Israel has already criticized this deal. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejected the agreement as a historic mistake. As NPR's Emily Harris reports from Jerusalem, Israel will keep a military option on the table.

EMILY HARRIS, BYLINE: Prime Minister Netanyahu not only called this deal a historical mistake, he said the world is in more danger now than before the agreement was signed.

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Middle East
9:25 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Syrian Human Rights Defender Honored

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now to the war in Syria, where the regime of President Bashar al-Assad has gained ground against rebel fighters in recent weeks, shifting the outlook on the battlefield. According to activists, government warplanes struck rebel positions in northern Syria this weekend. At least 40 people were killed. These military advances, along with cooperation in dismantling its chemical weapons arsenal, make it harder to imagine that the regime will fall.

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Middle East
9:25 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Agreement Reached To Limit Iran's Nuclear Program

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Latin America
6:23 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Amid Crime And Poverty, Hondurans Go To The Polls

Honduran presidential candidate Xiomara Castro greets supporters during a campaign rally in Tegucigalpa last week.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

Voters go to the polls in Honduras to elect a new president on Sunday. It's the first open election with all parties participating since a coup overthrew the left-leaning government in 2009.

The elections come at a difficult time for the longtime U.S. ally. Two-thirds of its people live in poverty, unemployment is soaring and the murder rate is one of the highest in the world due to drug traffickers and gang violence.

The Gang Tax

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Afghanistan
6:23 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Afghan Assembly Approves Security Plan, But Karzai Delays

Afghan President Hamid Karzai attends the Loya Jirga in Kabul on Sunday.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

A grand assembly of Afghan tribal elders and civil society leaders — the Loya Jirga — resoundingly approved an agreement to allow 3,000-9,000 U.S. troops to stay in the country after the NATO mission ends next year.

However, it remains unclear when — or if — President Hamid Karzai will sign the agreement.

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Parallels
3:41 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Spain Has Been In The 'Wrong' Time Zone For 7 Decades

German Chancellor Adolf Hitler, talks with Spain's Generalissimo Francisco Franco, in Hendaye, France, October 23, 1940, in Hitler's railway carriage. Later, Franco moved Spain's clocks ahead an hour to be aligned with Nazi Germany.
AP

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:31 am

It was 1940 and World War II was raging. Nazi Germany occupied Norway, Holland, Belgium, then France. Fascist Italy had already joined with Adolf Hitler. The Fuhrer wanted Spain's support next.

So on Oct. 23, 1940, Hitler took a train to the Spanish border to woo Spain's Fascist dictator, Francisco Franco.

But Spain was in ruins from its own Civil War in the late 1930s, and Franco didn't have much to offer. He stayed neutral, but switched Spain's clocks ahead one hour, to be in line with Nazi Germany.

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Afghanistan
3:14 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

In Afghanistan, Tribal Elders Get A Say In Security Pact With U.S.

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 5:15 pm

In Afghanistan, a grand assembly of some 2,500 tribal elders, politicians and civil society elites are meeting to decide whether to approve a security agreement with the United States. Approval by the grand assembly, called a loya jirga, would be in addition to the OK of the Afghan government. But as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has noted, the agreement can't go forward without the backing of the Afghan people. The security agreement would allow as many as 9,000 U.S. troops to remain in Afghanistan after the current NATO mission ends next year.

Business
2:21 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Electric Bus Fleet Brings Chinese Manufacturing To America

BYD's North American headquarters is located in Los Angeles. Next year, the Chinese-based auto manufacturer will roll out electric buses in LA and Long Beach.
Daniel Hajek NPR

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 5:15 pm

Public transit vehicles may be the key to China's success in the U.S. auto market. Chinese company BYD, based in Shenzhen, is manufacturing electric buses. It's an appealing option for a place like California, where emission standards are strict.

At BYD's North American headquarters in Los Angeles, one of the 40-foot electric K9 buses sits on display. BYD Fleet Sales Manager James Holtz sits in the driver's seat and pushes the power button on the dashboard.

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The New And The Next
2:21 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Building Eco-Friendly Instruments, Paths For Women In Tech

Jared Frazer

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 2:35 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

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The Salt
11:46 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Pepsi Pressured To Fight Big Sugar's 'Land Grab'

Tractors sit on a sugarcane plantation on the land of a Guarani-kaiowá indigenous community in Brazil.
Tatiana Cardeal Courtesy Oxfam

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 10:15 am

The anti-poverty group Oxfam is asking Pepsi's shareholders to approve a resolution that, if passed, would force the company to disclose its sugar suppliers and investigate whether those suppliers are implicated in "land grabs" that unfairly take land from the poor.

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Sat November 23, 2013

John Kerry Joins Iran Nuclear Talks In Geneva

Secretary of State John Kerry arrives at the Geneva International airport in Geneva, Switzerland, on Saturday.
Denis Balibouse AP

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 12:22 pm

Once again raising expectations that a deal over Iran's nuclear program is at hand, Secretary of State John Kerry joined the foreign ministers of the U.K., Russia, China, France and Germany in Geneva to try to hammer out an agreement that would curb Iran's nuclear work in exchange for the loosening of some sanctions.

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Parallels
5:35 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Once Victims Of Stalin, Ukraine's Tatars Reassert Themselves

A Crimean Tatar man cries at a mass rally held in Simfropol, Ukraine, on May 18, 2004, the 60th anniversary of the deportation of Tatars from Crimea.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 9:18 am

In 1944, on the orders of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, the entire population of Tatars on the Crimean Peninsula was rounded up and sent to the deserts of Soviet Central Asia.

Nearly 70 years after that wartime atrocity, the Tatar population is still working to reassert itself in its homeland.

Mullah Ziyatdin, 82, was just 12 when he and his family were rousted in the middle of the night, ordered to gather a few belongings and shoved into freight cars for a nightmarish three-week journey. The freight-car doors were opened every few days.

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The Salt
4:47 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Ancient Wine Bar? Giant Jugs Of Vino Unearthed In 3,700-Year-Old Cellar

Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C.
Eric H. Cline Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 2:06 pm

It looks like our ancestors from the Bronze Age were way bigger lushes than we had ever realized.

Archaeologists have discovered a personal wine cellar in a palace that dates back to 1700 B.C. It's the oldest cellar known, and the personal stash was massive.

More than 500 gallons of wine were once stored in a room connected to the palace, located in modern-day northern Israel, scientists said Friday at a conference in Baltimore. That's enough vino to fill 3,000 wine bottles — or a seven-person hot tub.

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Asia
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Two Weeks After Typhoon, Philippines Sees Signs Of Normal Life

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

It's been two weeks since the typhoon devastated Tacloban city in the Philippines. Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy is in Tacloban overseeing U.S. military relief efforts in the Philippines, and he says the city is picking up the pieces, businesses are re-opening and he sees signs up hope in the residents. Kennedy gives Melissa Block an update on the state of affairs in the country.

NPR Story
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Old Political Feud In Philippines Fuels Rage Over Typhoon Response

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

While international relief efforts in the Philippines are in high gear, efforts by the Philippine government have been hampered. There are bitter rivalries among the country's political clans. And two major political families - including that of the president - are sparring over the response to the disaster. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has that story.

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Music
1:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Jazz Legend Sandoval: Music 'Keeps You Alive'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we take a moment to highlight and salute another artist. Jazz-great Arturo Sandoval received the Presidential Medal of Freedom this week from President Obama. Sandoval was born and raised in Cuba, where he was once jailed just for listening to jazz music. So he packed up his trumpet and moved to the United States. A country he says gave him the freedom to fill the air with his music. Here's what the president said about him at the ceremony.

(SOUNDBITE OF CEREMONY)

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World
1:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Do Sanctions Really Work?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we visit the Barbershop and ask the guys to reflect on the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination in Dallas. That's in just a few minutes.

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Parallels
12:06 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

British Case Points To Hidden Nature Of Modern Slavery

A pedestrian walks along Lambeth Road in south London on Friday. Police have rescued three women from a home in the neighborhood. They were held hostage for some 30 years, according to authorities.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 1:40 pm

We told you last month about a report that estimated that nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide.

That report by the Walk Free Foundation said that India has the most slaves (between 13.3 million and 14.7 million people), while Britain is among the countries with the fewest.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Norway's Magnus Carlsen Is New Chess World Champion

Norway's Magnus Carlsen smiles at a news conference after clinching the FIDE World Chess Championship Friday in Chennai, India, on Friday.
Babu Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

In Norway, it's "Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, all of the great days" rolled into one: That's because 22-year-old Magnus Carlsen has beaten the defending champion, India's Viswanathan Anand, to be crowned chess world champion.

The world No. 1's victory Friday over Anand, the world No. 8 and an Indian fan favorite, came after 10 games in Chennai, India. Carlsen won three and drew seven, and earned the highest rating of all time with the 6.5-3.5 win.

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