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A five-hour drive southwest of Madrid, I pull into a tiny town square filled with songbirds and an outsized Catholic church — where Eduardo Sousa and Diego Labourdette are waiting.

They're an odd couple. Sousa is a jovial fifth-generation Spanish farmer. Labourdette is a soft-spoken academic — an ecologist and migratory bird expert — who teaches at a university in Madrid. But they're in business together — in the foie gras business.

The president of Taiwan has apologized for her country's treatment of aboriginal people.

"If we wish to declare ourselves as a country of one people, we need to face these historical facts. We have to face the truth," Tsai Ing-wen said Monday, according to The Associated Press. She offered a "fullest apology" on behalf of her government.

The Pentagon says U.S. warplanes began attacking Islamic State targets in Libya today at the request of the U.N.-backed Libyan government. The airstrikes are in the city of Sirte, which is controlled by ISIS.

American aircraft destroyed a tank and two ISIS vehicles that the Pentagon says posed a threat to Libyan fighters trying to retake the city.

Pope Francis says it is wrong to equate violence with Islam, adding that "I do not believe that it is true or right that Islam is terrorist."

On a flight back to the Vatican after a five-day visit to Poland, Francis was asked by a reporter about remarks he made following last week's attack on a church in northern France in which an elderly priest was brutally murdered. The reporter asked the pope why he refers to terrorists but never to Islam when talking about such violent incidents.

Mix swimming and basketball with soccer, toss in some wrestling for good measure, and you have a pretty good description of the exciting, fast-paced sport of water polo.

The U.S. women's water polo team is ranked No. 1 in the world and is considered the favorite to bring home the gold medal at the Rio Olympics.

Since women's water polo became an Olympic sport in 2000, the U.S. women have medaled every time, and they won their first gold in London four years ago.

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The Australian Olympic team has had a difficult week.

First, upon arrival at the Olympic Village, delegation head Kitty Chiller said their allotted building was not "safe or ready" to receive the athletes.

In a show of solidarity, Muslims across France are attending Catholic Mass on Sunday after the brutal murder of a priest.

Two men attacked a church in the small town of Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray near Rouen on Tuesday, and slit 85-year-old Jacques Hamel's throat, as we reported. The attack was later claimed by the Islamic State through its Aamaq news agency.

Japanese voters have elected Yuriko Koike, 64, as the capital's first female governor. She's taking the helm after her predecessor resigned following a funding scandal, amid high-pressure preparations for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

She triumphed over two main rival candidates. And while vote counting is still ongoing, Japanese state broadcaster NHK reports that she is "certain to win" based on exit polls.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has launched a shakeup of the country's armed forces and dismissed nearly 1,400 more military personnel in the wake of a failed coup attempt earlier this month. The decree also closes Turkey's military schools.

It may be cloudy and cold, with stones rather than sand underfoot, but the English seaside could get an unexpected boost this summer — courtesy of the Brexit.

Britain's June vote to leave the European Union has depressed the value of the British pound, and is likely to make Britons' airline tickets more expensive for summer vacations. So many are opting for "staycations" instead.

"In my circle of friends, I suspect many people will stay in the U.K. as opposed to going abroad," says Matthew Kirk, 42, who works in IT in London.

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#NPRreads: These 3 Stories Are A Real Catch

Jul 30, 2016

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the#NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

Three weeks after authorities identified 25-year-old Micah Johnson as the shooter who killed five policemen in Dallas, the military has released new details about his bizarre behavior while serving in Afghanistan.

According to a 2014 military investigation, Johnson stole underwear from an unnamed female service member and repeatedly sexually harassed her. In his sleeping bag, the military found grenade launcher ammunition and prescription medication belonging to a fellow soldier.

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Travel NIghtmare: Monkey Business

Jul 30, 2016
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As the presidential campaign heads into its final months, the U.S. is carrying out daily air sorties in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. A major trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, waits in limbo. The U.S. has begun a long-term pivot to Asia and is bringing more Syrian refugees into the country.

In Rwanda, some consider feminism a dirty word, says NPR's Gregory Warner in his Invisibilia podcast. It's shorthand for too aggressive, too liberated, too selfish. Yet women in Rwanda hold 64 percent of the seats in parliament — more than any other country.

You know the TV game show Who Wants to be a Millionaire? Typically, winners get big money — like $1 million — but it's a little different in the version played in Venezuela.

The United Nations suspended food and relief aid to dangerous and hard-to-access areas in northeastern Nigeria, amid a catastrophic humanitarian crisis affecting half a million people. The move comes after Boko Haram ambushed a humanitarian convoy.

Save the Children said a maternity hospital it supports in the rebel-held Syrian province of Idlib has been hit by an apparent airstrike. The charity said in a statement that it's the only such hospital for more than 40 miles.

Russia is indignant about allegations that it was involved in hacking the Democratic National Committee and releasing thousands of embarrassing emails through WikiLeaks.

Democrats have charged that the exploit was designed to hurt Hillary Clinton's campaign and favor Donald Trump's. Russia denies any involvement, but the incident helps shed light on how Russia's political establishment perceives the two major-party presidential nominees.

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