World News

Asia
4:11 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Southeast Asia Nations To Meet To Discuss Migrant Crisis

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 11:13 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
4:10 am
Thu May 28, 2015

After Arrests, Calls For Soccer's Governing Body To Be Overhauled

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:01 am
Thu May 28, 2015

The Very Strange Life Of Nepal's Child Goddess

Nepal's Living Goddess, the Kumari Devi, 9, observes a chariot festival in Kathmandu on March 29. The goddess is worshipped by both Hindus and Buddhists. She's selected as a young child and lives an isolated and secretive existence and is rarely seen in public. Her historic home survived last month's earthquake with only minor cracks. She's being held by her caretaker Gautam Shakya.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 9:45 pm

Last month's earthquake brought much of Kathmandu's historic Durbar Square, a World Heritage Site, tumbling to the ground. Nepal's showcase temples and palaces were reduced to ruins. But save for a few cracks, the home of the city's Living Goddess remained intact.

Largely unknown to the outside world, Nepal's centuries-old institution of the child deity, the Kumari Devi, is deeply embedded in the culture of Kathmandu Valley. Young, beautiful and decorous, even a glimpse of her is believed to bring good fortune.

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Goats and Soda
1:30 am
Thu May 28, 2015

How The World's Largest Refugee Camp Remade A Generation Of Somalis

Somali children dance in the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya.
Fairfax Media Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 2:38 pm

The world's largest refugee camp is also a giant social experiment.

Take hundreds of thousands of Somalis fleeing a war. Shelter them for 24 years in a camp in Kenya run by the United Nations. And offer different opportunities than they might have had if they'd stayed in Somalia.

The Kenyan government wants the experiment to end β€” soon. It's pushing the refugees to return to their home in Somalia, though the camp called Dadaab is the only home many have known.

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The Two-Way
5:44 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Danish Broadcaster Says Killing Of Rabbit On Air Highlighted Hypocrisy

This rabbit wasn't the one killed in Denmark.
Dean Fosdick AP

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:49 pm

A Danish radio station says a host who killed a 9-week-old rabbit during a live debate on animal welfare and later cooked and ate it wanted to "stir a debate about the hypocrisy when it comes to perceptions of cruelty towards animals." But not everyone is buying that argument amid demands for Asger Juhl, the host, to be fired for "shameless self-promotion."

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Sports
3:31 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Soccer Fans In Latin America React To FIFA Corruption Charges

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
2:50 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Iraqi Forces Prepare To Reclaim Ramadi From Islamic State

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 1:27 pm

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Law
2:45 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

U.S. Justice Department Files Corruption Charges Against FIFA

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
2:33 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Aaron Davidson, Miami Sports Marketing Executive, Charged In FIFA Inquiry

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:11 pm

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Sports
2:33 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Indictments Raise Questions About Sepp Blatter's Reign Over FIFA

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:11 pm

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Europe
4:35 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Chechen Leader Is A Hero Or A Villain Depending On The Movie

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:54 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The leader of the Russian Republic of Chechnya claims that he'll soon star in a Hollywood-style action movie. He's already the central figure in another film, a documentary accusing him of human rights abuses. NPR's Corey Flintoff reports.

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NPR Story
3:04 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Officials Of Soccer's Governing Board Arrested On Corruption Charges

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 3:40 pm

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Asia
3:04 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Indians Wait For Prime Minister Modi's Promises Of Better Days

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 12:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:07 am
Wed May 27, 2015

U.S. Indicts 14 In FIFA Corruption Inquiry

The FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland. On Wednesday, Swiss police raided a Zurich hotel to detain top FIFA officials as part of a U.S. investigation into corruption.
Philipp Schmidli Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 12:08 am

Updated at 2:50 p.m. ET

Arrest and search warrants have been executed against senior FIFA officials and several executives for what the Justice Department says was a corrupt scheme that gleaned "well over $150 million in bribes and kickbacks" over the course of 24 years.

The department announced that it has indicted 14 people from the U.S. and South America β€” including nine senior officials with FIFA, soccer's international governing body. Seven of the FIFA officials were arrested in Switzerland early Wednesday.

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Goats and Soda
1:32 am
Wed May 27, 2015

As Antibiotic Resistance Spreads, WHO Plans Strategy To Fight It

Patients receive treatment at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, India. The country has one of the highest rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the world, in part because antibiotics for the disease are poorly regulated by the government.
Dar Yasin AP

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 1:36 pm

The world is losing some of the most powerful tools in modern medicine. Antibiotics are becoming less and less effective at fighting infections. The problem has gotten so bad that some doctors are starting to ponder a "post-antibiotic world."

Common infections that have been easily treatable for decades could become deadly if the current growth of antimicrobial resistance continues.

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The Two-Way
5:28 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Heat Wave Claims More Than 750 Lives In India

An Indian farmer sits Tuesday in his dried-up land in Gauribidanur village, in southern India's Karnataka state. More than 750 people have died in a heat wave that has swept across the country.
Jagadeesh NV EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 2:23 pm

More than 750 people are dead in India in a heat wave that has seen temperatures in some parts of the country touching 118 degrees.

Most of the deaths have occurred in southern Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. The Associated Press reports that more than 550 people have died in Andhra Pradesh since May 13; the number is 215 in Telangana since April 15. Indian news sites say the toll has exceeded 1,000.

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The Salt
4:03 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Sip It Slowly, And Other Lessons From The Oldest Tea Book In The World

A range of Darjeeling tea at Goomtee Tea Estate in Darjeeling, India.
Jeff Koehler for NPR

At least 2,500 years ago, tea, as we know it, was born.

Back then, it was a medicinal concoction blended with herbs, seeds and forest leaves in the mountains of southwest China. Gradually, as manners of processing and drinking tea were refined, it became imbued with artistic, religious, and cultural notes. Under the Tang Dynasty (AD 618–907), the apogee of ancient Chinese prosperity, the drink involved ritual, etiquette and specific utensils. During this period of splendor, the first book dedicated solely to tea was written by Lu YΓΌ.

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Media
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Trial Of 'Washington Post' Reporter Jason Rezaian Begins In Iran

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 4:31 pm

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World
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

U.S., Turkey Divided On Support For Rebel Forces In Syria

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 5:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Tripoli's Niemeyer Fairground Recalls Happier Times Before Civil War

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 4:31 pm

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Asia
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Death Toll Rises To 750 As Heat Wave Sweeps Through India

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 4:31 pm

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Goats and Soda
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Blind Waiters Give Diners A Taste Of 'Dinner In The Dark' In Kenya

At the "Dinner in the Dark" restaurant that's just opened in Nairobi, a blind waiter leads guests to their table. The photo was taken during a training session β€” that's why the lights are on.
Courtesy of is Eatout.co.ke

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 12:07 pm

Ignatius Agon practices his greeting: "OK, good evening ladies and gentlemen. My name is Ignatius and I am going to guide you into the dark."

It's Monday, and the first day of training for a new restaurant opening this month in Kenya. Diners will be served in the dark. They'll have to find their food with their forks and eat it in a pitch black room.

And the waiters are blind.

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World
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

'Journey To Jihad' Tells Story Of Belgian Teenager Who Joined Islamic State

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 4:31 pm

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Goats and Soda
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

How Worried Should We Be About Lassa Fever?

A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes β€” they're yellow β€” that help the virus infect its host cells.
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 4:31 pm

An unidentified New Jersey man died after returning home from West Africa, where he had contracted Lassa fever, a virus that has symptoms similar to those of Ebola. Federal health officials are treating the case with caution because the virus, which commonly is spread by rodents, can occasionally spread from person to person.

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It's All Politics
3:20 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

What Will The Next President Face On #Day1?

The next president to occupy the Oval Office will confront four seemingly intractable problems: stagnant wages, cybersecurity, violent extremism and federal debt.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 9:20 am

Presidential candidates are doing what they have to do at this point in the campaign season β€” they're raising money and strutting their biographies and electoral viability to voters. We haven't heard much yet about policy papers or what they would actually do if they win. But those policy issues will matter β€” as the campaign picks up steam and especially once the next president steps into the Oval Office on Day 1.

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Goats and Soda
7:58 am
Tue May 26, 2015

New Mothers Get A New Kind Of Care In Rural Nigeria

How can women in rural Nigeria get the care they need? That's what Columbia University graduate students in public health asked residents of Kadawawa, Nigeria.
Courtesy of Alastair Ager and Alissa Pires

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 1:56 pm

How do you help a country struggling to provide quality health care, particularly to its rural citizens?

More doctors would be great. New and better clinics would help. But in some places, community health workers are an important part of the solution.

Community health workers live where they work. They're not trained medical professionals, but they do have "training that is recognized by the health services and national certification authority," according to the World Health Organization.

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The Salt
5:03 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Game For Ancient Grain: Palestinians Find Freekeh Again

In a village outside of Jenin, in the West Bank, Palestinian farmers harvest wheat early and burn the husks to yield the smoky, nutty grain known as freekeh.
Daniella Cheslow for NPR

In early May, Nasser Abufarha drove through the rural farmlands around Jenin in the northern West Bank and noticed the timeless features of village life. Young boys harvested cauliflower bigger than their heads, a sun-beaten old man passed on foot with a hoe propped against his shoulder and middle-aged women strolled to their modest homes on a path between waving wheat fields.

But there was one new element, says Abufarha, a Palestinian-American businessman and the founder of the largest fair trade exporter for Palestinian produce.

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Europe
3:18 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Italy's Berlusconi Discovers Social Media As A Campaign Tool

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi finished serving a tax fraud conviction in March.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 4:33 pm

Italy holds regional elections Sunday, and one politician trying to make a comeback is the scandal-plagued former prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi.

Taking his cue from Italy's digitally savvy young Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Berlusconi has opened an Instagram account, posting more than 60 photos on the first day alone.

We see the 78-year-old media tycoon holding trophies of his soccer team, A.C. Milan; addressing rallies; and posing with his 29-year-old girlfriend, Francesca Pascale β€” as well as hugging his white poodle Dudu.

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Parallels
1:25 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Do Touch The Artwork At Prado's Exhibit For The Blind

A blind visitor to Spain's Prado Museum runs his fingers across a 3-D copy of the Mona Lisa, painted by an apprentice to Leonardo da Vinci.
Ignacio Hernando Rodriguez Courtesy of Prado Museum

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 7:38 am

It's a warning sign at art museums around the world: "Don't touch the artwork."

But Spain's famous Prado Museum is changing that, with an exhibit where visitors are not only allowed to touch the paintings β€” they're encouraged to do so.

The Prado has made 3-D copies of some of the most renowned works in its collection β€” including those by Francisco Goya, Diego Velazquez and El Greco β€” to allow blind people to feel them.

It's a special exhibit for those who normally can't enjoy paintings.

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Asia
2:30 pm
Mon May 25, 2015

In Drought-Ridden Taiwan, Residents Adapt To Life With Less Water

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 4:45 pm

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