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Nearly a week since Kenyans went to the polls to decide their president, the official results of that election remain in dispute. Opposition candidate Raila Odinga, who officially lost to incumbent Uhuru Kenyatta, has vowed to continue fighting what he calls widespread electoral fraud.

"We had predicted they will steal the election, and that's what happened," Odinga told thousands of supporters Sunday in Nairobi's Kibera slum, in his first public speech since the formal results were announced Friday. "We are not done yet. We will not give up."

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Two U.S. service members were killed and five others were injured during combat operations in northern Iraq on Sunday, the military announced in a statement.

The joint task force against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Operation Inherent Resolve, said an investigation has been opened into the incident. According to the statement, initial reports suggest the casualties did not come as a result of "enemy contact."

Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Michael Mullen is warning that tensions with North Korea could easily get "out of control" and blames President Trump's harsh rhetoric for narrowing options.

Speaking on NBC's Meet the Press, Mullen was asked whether the president's bellicose comments on North Korea had made the situation worse.

"It eliminates maneuver space for him because it looks like brinkmanship to me," said Mullen, a retired admiral.

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It's not only North Korea that has been the target of President Trump's rhetoric this week. Late on Friday, Mr. Trump sent a surprising message to the Venezuelan government.

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On Egypt's Mediterranean coast, August should be prime tourist season. But the seaside restaurants in Alexandria are almost empty. Worries over security are keeping a lot of foreign tourists away. But there's a much bigger worry looming: that hotter weather and a disappearing shoreline could make Egypt's prospects even worse.

Scientists generally agree that human-made climate change – the effect of greenhouse gas emissions from things like cars and factories – is making the sea level higher and its waters warmer.

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Watching the escalating tensions between North Korea and the United States closely is Japan. The president had this to say earlier this week.

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Three boys walk through a community forest in the village of Pithauli in southern Nepal. One kicks a soccer ball, the other two carry a goat leg in each hand.

They're on their way to feed white-rumped vulture chicks orphaned after a recent hailstorm.

Vulture "restaurants" have sprung up in Nepal over the past decade to offer safe food to the endangered birds, which lost more than 99 percent of their species population across South Asia over about a decade. The restaurants house and raise rescued vulture babies — and also offer food to wild vultures.

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President Trump is planning to ask his staff to consider investigating Chinese trade practices, senior White House officials said Saturday. The Trump administration is insisting the move isn't tied to heightening tensions with North Korea, but it is inherently connected to complications in the region.

"I don't think we're heading toward a period of greater conflict (with China)," said one White House official. "This is simply business."

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The tiny U.S. territory of Guam came under the international spotlight after North Korea said Wednesday that it's studying whether to launch a missile test toward the island. President Trump responded by escalating the rhetoric.

"Let's see what he does with Guam," Trump said of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un from his golf club in Bedminster, N.J. "If he does something in Guam, it will be an event the likes of which nobody has seen before what will happen in North Korea."

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Updated 10 p.m. ET

President Trump says he is "not going to rule out" military action against Venezuela following President Nicolas Maduro's moves to consolidate power in recent weeks.

"The people are suffering and they are dying. We have many options for Venezuela including a possible military option if necessary," Trump told reporters.

Venezuela's defense minister responded Friday evening that such talk is "craziness."

India has increased a military alert along its eastern border with China, moving troops and weapons into the region amid a weeks-long standoff between the two countries that shows no signs of resolution.

As NPR's Julie McCarthy reported last month, New Delhi and Beijing have been at odds over a strategic region called the Doklam Plateau, which is claimed both by China and by India's tiny ally, Bhutan.

This week saw a dramatic escalation of tensions on the Korean Peninsula. As North Korea promised to engulf the U.S. territory of Guam in "enveloping fire", President Trump tweeted that the U.S. military is "locked and loaded" should North Korea "act unwisely".

The North's missile and nuclear programs have been shrouded in secrecy for years, but recent tests have shed more light on their capabilities. Here is what's currently known.

North Korean missiles can reach the continental United States.

A passenger train smashed into the back of another train outside the Egyptian city of Alexandria on Friday afternoon. More than 40 people died and about 120 others were injured, according to news reports citing Egypt's health ministry.

It was not immediately clear what caused the crash. Egypt's top prosecutor, Nabil Sadek, has summoned railway officials for questioning, and President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi has ordered the formation of a task force to investigate the incident.

Global stock markets ended their worst week in months amid rising tensions between the U.S. and North Korea, though U.S. stock indexes steadied on Friday to close up slightly.

A rising number of Syrians who fled are returning to their homes, with more than 600,000 going back in the first seven months of this year, according to the International Organization for Migration.

The U.N. migration agency says that number is comparable to the number of returns spanning the entire year in 2016.

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