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Marie Etyse left two of her children behind.

She's 29, a widow and has five kids. She has lived in a town in the Dominican Republic for the past nine years.

Like many Haitian migrants, she faces deportation after a law stripped her of her citizenship. Formal deportation could start as early as Aug. 1, so many of these people have already fled to settlement camps in Haiti, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the DR.

Etyse tried to get the required papers to stay in the country.

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The U.S. State Department has taken Malaysia and Cuba off its list of worst human trafficking offenders — which many human rights advocates and U.S. lawmakers say has more to do with politics than facts on the ground.

The department's latest annual Trafficking in Persons Report also upgraded Uzbekistan and Angola, while Belize, Belarus and South Sudan were among 18 nations downgraded this year. Russia, Iran, Eritrea and Algeria are some of the countries that have been on the blacklist for years.

The Trevor Noah countdown has begun. The South African stand-up comedian will begin hosting Comedy Central's Daily Show on Sept. 28. And what better way to get ready than ... by doing comedy.

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U.S. officials are concerned about the recruiting efforts of the self-proclaimed Islamic State, also known as ISIS, as the group has stepped up its online outreach.

One team in southwestern Indiana who opposes the radical Islamist group is taking to the Web to reclaim the message of Islam.

On this day 62 years ago, Fidel Castro launched the attack that marked the start of the Cuban revolution. In the years since, the day has taken on emotional significance for the Cuban people — and for the communist government that celebrates it annually.

The Syrian refugee crisis is getting worse by the day.

Not only are more refugees fleeing into Lebanon, but aid to those who have already arrived is being cut dramatically.

The United Nations World Food Program earlier this month slashed the monthly food subsidy for Syrian refugees in Lebanon to just $13.50 per person. Less than a year ago the figure was $30 per person per month. The reason for the decision was reportedly a budget shortfall.

British cyclist Chris Froome rode to his second Tour de France win in just three years on Sunday, edging out his toughest rival, Colombian Nairo Quintana.

Syrian President Bashar Assad, in his first public address in a year, acknowledged that government forces had lost territory to rebels and needed more troops, but he vowed to crush the insurgency that has threatened to topple him.

Assad admitted that his generals have had to shift forces from one front to another to defend key territory and that the loss of some areas have caused "frustration" among ordinary Syrians.

Weeks after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman allegedly got inside help in a daring escape from a maximum-security prison in Mexico, a Mexican federal judge has ordered three officials who worked in the facility's monitoring center at the time of the jailbreak to be formally taken into custody.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

As President Obama was in Kenya to discuss the threat from Islamist extremists, in neighboring Somalia at least 10 people were killed in a suicide car bomb by militants of al-Shabab – the extremist group considered the region's biggest danger.

President Obama, wrapping up his three-day visit to Kenya, urged the east African country to "choose the path to progress" by tackling corruption, eliminating income inequality and promoting gender equality.

"I'm here as president of a country that sees Kenya as an important partner. I'm here as a friend who wants Kenya to succeed," he said in a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in Nairobi.

"You can choose the path to progress, but it requires making some important choices," he said in the 40-minute speech that was broadcast on Kenyan television.

Obama Wraps Up Trip To Kenya

Jul 26, 2015
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In a dry goods shop in the middle of Tel Aviv, plump sacks of dried lemons and spices practically spill out onto the street. There are signs everywhere handwritten in Farsi. It might as well be Tehran.

The owner, Behruz Baradarian, moved to Israel 30 years ago from the Iranian capital. He's one of about 100,000 Iranian Jews who have made Israel their home. And no one feels more torn about the enmity between the two countries than Israel's Iranian Jewish community.

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If you take a yoga class in the U.S., the teacher will most likely say namaste at the end of the practice. It's a Sanskrit phrase that means "I bow to you." You place hands together at the heart, close your eyes and bow.

That's not the namaste I know.

Editor's Note: Reporter Joanna Kakissis was born in Greece but grew up in the U.S. She returned to Greece in 2010 just as the economic meltdown was beginning. She describes what it's like to cover a story that often feels very personal.

I live in a central Athens neighborhood that some describe as run-down, a term I still think is inaccurate and incomplete, applied by drive-by visitors from well-to-do suburbs and fellow journalists looking for a neighborhood to set the stage for a story about Greece's post-austerity impoverishment.

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Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Britain's Pearson PLC — just days after announcing it would sell The Financial Times — has made public that it is engaged in talks to dump its 50 percent stake in The Economist Group.

"Pearson confirms it is in discussions with The Economist Group Board and trustees regarding the potential sale of our 50 percent share in the group," the company said in a statement on Saturday. "There is no certainty that this process will lead to a transaction."

Syrian medical student Hazem Halabi has become an expert on chlorine as a weapon of war. He made his first investigation in April 2014, after an alleged attack on the village of Kafr Zeta in northern Syria.

Villagers reported waking up before dawn to the buzz of helicopters and an overpowering smell of bleach. A video recorded at a local clinic shows doctors struggling to treat panicked victims struggling for breath.

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