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A controversial political action committee aligned with Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser is being shut down amid concerns that it was feeding a pay-to-play political culture in the nation's capital.

FreshPAC's treasurer, Ben Soto, said in an email that the group had become "too much of a distraction for the mayor."

Founded by supporters of the Democratic mayor, the group took advantage of a little-known campaign-finance law that allows PACs to raise unrestricted donations in nonelection years.

U.S. agents have arrested two nephews of Venezuela's first lady for allegedly trying to smuggle 800 kilograms of cocaine into the United States, according to published reports.

Efrain Antonio Campo Flores and Francisco Flores de Freitas were arrested in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Tuesday night, after arriving in the country on a private plane, according to former DEA official Michael Vigil, as quoted by The Associated Press.

The Food and Drug Administration is seeking your input to answer a question: How should the agency define "natural" on food labels?

Disagreement over what "all natural" or "100 percent natural" means has spawned dozens of lawsuits. Consumers have challenged the naturalness of all kinds of food products.

For instance, can a product that contains high fructose corn syrup be labeled as natural? What about products that contain genetically modified ingredients?

A street drug made of various chemicals sprayed on tea leaves, grass clippings and other plant material continues to send thousands of people suffering from psychotic episodes and seizures to emergency rooms around the country.

In 2015, calls to poison control regarding the drug already have almost doubled, compared to last year's total, and health professionals and lawmakers are struggling to keep up with the problem.

It's Veterans Day in the U.S. and Armistice Day in much of Europe, a holiday that has its roots in the end of World War I.

President Obama visited Arlington National Cemetery Wednesday, where Marines in dress uniform lined the road leading to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Obama placed a wreath at the tomb to honor America's fallen veterans, before moving to an amphitheater for a ceremony that included honor guards from America's wars.

The president said:

Results are in from the first year of a bold change to the way hospitals get paid in Maryland, and so far the experiment seems to be working.

We recently reported on the unique system the state is trying to rein in health care costs. Maryland phased out fee-for-service payments to hospitals in favor of a fixed pot of money each year.

Abuse of older people, which can take the form of sexual or emotional abuse, physical violence and financial manipulation, affects at least 10 percent of older Americans, according to a review article published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Tim Wolfe is not the first college administrator to come under fire for responding poorly to campus racism. And Wolfe, until this week the head of the University of Missouri System, isn't likely to be the last.

College presidents who have themselves been in crisis have learned there's a right way — and a wrong way — to respond.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: I'm Sam Sanders in Lynchburg, Va., with Ben Carson. The candidate spoke this morning at the Christian Liberty University. For Carson, it was a safe space. Former prisoner of war George Rodgers introduced him this way.

Dr. Roberta Miller hits the road at 8 a.m. to see her patients.

Many are too old or sick to go to the doctor. So the doctor comes to them.

She's put 250,000 miles on her Honda minivan going to their homes in upstate New York. Home visits make a different kind of care possible.

Here in Pall Mall, Tenn., you can walk up on the front porch of the Forbus General Store, est. 1892, and still hear Alvin C. York's rich Tennessee accent.

Every day, the older neighbors gather on the store's front porch.

"My grandfather used to cut Sgt. Alvin York's hair," Richard West recalls. "He would pay a quarter. He was a big man, redheaded."

Expert groups differ on when and how often women should have mammograms. So many groups now say that a woman in her 40s should talk to her doctor about the pros and cons of mammography as well as her individual risk in order to make the decision that's right for her.

Except that none of my 40-something friends I've spoken with have had that kind of conversation with a physician. Instead they've heard: "You're 40, here's a prescription for a mammogram." End of discussion.

Less than two days after students at the University of Missouri successfully forced the resignation of the school's chancellor and the university system president, police say they have arrested a 19-year-old suspected of issuing threats against black students.

University of Missouri Police say they arrested Hunter M. Park, who is white, early Wednesday for allegedly making threats against black students. Park, police say, is not a student at the university.

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Plane Crashes Into Residential Area In Akron, Ohio

Nov 10, 2015

Authorities confirm at least two people died Tuesday when a chartered jet crashed into a small apartment house, in Akron, Ohio. Another house nearby caught fire.

No one on the ground is reported injured.

The plane went down as it approached a general aviation airport.

Tim Rudell of member station WKSU reports for NPR's Newscast desk that, unofficially, nine people are believed dead:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Brian Kratzer's students had a singularly complex assignment in recent days: They had to cover the protests at the University of Missouri's flagship campus in Columbia at a time when those protests had turned singularly hostile to coverage — and reporters. Astonishingly, some of those most hostile turned out to be on the university's faculty and staff.

New York state's attorney general has ordered the two biggest daily fantasy sports companies to stop accepting bets there. He says those games constitute illegal gambling under state law.

In making the announcement, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says the games "cause the same kinds of social and economic harm as other forms of illegal gambling" and mislead consumers:

Some economic matters are stunningly complex. Take the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The trade deal's details cover more than 6,000 pages.

Others are simple, like the federal minimum wage. A bill to raise the $7.25 hourly wage covers a few paragraphs.

The congressional response is simple, too: Democrats are for it; Republicans against.

In football, a sport that demands military-style discipline and singular focus, there's ample precedent for speaking out against the status quo.

What happened at the University of Missouri in recent days, with African-American football players calling for a boycott with the support of coaches, is dramatic, but it's the kind of action that was quite common around 50 years ago, according to historian Lane Demas, a professor at Central Michigan University.

The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a case testing whether the government can freeze a defendant's legitimately obtained assets, thus preventing the accused from hiring a lawyer.

Sila Luis, the owner of Miami home health care companies, was indicted on Medicare fraud charges in 2012. She has been detained at her home for two years while her case wended its way to the Supreme Court. She wants to use some of her assets to hire a lawyer for her trial.

The official statistics for shootings by police in America are bad to non-existent. The totals are under-reported, and the Justice Department admits it doesn't have crucial details such as the race of people shot, and whether they were armed.

Since the 2014 protests in Ferguson, Mo., after the police killing of Michael Brown, this lack has become an embarrassment. But that's slowly beginning to change.

One million pieces of gum, some of which are 20 years old, are being melted off the famous "gum wall" in Seattle.

Workers are using steam cleaners to loosen the hardened blobs from the Pike Place Market wall in order to restore the "the character [and] the history of the Market," Pike Place Market Preservation and Development Authority spokeswoman Emily Crawford said last week. The cleaning is slated to take three days to complete.

The chief of the Justice Department's civil rights division says "too many barriers still exist in courts across America" when it comes to providing lawyers to poor criminal defendants.

In a speech to the first-ever National Consortium on the Right to Counsel, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta said, "The bottom line is this: Denying one's Sixth Amendment right to counsel can negatively impact public safety. And it also drains precious taxpayer resources."

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Every Thursday night you can find Nathan Fields making the rounds of Baltimore's red light district, known to locals as The Block.

An outreach worker with the Baltimore City Health Department, Fields, 55, is a welcome sight outside strip clubs like Circus, Club Harem and Jewel Box.

In the early evening before the clubs get busy, he talks with dancers, bouncers and anyone else passing by about preventing drug overdoses and how to stop the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

The word "diversity" gets thrown around a lot in these parts, and recently, it has come under a lot of scrutiny; it's easy to invoke, but what does it actually mean?