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The "E" in Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's newly unveiled presidential logo is a stylized American flag — as it turns out, one that looks remarkably similar to the logo for America's Best Contacts & Eyeglasses.

The company's CEO, Reade Fahs, said he doesn't mind but also that it's unlikely the governor hasn't seen the 18-year-old logo. "It's on hundreds of stores across the country. So assuming he's got good vision, he probably would have spotted it in his campaign travels. And we have lots of stores in Wisconsin too."

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When you've got a bladder infection, the word "urgent" means right now.

Not urgent as in, wait two hours at the urgent care clinic. Not urgent as in, wait some more to get the prescription filled.

So when a doctor says that women should be able to self-prescribe antibiotics for simple urinary tract infections, that sounds like an idea whose time has come.

The iconic forests of the Pacific Northwest — with their towering, moss-covered fir and pine trees — have never been this dry. The grass underneath the ferns has already turned gold.

Of the five large wildfires burning in Washington alone right now, one has scorched more than 1,500 acres of a rainforest on the typically misty Olympic Peninsula.

The wildfire threat in the drought-stricken Pacific Northwest right now is extraordinary, and there are concerns that the region may not be prepared for a long summer.

A Wake-Up Call

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The Iran nuclear deal includes more surveillance at the country's nuclear facilities, something President Obama says will ensure that Iran does not build a bomb.

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There's another video of a police-involved shooting in the news. It comes from Southern California and the small city of Gardena near Los Angeles.

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Today for the last time, soldiers - toy soldiers - opened the doors of a New York City icon.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Are you ready to do it one more time?

(APPLAUSE)

MAN: Guys, come on in. Welcome to FAO.

(APPLAUSE)

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It's not easy for a child who has had mental health issues to make a successful transition into adulthood. But even children who have symptoms that are mild enough that they wouldn't be diagnosed are more likely to struggle with life as adults, a study finds.

It's a little before 8 a.m. when Mathias Schergen pushes open the side door at Chicago's Jenner Elementary Academy for the Arts.

He walks down the hall toward the office to sign in. It's the same routine he's had as Jenner's art teacher for nearly a quarter century.

"It's gonna be a good day," a colleague calls out. "It's a good day."

They hug. It seems like a typical Friday. Except it's not.

After 23 years at Jenner Elementary, Schergen is retiring.

"Is this your last day?" asks a first-grader.

It's a situation that occurs all too often: Someone goes to the emergency room and doesn't learn until he gets a hefty bill that one of the doctors who treated him wasn't in his insurance network. Or a diligent consumer checks before scheduling surgery to make sure that the hospital she plans to use and the doctors who will perform the operation are all in her network. Then she learns later that an assistant surgeon she didn't know — and who wasn't in her network — scrubbed in on her operation, and charged her for it.

Might people with diabetes someday be able to brew their own insulin for free at home, just as with beer? The answer may be yes, but whether it's a good idea is another question.

The home-brewed insulin concept is among the latest to emerge from the bio-hacking movement, in which people meet to tinker with biology in inexpensive do-it-yourself laboratories that have popped up in California, New York and a few other places in the United States and Europe.

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It's mid-July, and winter has finally ended in Boston — at least symbolically. On Tuesday, Boston's mayor announced that the giant pile of dirty snow left over from the city's record-breaking snowfall had finally melted.

The seven-story snow tower took so long to thaw out that there was a citywide contest to guess when it would go away. In response to the news, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker tweeted: "Our nightmare is finally over!"

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington will post a sign Wednesday telling visitors an exhibition that includes art owned by Bill Cosby and his wife, Camille, is "fundamentally about the artworks and the artists who created them, not Mr. Cosby," representatives for the Smithsonian Institution say.

As Dan Charles reported on Monday, yogurt has a way of igniting passions. In his story of arson, the flames were literal.

Once you start looking, it's really not hard to find people — even entire countries — deeply attached to this nourishing and calming food.

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Now reaction from a key Democratic senator. Ben Cardin of Maryland is the ranking minority member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In a statement today, he spoke of Congress's solemn obligation to review this deal.

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We are about to hear from a record-breaker. Scott Jurek's record time was 46 days, eight hours and seven minutes. That's how long it took the ultra-marathoner to hike the 2,189 miles of the Appalachian Trail, which passes through 14 states.

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M.C. DAVIS: I was somewhere to the right of Attila the Hun.

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Exhausted negotiators reached a deal to curb Iran's nuclear program, and now the sales pitches begin in Washington and Tehran. President Obama framed this as a choice between war and peace.

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