U.S. News

Law
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

When Child Migrants Cross The Border, What Next Awaits Them?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The influx of children coming up from Central America, through Mexico and across the U.S. border, has focused attention on U.S. immigration law and how it's applied. We're going to hear now from Dana Leigh Marks, who is an immigration judge. In fact, Judge Marks is president of the National Association of Immigration Judges. She joins us from San Francisco. Welcome to the program.

DANA LEIGH MARKS: Thank you so much for having me.

Read more
Business
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Export-Import Controversy Gives Rise To A Tale Of Two Washingtons

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. A debate has been raging in Washington, D.C. over the future of an obscure federal agency - the Export-Import Bank. And all the way across the country in the other Washington - Washington state - businesses, labor unions and politicians say the bank's demise would have severe consequences. Ashley Gross of member station KPLU in Seattle reports.

Read more
Economy
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

In June Jobs Numbers, Signs For Optimism

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
2:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Immigration Debate Splits California City In Two

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Economy
2:03 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Hiring Looks Good Now, But Wage Growth Lags

A Gap employee works at a store in San Francisco. The company plans to raise its minimum wage in phases to $10 an hour by next year.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 3:12 pm

The unemployment report released Thursday by the Labor Department offered great news for job seekers: Hiring boomed in June.

That good news helped send stock prices to record levels, with the Dow Jones industrial average crossing the 17,000 mark for the first time to close at 17,068.26, up 92.02.

Read more
U.S.
11:50 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Federal Highway Program Could Run Out Of Money Next Month

The White House has warned that without more money for the federal Highway Trust Fund, which helps states pay for road and infrastructure projects, construction delays will put thousands out of work.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:35 pm

Congress has yet another problem it can't solve.

For years, the main federal transportation program has been spending more money than it takes in. This year, the Congressional Budget Office estimates the Transportation Department will disburse $45 billion while collecting only $33 billion for its Highway Trust Fund.

As a result, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx warned states on Tuesday that they will start seeing cuts of 28 percent in federal funding for roads and bridges next month unless Congress comes up with some extra money.

Read more
History
11:41 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Do We Celebrate Independence Day Too Early?

The Fourth of July is a time for firing up the grill and fireworks. But historian Kenneth C. Davis says Americans celebrate it on the wrong day. It's Independence Day trivia, with host Michel Martin.

Barbershop
11:41 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Is Robin Thicke Just A 'Creepy Crooner'? The 'Shop' Guys Weigh In

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Economy
9:14 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Report Shows 288,000 New Jobs In June

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. We begin this hour with more positive signs about the nation's economy. The Labor Department this morning said the U.S. unemployment rate fell to its lowest level in nearly six years last month, and employers added some 288,000 jobs to their payrolls. Here's NPR's Jim Zarroli.

Read more
Politics
4:14 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell takes a tour of the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Townsend, Ga., last week with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge manager Kimberly Hayes.
Stephen B. Morton AP

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:57 pm

It's rare to find Sally Jewell in her Washington, D.C., office.

A little more than a year into her job as Interior Department secretary, she spends much of her time out in the field. It's unavoidable for someone who heads the federal agency that oversees some 400 national parks and nearly 300 million acres of federal lands.

"It's in the job description," she says. "It's also a fun part of the job."

Of late, Jewell has been in the forefront of the administration's efforts to raise awareness of the threat of climate change.

Read more
Intelligence Squared U.S.
3:58 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Is Unlimited Spending On Political Speech A Protected Right?

Burt Neuborne and Zephyr Teachout convinced audience members that the right to unlimited spending on political speech is not guaranteed by the Constitution.
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:05 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

In 2010, the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment protected the right of corporations and unions to spend money on political speech. That decision, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, didn't affect how much money organizations could donate to political campaigns — but it removed limits on how much they could spend themselves.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Arthur Strengthens Into A Hurricane As N.C. Island Orders Evacuation

The five-day forecast track for Arthur.
National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 10:44 am

This post was updated at 5:00 a.m. ET Thursday:

The National Hurricane Center announced Thursday morning that Tropical Storm Arthur has become the Atlantic season's first hurricane. The storm is about 190 miles south-southeast of Cape Fear, N.C., with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph.

In its latest advisory, the National Hurricane Center says Arthur is expected to move near the North Carolina Outer Banks this evening.

Wednesday's Post:

Read more
Men In America
3:51 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Learning How To Be A Man, From Mom

Derek Williams says he learned more about being a man from his mother than his father.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 7:29 am

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Though my mom and dad often were on the outs, I'm not one of those kids whose dad was absent.

Read more
The Salt
3:37 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Big Bucks From Strawberry Genes Lead To Conflict At UC Davis

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 4:26 pm

Yesterday, we reported on a legal tussle over control of the country's top center of strawberry breeding, at the University of California, Davis. But there's a backstory to that battle. It involves the peculiar nature of the UC Davis strawberry program.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:31 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Florida County Goes To Court Over 'Acid Fracking' Near Everglades

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

In southwest Florida, county officials are fighting the state over a new oil drilling process that's known by many different names: acidification, acidizing, acid stimulation and acid fracking.

Collier County has charged that state regulators have been lax in their oversight of the drilling, jeopardizing public health and the environment.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Tensions Eddy In Murrieta After Protesters Turn Back Buses Of Migrants

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Meet A Mayor Facing The Migrant Surge Firsthand

Mayor Jim Darling's McAllen is the first U.S. city that many migrants see after crossing the border. Darling says, "If there's a humanitarian need, we're going to try to meet it."
Doualy Xaykaothao

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
National Security
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Benghazi Suspect Spends A Day In Court

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now the latest on the Benghazi case - the man accused in the attack on the U.S. diplomatic post in Libya, which killed four Americans, appeared in federal court. At the end of a brief hearing, a judge ordered Ahmed Abu Khattala to remain in federal custody. And prosecutors outlined some new details about the violent events that night in September 2012, and of Khattala's alleged role in them. NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson was in the courtroom and she's here with us now to talk about the case. Hi.

Read more
National Security
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Bipartisan Board OKs NSA Surveillance Program, With Suggestions

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
History
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Digital Homestead Records Reopen A Crucial Chapter Of U.S. History

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
2:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

The Brutal Race That Asks Runners To Go Up A Mountain And Back Down

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:43 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Costlier Digital Mammograms May Not Be Better For Older Women

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:07 pm

Medicare spending on breast cancer screening for women age 65 and older has jumped nearly 50 percent in recent years. But the rise in price was not associated with an improvement in the early detection of breast cancer.

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that Medicare spending on breast cancer screening rose from $666 million in the years 2001-2002 to $962 million in the years 2008-2009.

So why the big increases in costs?

Read more
History
10:51 am
Wed July 2, 2014

At 50, The Civil Rights Act Creates 'Opportunities For All Americans'

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Michel Martin speaks with historians Charles Cobb and Taylor Branch about the legacy of the Act and what it accomplished.

Pop Culture
10:51 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Are Robin Thicke's Public Pleas To His Wife Going Too Far?

The R&B singer says is trying to mend his marriage in unconventional ways. Michel Martin speaks with a pop culture panel to get their take on Thicke's methods and other stories of the week.

NPR Ed
8:03 am
Wed July 2, 2014

The Return Of The One-Room Schoolhouse

The West Street Schoolhouse in Southington, Ct., was built around 1760. It was heated with a potbellied wood stove.
National Register of Historic Places

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 11:52 am

Even if your grandpa didn't walk uphill to school both ways, or have to break the ice on the bucket before fetching a drink with the dipper, you probably have iconic images in your mind of the one-room schoolhouse. It's a storied piece of America's past dating back to the Colonial era.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
5:03 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Watch It Swallow An Entire Tree In Seconds

deniscimafinc YouTube

Read more
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:45 am
Wed July 2, 2014

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:15 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:02 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Another Day, Another Reason For Voters To Loathe Congress

The House Ethics Committee dismayed government watchdogs by reducing disclosure requirements for privately paid trips taken by members of Congress.
Matthias Schrader AP

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:25 pm

Congressional approval ratings are at rock bottom. Why would members pull a stunt likely to make them even more unpopular than they already are?

Read more
Code Switch
5:01 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Language Barriers Pose Challenges For Mayan Migrant Children

Hugo Pascual Tomas Manuel, 15, attends English classes at the Guatemalan-Maya Center in Lake Worth, Fla. He grew up speaking Q'anjob'al, or Kanjobal, an indigenous Mayan language.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:43 pm

Among the tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors who have come from Central America this year are children who speak little or no Spanish. Many are from Guatemala's indigenous communities, who speak more than 20 different Mayan languages.

Rafael Domingo, 16, grew up in Guatemala speaking Q'anjob'al, sometimes referred to as Kanjobal. The youngest son of a single mother, he rode a bus, walked for miles and crossed a river before he was stopped at the Texas border.

"It was so difficult to come to this country," Domingo says through an interpreter.

Read more
Code Switch
4:23 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Honolulu Police Chief's Ban On Visible Tattoos Sparks Criticism

Keone Nunes, a Native Hawaiian tattoo artist, says prayers to "awaken" the tattoo tools and bless the ink. Two "stretchers" pull the skin tight on the chest of Kaiola Farin to enable Nunes to tap straight lines.
Wayne Yoshioka Hawaii Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:37 pm

The Honolulu Police Department motto is "integrity, respect and fairness." But many of the Hawaiian natives on the force say the new rule banning visible tattoos isn't fair and doesn't respect their religious customs.

Keone Nunes is a practitioner who taps out tattoo designs just as they were done a thousand years ago. He uses a hand-held tool — a kind of miniature rake with needle-sharp tines made of animal tusks dipped in black ink. Uhi, or the artwork, is secondary to the prayers, protocols and techniques used in the ancient Native Hawaiian practice, he says.

Read more

Pages