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Almost five years ago, soon after the suicide of linebacker Junior Seau, the NFL announced it was donating $30 million to the National Institutes of Health for brain research.

The ripples from President Trump's recent tweet suggesting he could pardon himself continue to billow out into the body politic.

No president in the history of this country has ever pardoned himself, though President Nixon, and perhaps others, may have contemplated it. Presidents Clinton and George H.W. Bush were each under investigation by a special prosecutor as their terms drew to a close, but neither chose to pardon himself.

Bringing A Bookstore To The Bronx

Jul 29, 2017

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Nearly a million and a half people live in the Bronx. And since the end of last year, there hasn't been a single general interest bookstore in the New York City borough to serve them. But a Bronx entrepreneur is working on changing that. From New York, Rick Karr reports.

Preserving Route 66

Jul 29, 2017

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The word empowerment gets tossed around a lot when people talk about young girls. But at Girls Build summer camp in Oregon, girls as young as 8 are learning how to use power tools.

Calling members of the transnational street gang MS-13 "animals" who like to let their victims "die slowly because that way it's more painful," President Trump on Friday sought to highlight his administration's efforts to crack down on illegal immigration, reduce violent crime and secure additional congressional funding for immigration enforcement.

President Trump's White House has been operating so far outside of this country's traditional ethical "norms" that it's been "a shock to the system," Walter Shaub, former director of the Office of Government Ethics, said Friday.

"We are truly in an ethics crisis, and something needs to be done about it," he said at a news conference at the National Press Club.

In body camera footage released by police in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., an officer tells tennis star Venus Williams that she is at fault in a car crash but that he is not going to cite her. "You just got stuck in a bad situation there," he says.

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET

President Trump ended a week defined by White House staff turmoil when he named retired Marine Gen. John Kelly as his new chief of staff on Friday evening.

Trump made the announcement via Twitter.

"He is a Great American and a Great Leader," Trump said. "John has also done a spectacular job at Homeland Security. He has been a true star of my Administration."

Trump also tweeted his thanks to Reince Priebus, who had been his chief of staff since Inauguration Day.

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As speculation continues in Washington over Attorney General Jeff Sessions' future, in his home state, Alabama, there's a raucous race for his former Senate seat. And President Trump is playing a big role in that race. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

He rose from relative state-party obscurity and reached an unlikely pinnacle as the man responsible for the agenda of the president of the United States.

Now, Reince Priebus is out of that job as White House chief of staff in the most significant shake-up of the rocky Trump presidency.

President Trump announced on Twitter on Friday that Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has been named to replace Priebus, who says he resigned Thursday.

The video shows a man knocking over the cart of a Mexican street vendor. It's ignited tensions around street vending, which is both ubiquitous and illegal in LA, and about the racial discrimination vendors say they face face.

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The Senate effort to undo the Affordable Care Act failed dramatically early Friday morning, with Sen. John McCain casting a deciding "no" vote. The promise of repeal has animated the Republican Party for seven years, and the defeat was a devastating loss for the GOP and President Trump.

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Republican Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma talks to NPR's Robert Siegel about why he's disappointed that the health care vote failed. His state has only one insurer available to Oklahomans on the exchange, and premiums have increased an average of 76 percent.

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The CEO of Royal Dutch Shell this week said his company is making a striking shift in its thinking: It now expects oil prices to remain low forever. The global oil glut of recent years shows no sign of diminishing. Energy demand has leveled off. And if electric vehicles take off, oil prices could come under even more downward pressure.

The U.S. economy gained momentum in the second quarter as consumers and businesses picked up their spending. Gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 2.6 percent, an improvement over the first quarter but still not approaching the dynamic economy President Trump promised during the campaign.

A U.S. government venture capital fund supporting efforts to end extreme poverty will stop accepting new grant applications tonight.

Friday's announcement puts a hold on a program that provides seed funding for innovative initiatives like developing low-cost smart tractors in Nigeria and running a peer support group for pregnant women in Nepal.

The human brain knows what it knows. And so, it appears, does a rat brain.

Rats have shown that they have the ability to monitor the strength of their own memories, researchers from Providence College reported this month in the journal Animal Cognition.

Brain scientists call this sort of ability metacognition. It's a concept that became famous in 2002, when then Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld explained to reporters:

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In most conservative media, the Russia story is still fake news even as daily revelations continue to pile up about contacts between Russians and Donald Trump's inner circle.

The tone taken by conservative outlets has had an impact on voters such as the Bauchles from Watkins Glen, N.Y. They believe the whole Russia story is a sham, a political head-fake crafted by Democrats and by the crooked media.

"I don't think there's any basis to it," said Dennis Bauchle, a farmer, during an interview this week.

Every year Patrick Engleman plays a little trick on his students. The high school chemistry teacher introduces his ninth-graders in suburban Philadelphia to an insidious substance called dihydrogen monoxide. It's "involved in 80 percent of fatal car crashes. It's in every single cancer cell. This stuff, it'll burn you," he tells them.

But dihydrogen monoxide is water. He says several of his honors classes decided to ban it based just on what he told them.

It was after 3 a.m. on a Sunday: July 23, 1967. A group of African-Americans were celebrating the return of two Vietnam veterans. They were in what Detroiters call a "blind pig," an after-hours bar, at the corner of 12th Street and Clairmount Avenue. Just before dawn, police raided the bar and began arresting the more than 80 people inside.

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For 25 years, the Rev. Noel Hickie, 74, and Marcia Hilton, 70, helped families during their most trying moments.

Hickie was working as a hospital chaplain and Hilton as a bereavement counselor when the two met at a hospital in Eugene, Ore. The pair often worked together on hospice teams, helping patients and their families through illness and death. They spent decades of their lives doing this work, but in the beginning, neither was sure they were cut out for it.

"I thought that I would never want to be around sick people," Hickie says.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

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