U.S. News

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On The Ground In Orlando

Jun 12, 2016
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The Latest: Orlando Nightclub Shooting

Jun 12, 2016
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Donald Trump has promised to speak Wednesday about, in his words, "the failed policies and bad judgment of Crooked Hillary Clinton."

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'I Won't Feel Safe On My College Campus'

Jun 11, 2016
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What's Next For Sanders Supporters?

Jun 11, 2016
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Stephon Alexander didn't always love music. When he turned 8, his grandmother, who was from Trinidad, forced him to take piano lessons in the Bronx. His teacher was, in a word, strict. "It felt like a military exercise to rob me of my childhood," Alexander recalls.

Several years went by like that. Until one day when Alexander's dad brought home an alto sax he found at a garage sale. "That became my toy. Music no longer for me was this regimented tedium," he says.

A new type of airport security screening lane is being tested in Atlanta, and "initial results show dramatic improvements," according to the head of the Transportation Security Administration.

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

In this week's episode, listeners ask about what to do when plans for that special day go awry. Here, Sad Daughter-In-Law is stuck in a protracted dispute over something as seemingly simple as wedding invitations.


Dear Sugars,

Herring are spawning in a tributary to New York's Hudson River for the first time in 85 years after a dam was removed from the tributary's mouth.

Singer Christina Grimmie, a former contestant on The Voice, was shot by a gunman after a concert in Orlando, Fla., police say, and later died of her wounds.

Orlando Police have identified Grimmie's killer as 27-year-old Kevin James Loibl.

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Few people have the unusual set of professional experiences that Lonny Shavelson does. He worked as an emergency room physician in Berkeley, Calif., for years, while also working as a journalist. He has written several books and takes hauntingly beautiful photographs.

Now he'll add another specialty.

The Week In Sports

Jun 11, 2016
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Muhammad Ali kissed me once.

Don't be a dope — it wasn't like that. It was in front of a whole bunch of people and my then-boyfriend and Mrs. Ali. (And two of his future wives. I'll get to that in a moment.) I was lucky enough to meet him a few times over several decades, but the first time was the most memorable.

Tesla says its cars' suspension systems have no safety problems, and the electric-auto maker calls an allegation that it has pressured customers not to report safety problems "preposterous."

A tense game between Chile and Bolivia brought a moment of soccer glory Friday night: Just three minutes after entering the game, Jhasmani Campos arced a free kick over the wall and into the net, setting off cheers in Foxborough's Gillette Stadium.

Campos used his left foot and just the right blend of spin and power to send the ball into the top corner of the far side of the goal, past Chile's leaping goalkeeper. We'll let you watch it for yourself, in this video posted by Fox Sports.

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During the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. military did an about-face on detecting and treating brain injuries caused by explosions. After years of routinely sending blast-exposed troops back into combat, the military implemented a system that requires screening and treatment for traumatic brain injury.

The change came about in large part because of a remarkable campaign by an elite team of military officers who were also doctors and scientists. They worked for the highest-ranking officer in the armed forces. And they were known simply as the Gray Team.

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