U.S. News

The Two-Way
7:02 am
Thu July 10, 2014

4 Children, 2 Adults Killed In Apparent Domestic Dispute In Texas

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:24 am

This post was updated at 11:10 a.m. ET.

A man suspected in the shooting deaths of four children and two adults surrendered to police in a Houston suburb after a three-hour standoff Wednesday night.

The alleged gunman has been identified as Ronald Lee Haskell, 33, who has been charged with multiple counts of capital murder.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Thu July 10, 2014

From Calif. Teachers, More Nuanced Views On Tenure

Julia Macias, a plaintiff and Los Angeles Unified School District middle school student, comments on the Vergara v. California lawsuit verdict in Los Angeles last month.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:20 am

In the weeks since a California judge overturned the state's rules governing teacher tenure, the political noise has only grown louder. Advocates on both sides of the issues have largely stuck to "give-no-ground," press-release rhetoric that risks drowning out educators in the middle.

I've spoken with educators around the state since the ruling, including many who say they want protections but also real change.

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The Two-Way
5:26 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Hackers In China Reportedly Targeted U.S. Federal Workers

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:01 am

Chinese hackers successfully accessed U.S. government computer networks in March apparently hoping to find information about "tens of thousands of employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances," The New York Times reports.

The newspaper says the attack centered on the Office of Personnel Management was reportedly detected and blocked — but not before the hackers had gotten into some of the agency's databases.

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Law
3:01 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Jailed For 3 Months In Mexico, U.S. Marine Reservist Gets Hearing

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now to another source of tension at the border. A trial began yesterday for a former Marine, who spent the last three months in a Mexican jail. He drove into Tijuana with guns in his car. The Marine, now a reservist, says he took a wrong turn and didn't mean to cross the border. Amy Isackson has the story.

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Around the Nation
3:01 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Rumors Motivate Central American Kids To Set Out For U.S. Border

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Salt
1:29 am
Thu July 10, 2014

From McDonald's To Organic Valley, You're Probably Eating Wood Pulp

You can find wood pulp in several brands of packaged shredded cheese. It helps keep the cheese from clumping.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

Do not be alarmed, but you may be eating wood pulp. Or at least an additive that started out as wood.

If you buy shredded cheeses, including brands such as Organic Valley and Sargento, or hit the drive-through at McDonald's for a breakfast sandwich or a smoothie, or douse some ribs with bottled barbecue sauce, there's likely some cellulose that's been added to your food.

Cellulose is basically plant fiber, and one of the most common sources is wood pulp. Manufacturers grind up the wood and extract the cellulose.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Bingeing On Bad News Can Fuel Daily Stress

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 1:34 pm

If you're feeling stressed these days, the news media may be partly to blame.

At least that's the suggestion of a national survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

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News
6:29 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Obama Turns To Gov. Perry In Seeking A Solution To Border Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:40 pm

After a meeting with Texas Gov. Rick Perry, President Obama addressed the influx of migrant children on the U.S.-Mexico border. He signaled his openness to Perry's solutions, saying he'd consider deploying the National Guard, but also called on Congress to offer solutions of its own.

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Law
5:40 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

For Kids In Immigration Court, Legal Counsel Is Catch As Catch Can

Protesters outside a San Antonio courthouse advocate for legal representation for immigrant children.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups sued the federal government Wednesday for its failure to provide legal representation to immigrant children in deportation proceedings.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Congress Has The Ability To Fix Immigration Crisis, Obama Says

President Obama and Texas Gov. Rick Perry meet in Dallas on Wednesday. They later attended a meeting about the border and immigration together.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 5:57 pm

President Obama said Wednesday that Congress has the ability to address the problem of thousands of unaccompanied children and teenagers illegally crossing the border from Mexico into the U.S.

"Right now, Congress has the capacity to work with us, work with state officials, local officials and faith-based groups and non-for-profits who are helping to care for these kids," he said in Dallas.

Obama added that it is unlikely the minors will be allowed to stay in the U.S.

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It's All Politics
5:01 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Interpreting The IRS Emails, Washington-Style

Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., grills Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen as he testifies June 23 before the House Oversight Committee.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 5:25 pm

Here's the biggest recurring theme in the IRS controversy — the one about alleged targeting of conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status.

Throughout the yearlong investigation, congressional Republicans and Democrats have not only highlighted their own evidence but also taken the same evidence and drawn diametrically opposed conclusions.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

An Actor, A University And A Famous Name Lead To A Lawsuit

John Wayne went by "Duke" nearly all his life, but that's not the name that appeared on his driver's license.
AP

What do you think of when you hear the name Duke? That question is at the heart of a legal dispute between Duke University and the estate of John Wayne.

Fans of the late film star will recall that he went by the nickname "Duke," which his biographers have pointed out he picked up in childhood from a dog. (He preferred it to his real first name, which was Marion).

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Report Says FBI, NSA Spied On American Muslims

Rutgers professor Hooshang Amirahmadi, one of the American Muslims identified by the Intercept as a target of covert surveillance by the FBI and the NSA.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 4:45 pm

Reporters Glenn Greenwald and Murtaza Hussain say, in the online news website Intercept, that based on information provided by Edward Snowden they have evidence that the FBI and NSA used covert surveillance on the email accounts of 202 American Muslims.

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It's All Politics
4:07 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Should President Obama Visit The Texas Border?

Immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally stand in line for bus tickets after their release in June from a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in McAllen, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Much of President Obama's presidency currently falls into the category of damned if he does, damned if he doesn't.

That certainly is true on the question of whether he should visit the U.S.-Mexico border during his two-day visit to Texas.

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Men In America
3:52 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

On Calif. Cattle Ranch, Students Wrangle With Meaning Of Manhood

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

For All Things Considered's "Men in America" series, NPR's Kelly McEvers sent this report on Deep Springs College — the all-male college that her husband attended, and where he and McEvers have both taught.

About a hundred years ago, a man named L.L. Nunn was building power plants in the American West. He wanted a place where workers could be educated — and educated people could do work.

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The Salt
3:35 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Is Foster Farms A Food Safety Pioneer Or A Persistent Offender?

Foster Farms set up new procedures to deal with salmonella contamination after the USDA threatened to shut down its plants last fall.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 5:19 pm

Foster Farms, a chicken producer in California, just can't seem to stop bleeding bad news.

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Man Tied To Nazis Dies In Michigan At Age 93

John Kalymon talks to The Associated Press in 2009 outside his home in Troy, Mich. Kalymon died June 29.
Paul Sancya AP

John Kalymon of Troy, Mich., died June 29. He was 93. The Associated Press reports that he had pneumonia, prostate cancer and dementia. But during World War II, Kalymon served in a Nazi-allied police force, and for that he'd been ordered deported by a U.S. court.

Kalymon had always denied the claims against him.

"The last two years he had no idea about anything about his life," his son Alex Kalymon told the AP. "He was just struggling to live and his mind wasn't there."

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Around the Nation
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Humpty's 2nd Fall Calls For An Artist, Not An Army

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now to a modern twist on an old tale of an anthropomorphic egg.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We're talking, of course, about Humpty Dumpty. You know, the one who sat on a wall and had a great fall. And then there was the mess with all the king's horses and all the king's men. And Robert, you know the rest. They couldn't put Humpty together again.

SIEGEL: But Mr. Dumpty may have a happier ending at the Enchanted Forest theme park in Salem, Oregon. This real-life nursery rhyme starts out in a similar way.

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Around the Nation
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Against The Dire Headlines, A Few Words In Defense Of Fraternities

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

One male stereotype tackled, the grizzly cowboy, another to go, the Greek man on campus. About 85,000 young men join fraternities every year. That's amid high profile stories about hazing, sexual assault, alcohol related accidents and deaths involving Greek houses. Well, given all that we wanted to ask a few male college students why they joined fraternities and what they've gotten out of the experience. Here's what they had to say.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN 1: It's never a dull moment to be in a fraternity.

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Law
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Brooklyn DA Shifts Weight Away From Low-Level Marijuana Cases

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The district attorney of Brooklyn, New York has announced that his office will not prosecute most low-level marijuana cases. Kenneth Thompson explained his decision by saying, we are pouring money and effort into an endeavor that produces no public safety benefit for the community. And DA Thompson joins me now to talk about the new policy. Welcome to the program.

KENNETH THOMPSON: Thank you for having me.

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Law
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Corruption Convictions Spell 10 Year Sentence For Former NOLA Mayor

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A federal judge has sentenced former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin to 10 years in prison for corruption conviction. The sentence was lighter than what prosecutors were seeking for the former two-term Democrat. NPR's Debbie Elliott covered Nagin's trial earlier this year, and she joins us now to talk about today's sentencing. Debbie, first remind us of what Ray Nagin was convicted of back in February.

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Beauty Shop
10:24 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Getting Married: Should You Wait Until You Can Afford It?

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Can I Just Tell You?
10:24 am
Wed July 9, 2014

After A Bad Bike Crash, Lessons In Limits And Love

Tell Me More producer Amy Ta in racing mode.
John Clark Jr. Courtesy of Amy Ta

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:50 am

My last hill ride was epic — just not in the way I'd hoped it would be. I'll always remember the date: June 7. The route was called "Hell's Delight." Seventy miles of the steepest hills I had ever done. And trust me, I've done a lot.

But "Hell's Delight" was a new kind of suffering. And, although we road racers enjoy suffering, that day I went too far. About 5 miles before the finish, I crashed. My jaw and left cheekbone broke. Half my face was bleeding; so was my brain. There were abrasions on my arms, shoulders, neck, and left leg. I needed surgery to fix my jaw.

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Sports
10:23 am
Wed July 9, 2014

NFL Players Association Still Not Satisfied By Concussion Settlement

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Immigrants Sending Money Back Home Face Fewer Options

A customer stands at the counter at Unitransfer, a money transfer company at the Little Haiti neighborhood in Miami, Fla.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:04 am

The giant remittances economy — which consists of folks, mainly immigrants, sending money across borders — has been expanding for years. In 2014, the World Bank expects that people will send $436 billion in remittances to developing countries (despite more deportations of migrant workers). And by 2016, the World Bank projects that global remittances will rise to $681 billion, with remittances to developing countries landing at $516 billion.

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Law
1:33 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Gay Teacher Files Sex Discrimination Claim Against Georgia School

Flint Dollar practices organ at First Presbyterian Church in Milledgeville, Ga. He's working there part time while he pursues a legal complaint against a private Catholic school that declined to renew his position after administrators learned he plans to marry his male partner.
Adam Ragusea Georgia Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:45 am

For the past four years, Flint Dollar has been teaching music at Mount de Sales Academy, a Catholic school in Macon, Ga. He is, by all accounts, beloved by his students.

But Dollar won't be leading the band or teaching the chorus in the fall. His contract was not renewed after administrators found out he plans to marry a man.

Under federal anti-discrimination laws, employers are not prohibited from hiring or firing people on the basis of sexual orientation. Dollar is working to change that.

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Law
1:32 am
Wed July 9, 2014

States Push For Prison Sentence Overhaul; Prosecutors Push Back

The Lafayette Parish Correctional Center in downtown Lafayette, La. By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country, but sentencing reformers have loosened some of the state's mandatory minimum sentences and made parole slightly easier to get.
Denny Culbert for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

Some red states like Louisiana and Texas have emerged as leaders in a new movement: to divert offenders from prisons and into drug treatment, work release and other incarceration alternatives.

By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country. In recent years, sentencing reformers in the capital, Baton Rouge, have loosened some mandatory minimum sentences and have made parole slightly easier for offenders to get.

But as reformers in Louisiana push for change, they're also running into stiffening resistance — especially from local prosecutors.

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War On Poverty, 50 Years Later
5:04 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

To Break Cycle Of Child Poverty, Teaching Mom And Dad To Get Along

Brittiny Spears, 26, is not with the father of her daughter, Zykeiria, 4. "He just still wanted to go out and party and be a little boy," Spears says.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:52 am

After a half-century of the War on Poverty, an anti-poverty agency in Ohio has concluded that decades of assistance alone just hasn't changed lives. Instead, it says, the ongoing breakdown of the family is to blame.

"You're seeing the same people come year after year, and in some cases generation to generation. And so then you think, why is that happening?" says Jennifer Jennette, program manager of the Community Action Commission of Erie, Huron and Richland Counties in Ohio.

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It's All Politics
5:03 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

A Senator Turns His Bible Into A Political Tool

Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., walks with Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, on Capitol Hill on June 4.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:10 pm

Here are two rules of American politics: Never let an opponent's attacks go unanswered, and if you're running in the South and have a good reason to be pictured holding a Bible, go for it.

The first is a long-standing rule. The second is hard to argue with.

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It's All Politics
4:12 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Unlikely Duo Join Forces On Sentencing Overhaul Bill

An officer is reflected in the glass as inmates sit in the Williston, N.D., county jail in July 2013.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:36 pm

Two senators — a Democrat and a Republican — introduced a bill Tuesday that aims to overhaul the nation's criminal justice system, slash government spending on prisons and make it easier for nonviolent offenders to find employment.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., both freshmen looking to elevate their national profiles, are teaming up to unveil the REDEEM Act, which stands for Record Expungement Designed to Enhance Employment.

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