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The skies cleared just in time for Derby fans to trade out their ponchos for flamboyant hats when the jockeys assumed their posts. But intermittent rains posed a muddy challenge for the 20-horse field at Churchill Downs racetrack on Saturday.

In the end though, Always Dreaming, ridden by jockey John Velazquez, was able to pull ahead of Lookin at Lee in the slop, to win the 143rd Kentucky Derby. The Battle of Midway finished third.

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Adolph Kiefer, the 100-meter backstroke champion at the 1936 Berlin Games, died Friday at the age of 98. He was America's oldest living Olympic champion.

When Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was merely Candidate Eric Greitens, the Republican didn't have a subtle opinion about secret money in his state's politics.

Nearly three-quarters of private sector workers receive paid sick days from their employers, though there is no federal mandate requiring it. In recent years, dozens of states, cities and counties have passed their own ordinances, which typically require employers to provide between three and seven paid sick days a year.

There are way too many signs that the 2020 election is already beginning.

Consider:

-Here's a crazy stat: 129 people have already filed to run for president in 2020, as of Friday afternoon. In fairness, in 2016, more than 1,700 filed. But...

Standing at the kitchen counter in his spotless town house near the Baltimore airport, Reddy Annappareddy heated up some water to make his lawyer a coffee and contemplated his hard fall from grace.

The rest of the country may be talking about health care this week, but you must be a die-hard education fan. NPR Ed has just the weekly news roundup you need. And, actually, we do have a health care note.

Health care bill would cut assistance to special education students

Surely you've heard by now: Sports as we know it has changed forever.

Go on, take a second if you need it. We'll wait here — but while we're at it, we'll leave this little reminder for the laggards who haven't heard what struck the decisive blow.

Yup: a pair of shoes. A $495 pair of shoes. Fronted by a college freshman who helped lead his team to the Sweet 16 in the 2017 NCAA tournament.

On college campuses, outrage over provocative speakers sometimes turns violent.

It's becoming a pattern on campuses around the country. A speaker is invited, often by a conservative student group. Other students oppose the speaker, and maybe they protest. If the speech happens, the speaker is heckled. Sometimes there's violence.

A Chinese man stands on a pedestal surrounded by a harbor as a cartoon imitation of the Statue of Liberty. His clothes are tattered, his hair is in a long, thin tail, his eyes squint. The words "diseases," "filth," "immorality," and "ruin to white labor" float around his head.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

In an all-staff email to employees in the Office of National Drug Control Policy, acting Director Richard Baum shared some news he described as "very discouraging for our Nation's effort to address drug abuse." A draft document from the White House budget office, obtained by NPR, proposes nearly zeroing out funding for the ONDCP and fully eliminating several programs involved in fighting the opioid crisis. Leaked documents indicate about a 94 percent overall cut.

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For the last two weeks, our colleague Melissa Block has been on the road - actually, mostly on the water in southeast Alaska. She brings us this story of passion for one's work as part of her series Our Land.

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Here is one way to describe the economy in this country.

ANDREW CHAMBERLAIN: A red-hot labor market.

A lot of the anger over federal public land in rural Utah today can be traced back to a windy, gray day in Arizona in September 1996. At the Grand Canyon, President Bill Clinton formally designated the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah, more than 100 miles away.

"On this remarkable site, God's handiwork is everywhere in the natural beauty of the Escalante Canyons," he said.

But Clinton didn't set foot in Utah. The planning for the monument was largely done in secret, and state leaders had little warning it was coming.

Why Taste Buds Dull As We Age

May 5, 2017

Sometimes people develop strange eating habits as they age. For example, Amy Hunt, a stay-at-home mom in Austin, Texas, says her grandfather cultivated some unusual taste preferences in his 80s.

"I remember teasing him because he literally put ketchup or Tabasco sauce on everything," says Hunt. "When we would tease him, he would shrug his shoulders and just say he liked it." But Hunt's father, a retired registered nurse, had a theory: Her grandfather liked strong flavors because of his old age and its effects on taste.

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Drug-impaired driving is a growing concern for highway safety officials. But, as a recent report makes clear, its actual impact is still difficult to measure.

The report from the Governors Highway Safety Association, a group of state highway safety offices, found that in 2015, among fatally injured drivers with a known test result, drugs were detected more frequently than alcohol.

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal has signed a bill legalizing the concealed carry of firearms in some areas of public college and university campuses.

Last year, many against the bill celebrated strong language in Governor Deal's veto of a similar bill.

In that veto, Deal's office said it was "highly questionable" that the bill would make students safer.

The health care bill passed by the House on Thursday is a win for the wealthy, in terms of taxes.

Like a lot of creatives distressed by the current political climate, filmmakers Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine want to tell stories that matter right now. They want to make a difference.

The owner of the Pulse Nightclub, the site of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, has announced plans to turn it into a memorial and museum to commemorate the tragic event.

"This must and will be a healing initiative, one that I believe will inspire supporters who share our vision and understand the sacred responsibility to which we have been entrusted," Barbara Poma told reporters on Thursday at the Pulse nightclub site.

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We're going to talk more about this executive order with Charles Haynes. He is director of the Religious Freedom Center at the Newseum. Welcome to the program.

CHARLES HAYNES: Thank you. Thanks for having me.

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