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U.S. News

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David Frum of The Atlantic wrote this week that mass shootings do in fact lead to new gun laws. They've been state laws, and they typically make it easier, not harder, to own or carry or use a gun. David Frum, thanks for joining us today.

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We don't know much about what motivated the Las Vegas shooter, but one thing we do know about Stephen Paddock is that he gambled a lot. NPR's Nathan Rott has been looking into the world of gamblers like Paddock, and here's what he found.

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How Bump Stocks Make Guns Fire Faster

Oct 5, 2017

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Where Recovery Stands In Puerto Rico

Oct 5, 2017

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Fred Rogers, the beloved children's television host, used to tell a story about when he would see scary things in the news as a child. His mother would reassure him by saying: "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping."

Lately, there's been a surfeit of scary news: Charlottesville, Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, and now Las Vegas.

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There's about 10 feet between Judge Craig Hannah's courtroom bench and the place where a defendant stands to be arraigned here in Buffalo City Court.

But for 26-year-old Caitlyn Stein, it has been a long, arduous 10 feet.

"This is your first day back! Good to see you!" Judge Hannah says as he greets her.

"Good to see you," Stein says, smiling.

"We've got to do that after picture. We did the before," Judge Hannah reminds her.

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In the aftermath of the Las Vegas shooting, inevitably everyone turns to the question of why - why would someone do something so horrific? President Trump was asked this very question right before he boarded Marine One. And here's what he said.

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Every day across Puerto Rico, with its shattered power grid, hospitals are waging a life-and-death battle to keep their patients from getting sicker in the tropical heat. Now two weeks after the storm, about three-quarters of Puerto Rico's hospitals remain on emergency power. This creates dangerous conditions for critically ill patients.

Insurers, hospitals and health advocates are waiting for Gov. Jerry Brown to deal the drug lobby a rare defeat, by signing legislation that would force pharmaceutical companies to justify big price hikes on drugs in California.

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President Trump has surprised a lot of people with some comments on Puerto Rico's debt crisis. The U.S. territory owes some $73 billion to bondholders, money that it's been unable to pay. In an interview on Fox News last night, the president seemed to suggest that the bondholders aren't going to get their money back.

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The political debate surrounding national anthem protests at National Football League games intensified this week after players declined to stand during the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" after the mass shootings in Las Vegas.

Before the Monday Night Football game between the NFL franchises in Kansas City and Washington D.C., two Kansas City players sat on the bench during the playing of the anthem, while all of the Washington players stood with their arms locked.

Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith, who stepped down just last week, faced a roomful of angry senators and some tough questions at a hearing Wednesday. It was the second of three congressional hearings he is testifying in front of this week.

Republicans and Democrats alike are upset about the massive hack of Social Security numbers and other sensitive information at the consumer credit reporting company.

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After the Food and Drug Administration inspected a Massachusetts bakery, they made some objections about allergens and cleanliness, proper precautions with bread dough and the listing of one particular ingredient in the granola.

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How A Bump Stock Device Can Alter Guns

Oct 4, 2017

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And President Trump was here today meeting with first responders and survivors of the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith is traveling with the president, and she's with us now. Hey, Tam.

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Kerri De Nies received the news this spring from her son's pediatrician: Her chubby-cheeked toddler has a rare brain disorder.

She'd never heard of the disease — adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD — but soon felt devastated and overwhelmed.

"I probably read everything you could possibly read online — every single website," De Nies says as she cradles her son, Gregory Mac Phee. "It's definitely hard to think about what could potentially happen. You think about the worst-case scenario."

Dr. Christopher Fisher was working at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center just off the Las Vegas strip on Sunday evening when the patients starting arriving.

"It did look a bit like a war zone, can't say that it didn't," he remembers. "Frantic families, blood in the hallways."

People came in so grievously injured and so many at a time that Fisher, who is the medical head of trauma services for the hospital, and his colleagues used markers, writing directly on patients, to do triage.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

President Trump says the people of Las Vegas have shown the world their character, courage and resolve in the wake of Sunday's shooting massacre.

The president and first lady visited Las Vegas on Wednesday to show support for the victims as well as the people who cared for them.

"The only message I can say is that we're with you 100 percent," Trump said at University Medical Center, were dozens of the wounded were being treated. As he spoke, the president was surrounded by doctors and nurses in lab coats and scrubs.

With the country in the throes of an epidemic, communities across the nation are being forced to confront the harrowing, and often fatal, effects of opioid abuse. But solutions — such as creating intervention programs in Ohio, providing access to treatment in Alabama, or investing in prevention initiatives in Missouri — cost money.

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And I'm Steve Inskeep in Las Vegas. When President Trump visits here today, he arrives in a city where investigators are hard at work.

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We are also keeping our focus on some of the at least 58 victims. That's the number that's being used now. Two of those victims came from Anchorage, Alaska. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann grew up in Alaska. And, Brian, who were your fellow Alaskans?

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The tragedy in Las Vegas has quickly led to a familiar routine here in Washington, with politicians on each side calling out their entrenched positions. Here's House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican, followed by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat.

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