U.S. News

The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Princeton To Distribute Meningitis B Vaccine

Princeton University's Nassau Hall. The New Jersey university has seen seven cases of bacterial meningitis since March.
Daniel Hulshizer AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:06 pm

Princeton University has decided to distribute a vaccine for meningitis B that has not been approved for use in the United States.

As we've reported, the New Jersey university has seen seven cases of bacterial meningitis since March.

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Education
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Small, Private Colleges Woo Veterans With Scholarships

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Many veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are taking advantage of the post 9/11 GI bill to pay for higher education. They often end up at large state schools or for-profit, online universities.

Gloria Hillard reports that a scholarship program in California is opening the doors for veterans who may be better suited for smaller and more expensive private liberal arts colleges.

GLORIA HILLARD, BYLINE: Cory Bloor is giving me a tour of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California.

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Around the Nation
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Midwestern States Sort Through Aftermath Of Scores Of Tornadoes

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Scores of tornados touched down across the Midwest on Sunday, leveling homes and killing at least eight.

Technology
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Bitcoin Goes To Washington As Senators Parse Currency's Legality

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

The digital currency Bitcoin is becoming more prevalent, both for benign purchases and as a way for criminals to conduct illicit transactions. Bitcoins have been used on underground websites to facilitate sales of narcotics and child pornography. But even those most concerned about criminal activity agree that the emerging digital currency has arrived and can have beneficial uses.

Around the Nation
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Princeton To Use New Meningitis Vaccine To Stem Campus Outbreak

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Princeton University is trying to stop an outbreak of an unusual form of bacterial meningitis, which has already struck seven students. Princeton's trustees decided Monday to start offering students a vaccine that the federal government has approved specifically to help protect students.

Politics
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Cheney Sisters' Split Over Gay Marriage Plays Out On TV, Online

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The debate over same-sex marriage is at a furious boil right now inside one famous political family. Liz and Mary Cheney, the daughters of former Vice President Dick Cheney, find themselves on opposite sides of the issue. Mary is gay and married. Liz, her older sister, is running for Senate in Wyoming and she has said she opposes same-sex marriage.

She was asked about that yesterday on Fox News Sunday.

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Technology
2:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Easy As Pie: Soon You Could Push A Button And Get A Pizza

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:27 pm

Ordering a pizza may soon get easier in the U.S. — at least if the company iStrategyLabs has anything to do with it. The company's working on a device they call Pie Pal that allows you to order pizza with the push of a button.

Shots - Health News
2:12 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Using Birth Control Pills May Increase Women's Glaucoma Risk

Estrogen affects cells in the eye's retina, which may help explain a possible link between glaucoma and estrogen levels.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 9:37 am

Taking birth control pills may increase a woman's risk of eye disease later in life, a study finds, because they may reduce protective levels of estrogen.

Doctors have long known that cells in the eye have estrogen receptors. But in the past few years they've started looking into whether the changes in a woman's estrogen levels as she goes through life could affect her risk of glaucoma.

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It's All Politics
1:47 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How Would Your City Handle A Mayor Like Rob Ford?

Mayor Rob Ford talks during a City Council debate in Toronto on Nov. 13.
Nathan Denette AP

If an American city had a mayor as embarrassing as Rob Ford of Toronto, whose problems with drugs and alcohol have caused an international sensation, it could get rid of him.

Probably.

Recalls of local elected officials have become more common in the U.S. over the past few years.

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Race
9:55 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Renisha McBride Shooting: 'We May Never Know' Why

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, when actor Hill Harper got a letter from a young man in prison, he wrote him back thinking that would be the end of it, but it wasn't - not by a long shot. Their correspondence lasted years and it's now the basis of Hill Harper's latest book "Letters to an Incarcerated Brother." And he'll tell us about it in just a few minutes.

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Education
9:55 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Homeless Students A Growing Problem For Schools

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we'll tell you about the late night talk show called "Totally Biased." Never heard of it? That might be why it was canceled. But we'll also hear why so many critics are up in arms that it was canceled. That's later this hour.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Death Toll Rising After Storms Explode Over Midwest

A firefighter searches through debris in Washington, Ill., on Sunday. Tornadoes and severe weather roared through the area earlier in the day.
Tasos Katopodis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 10:41 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': WCBU's Denise Molina reports on the storms that hit Illinois
  • From the NPR Newscast: Jean Cochran rounds up the storm news

Update at 12:25 p.m. ET. Two Deaths In Michigan:

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Shots - Health News
1:07 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

Illustration by Benjamin Arthur for NPR

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 10:58 am

Could the microbes that inhabit our guts help explain that old idea of "gut feelings?" There's growing evidence that gut bacteria really might influence our minds.

"I'm always by profession a skeptic," says Dr. Emeran Mayer, a professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles. "But I do believe that our gut microbes affect what goes on in our brains."

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Remembrances
2:55 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

How Writer Doris Lessing Didn't Want To Be Remembered

Author Doris Lessing died Sunday at the age of 94. Lessing won the 2007 Nobel Prize for literature for a life's work which included around 40 books and collections of essays and memoirs.
Shaun Curry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 8:42 am

In the course of a long and eventful life, author Doris Lessing was many things.

She was a mother — and a self-described "house mother" for a procession of starving artists, writers and political refugees. She was a refugee herself, from bourgeois respectability in 1940s Rhodesia. She was a campaigner against racism, a lover, an ardent communist, and a serial rescuer of cats.

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Shots - Health News
1:29 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Why A Patient's Story Matters More Than A Computer Checklist

Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 7:22 am

As I walk to the door of my patient's house on a dirt road outside Tuscaloosa, Ala., I step gingerly. Mrs. Edgars says that she killed a rattlesnake in her flower bed last year.

She is at the door, expecting my visit. Mr. Edgars sits on the couch, unable to recall that I am his doctor, or even that I am a doctor. But he is happy to see me nonetheless.

We chat a moment, then we move on to Mr. Edgars' arthritis. Early on in his dementia he wandered the woods. His wife was afraid he would get lost and die, although the family agreed that this was how he would want it.

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The Salt
9:29 am
Sun November 17, 2013

See How Food Stamp Cuts Are Hitting Across The U.S.

Screen grab of a map that shows hard numbers about who's getting hit by food stamp cuts.
Stateline

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:20 pm

When you think of Oregon and food, you probably think organic chicken, kale chips and other signs of a strong local food movement. What probably doesn't come to mind? Food stamps.

And yet, 21 percent of Oregon's population – that's one out of every five residents – relies on food stamps to get by. And like many people across the country, these Oregon families who have come to rely on federal food assistance program for meals are learning to make do with less as of this month.

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Law
4:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Porn Mogul Larry Flynt Wants Man Who Paralyzed Him Spared

Larry Flynt is speaking out to save the life of the man who shot and paralyzed him in 1978. "I just don't think that government should be in the business of killing people," he says.
Eddie Gallacher Alpha /Landov

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 10:30 am

Larry Flynt is not one to shy away from speaking his mind. As the publisher of the adult magazine Hustler, he's long been a polarizing figure. He's been in and out of court for decades, fighting for the right to publish freely.

During one of those legal battles 35 years ago, Flynt was shot and paralyzed by a gunman on the steps of a Georgia courthouse.

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It's All Politics
3:22 am
Sun November 17, 2013

How Texas Changed, And Changed The Nation, Since JFK

The presidential motorcade travels down Main Street in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, the day President John F. Kennedy was shot.
Cecil Stoughton UPI /Landov

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 10:57 am

Texas wasn't exactly a backwater in 1963 when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, but it wasn't the economic and political powerhouse that it has become today.

Over the past 50 years, three of the nation's presidents have hailed from Texas.

"For the past few decades, Texas politicians have found a natural habitat on the national political stage in the way Dominican shortstops have found a natural habitat in baseball," the humorist Calvin Trillin wrote a couple of years ago.

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Health Care
3:29 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

States Cool On Obamacare 'You Can Keep It' Fix

President Obama tried to stanch mounting criticism of his health care law this week by announcing that state regulators can let insurance companies renew policies for 2014 that don't meet minimum requirements of the Affordable Care Act. But the change isn't sitting well with some state insurance regulators, and several say they won't go along with Obama's idea.

Typhoon Haiyan Devastates The Philippines
3:29 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

LA's Filipinos Grieve For Loved Ones Abroad By Taking Action

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 10:31 am

Since Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines last week, the largest Filipino community in America has come together to grieve and to help.

Friday night, about 25 miles south of Los Angeles, members of Long Beach's Filipino community gathered at Grace United Methodist Church to hold a vigil for typhoon victims. One by one, attendees came to the microphone and named people who died or remain lost in the storm.

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Media
3:29 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Publishing Magazines For An 'Ambidextrous' Generation

The latest publication of the literary journal The American Reader is its anniversary edition.
The American Reader

Magazine publishers continue to uneasily navigate print and digital worlds. Harper's Magazine publisher John MacArthur shared his perspective on the importance of online pay walls in the magazine's October issue. All Things Considered speaks with MacArthur, MediaFinder's Trish Hagood and the co-founder of year-old literary magazine The American Reader about the changing publishing industry. You can hear all of these conversations at the audio link above.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Holy Heartwarmer! No One Can Seem To Get Enough Of Batkid

The little cape crusader's fans were out on Friday in San Francisco.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 2:44 pm

One day after San Francisco was turned into Gotham City so that a little boy who battled leukemia could fight off some archcriminals, fans still can't seem to get enough of Miles Scott, a.k.a. Batkid.

Just explore #batkid on Twitter and you'll see what we mean.

The news networks also can't leave the story alone.

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Shots - Health News
1:25 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

New Medical Device Treats Epilepsy With A Well-Timed Zap

The device sits under a patient's skull and tracks brain activity.
Courtesy of NeuroPace

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 7:35 am

Imagine a tiny computer embedded under your scalp that's constantly tracking your brain activity and zapping you when it senses something awry.

That might sound like science fiction, but a medical device that does that was just approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an option for people with epilepsy that's resistant to treatment with drugs.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Body Of Florida Man Who Fell From Plane May Have Been Found

The sky above the Atlantic Ocean near Miami. What happened up there?
Arthur Mitchell Landov

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 2:30 pm

One important clue to solving the mystery of what happened this week over the Atlantic Ocean near Miami may have been discovered:

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Sat November 16, 2013

U.S. Soldier Accused Of Murder In Deaths Of Deaf Iraqi Boys

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 2:13 pm

A U.S. Army sergeant who in 2007 allegedly shot and killed two unarmed deaf Iraqi boys who had no known ties to the insurgents then battling American forces, has now been charged with two counts of premeditated murder.

The story of what Sgt. 1st Class Michael Barbera allegedly did was spelled out in detail last December by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. An online version of the newspaper's 8-page report is posted here. It began its package of stories this way:

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Princeton Meningitis Cases Spur Emergency Import Of Vaccine

Princeton University's Nassau Hall.
DANIEL HULSHIZER AP

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 1:48 pm

A seventh case since March of bacterial meningitis among students at New Jersey's Princeton University has federal health officials considering the use of "an emergency vaccine," The Star-Ledger writes.

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History
5:45 am
Sat November 16, 2013

How JFK Fathered The Modern Presidential Campaign

John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, campaign in New York in 1960.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 1:33 pm

When John F. Kennedy began his run for the White House more than 50 years ago, there was plenty of excitement and anticipation. He was energetic, handsome and from a famous Boston political family.

But his candidacy was far from a sure bet. At the time, few would have predicted the lasting impact his campaign would have on every election to follow.

Recognizing The Power Of TV

Kennedy made the most of his youth and novelty, says historian Robert Dallek, author of several books about JFK.

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Health
3:28 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Despite Early Stages, Alzheimer's Affects Couple's Big Picture

Pansy Greene, 73, is in the early stages of Alzheimer's. She and her husband, Winston, have been married for 57 years. She says her secret to maintaining a normal life is to stay active and positive.
David P. Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 9:22 am

NPR has been following Pansy and Winston Greene, a California couple struggling with an Alzheimer's diagnosis. Three years ago, Pansy learned she had Alzheimer's disease, and over this past summer, the couple told NPR that their day-to-day lives haven't changed much. That's still true. But on this second visit, they each seem to be looking at the future a bit differently.

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Around the Nation
4:01 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Mich. Man Who Killed 19-Year-Old On Porch Charged

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 8:57 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A 54-year-old man from suburban Detroit faces charges, including second-degree murder, in the shooting death of Renisha McBride. The case has parallels to the Trayvon Martin shooting, with a white man allegedly shooting an unarmed black teenager. But as Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek reports, many questions remain about what happened the night McBride knocked on the defendant's door.

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It's All Politics
3:54 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Obama And Health Insurers Eye Each Other Warily

President Obama makes a statement in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Friday, before the start of a meeting with representatives of health insurance companies. The president said he brought health insurance CEOs to the White House to brainstorm ways to make sure Americans know what their coverage options are under the law.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:14 pm

In "The Defiant Ones," a classic film directed by Stanley Kramer, two escapees from a Southern chain gang hated each other but were handcuffed together, meaning they could survive only by working together.

Which is pretty much a metaphor for where President Obama and insurance company executives have found themselves all along with the Affordable Care Act.

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