U.S. News

Law
10:22 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Verdict In Florida's Loud Music Trial Causes Uproar Over Self Defense Laws

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 6:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Today, we want to spend some time talking about that controversial verdict in the trial of Michael Dunn. He is the Florida man who fired into an SUV back in 2012 with four unarmed teenagers inside. He killed one of the teens, then 17-year-old Jordan Davis. Apparently, Dunn was angry because he felt the boys' music was too loud, and he decided they should turn it down. And then a verbal altercation ensued. That's why you might have seen this referred to as the loud music trial.

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Economy
10:22 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Long-Term Unemployed End Up Earning Less After They Get A Job

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we want to take a look at the economy, and we wanted to focus today on people who have been unemployed for a while. There are currently 3.6 million Americans who've been unemployed for more than six months. That's according to the latest numbers from the Bureau of Labor statistics.

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Around the Nation
1:30 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Mayor Wants To Drive Horse-Drawn Carriages Out Of NYC

Stephen Malone, spokesman for the Horse and Carriage Association, gets his rig ready in New York City. Some say horse-drawn carriages are inhumane; if the mayor has his way, the practice will end.
Amy Pearl WNYC

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 10:33 am

During New York City's mayoral race last year, then-candidate Bill de Blasio promised to fix big-picture problems, like income inequality and universal pre-K.

So he raised some collective eyebrows when he announced what one of his first initiatives as mayor would be:

"We are going to quickly and aggressively move to make horse carriages no longer a part of the landscape in New York City," he said. "They're not humane; they're not appropriate to the year 2014; it's over."

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Education
1:29 am
Tue February 18, 2014

College Applicants Sweat The SATs. Perhaps They Shouldn't

Standardized tests are an important consideration for admissions at many colleges and universities. But one new study shows that high school performance, not standardized test scores, is a better predictor of how students do in college.
Amriphoto iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 3:26 pm

With spring fast approaching, many American high school seniors are now waiting anxiously to hear whether they got into the college or university of their choice. For many students, their scores on the SAT or the ACT will play a big role in where they get in.

That's because those standardized tests remain a central part in determining which students get accepted at many schools. But a first-of-its-kind study obtained by NPR raises questions about whether those tests are becoming obsolete.

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Technology
2:13 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Cold War Technology Sought By Spy Is In Your Pocket — Sort Of

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

And now to All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

CORNISH: Today is a tricky business of keeping some American technologies out of foreign hands. When a man from Hong Kong met with an aerospace company in Seattle last week, he was really dealing with an undercover Homeland Security agent. See Kee Chin allegedly tried to buy $85,000 worth of highly specialized accelerometers. He was arrested and charged with trying to smuggle the parts to China.

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Around the Nation
2:13 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Digging Graves The Old-Fashioned Way: 'This Ain't No Easy Job'

Everard Hall estimates he's dug about 2,500 graves over nearly 50 years. Some have been special: "I buried my mother, my father, my grandfather, and two aunts and two uncles. And I buried my sister Marilyn."
Jennifer Mitchell Maine Public Broadcasting Network

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:54 am

It's windy. It's winter. There's a funeral in three days, and the churchyard in rural Addison, Maine, is frozen solid. Everard Hall is hard at work, digging graves.

"No, this ain't no easy job, tell ya. You've got to have a lot of determination, a lot of willpower. And you can't be lazy," he says.

In his nearly 70 years, no one has ever accused him of that.

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The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Woman Arrested For Not Returning Movie Rented In 2005

Jennifer Lopez back in 2005 when Monster-In-Law was just coming out. An old video of the movie has landed a South Carolina woman in trouble with the law.
Michael Germana Landov

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 2:34 pm

The first thing we thought of when we heard this news was the Seinfeld episode known as "The Library" — the one where Jerry's tracked down by Lt. Bookman after 20 years for not returning a copy of Tropic of Cancer.

But this isn't a plot from a TV sitcom. This apparently really did happen last week in Pickens County, S.C.:

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The Two-Way
11:34 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Penn State Picks New President: Florida State's Eric Barron

Eric Barron, Penn State's next president.
Patrick Mansell PSU.edu

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 11:44 am

Penn State University, which dismissed its president and its legendary football coach in late 2011 for their roles in dealing with allegations that an assistant coach had been molesting young boys, announced Monday that Florida State University President Eric Barron is leaving the Sunshine State to be PSU's next l

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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Pennsylvania Woman Claims To Have Killed At Least 22 People

Miranda Barbour, who has told a newspaper that she's killed at least 22 people.
WNEP.com

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 10:29 am

This is among the day's more disturbing stories:

A 19-year-old woman who's already a suspect in one murder has told a central Pennsylvania newspaper that she's a satanist who has been killing people since she was 13.

Miranda Barbour claims that after her 22nd victim, "I stopped counting."

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The Two-Way
8:08 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Snowden's Leaks About NSA Lead To Awards For 4 Reporters

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 10:23 am

The four reporters who broke the first stories about former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden's revelations are among those being honored with 2013 George Polk Awards in Journalism.

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All Tech Considered
1:39 am
Mon February 17, 2014

A Push To Boost Computer Science Learning, Even At An Early Age

Alex Tu, an advanced placement student, takes a computer science class in Midwest City, Okla. There's been a sharp decline in the number of computer science classes offered in U.S. secondary schools.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:11 am

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Shots - Health News
1:39 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Finessing Health Coverage: When To Buy Insurance For A New Baby

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 7:59 am

We're heading into the home stretch to sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act this year. The open enrollment period ends March 31 for most people.

But there are exceptions. And they are the subject of many of our questions this month.

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Code Switch
5:03 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

The Origin (And Hot Stank) Of The 'Chitlin' Circuit'

The Royal Peacock in Atlanta was one of the more famous venues on the Chitlin' Circuit.
Libray of Congress

For many people, chitlins (or chitterlings) are a tasty (or, for some, nasty) soul food dish made out of pig intestines. If you can get past what they are (or how badly they stank when cleaned and cooked), then you can shake some hot sauce or sprinkle some cha-cha relish on top and dig in. There's even an annual chitlin' festival in South Carolina.

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Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

West Virginians Still Stocking Up On Water, Fearing Pollution

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 5:12 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

There are some basic things we take for granted, at least in the developed world, that the air we breathe or the water that flows into our homes won't make us sick. So imagine you turn on your local TV news to this.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS REPORT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: State of emergency in several counties tonight after a chemical spills into the water supply. Good evening. I'm...

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Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Long-Running Gang-Intervention Program Squeezed By Budget

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 5:12 pm

Father Greg Boyle, the founder of Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, talks with NPR's Arun Rath about his organization's mission and financial struggles. The nonprofit, which is going into its 26th year, is the largest gang-intervention program in the country.

Sports
3:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

New York Skier Can't Seem To Win Anywhere But Olympics

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 5:12 pm

U.S. alpine skier Andrew Weibrecht's finish in the men's super-G earned him a silver medal on Sunday. It was a remarkable follow-up to the bronze medal he won four years ago in Vancouver.

Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Is It Really Safe? Testing West Virginia's Water

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 5:12 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The water has been contaminated for residents in nine counties. At a congressional hearing in West Virginia, their representatives demanded the answer to that simple question we asked earlier: Is the water safe?

Here's Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito questioning the state's commissioner of public health, Letitia Tierney.

REPRESENTATIVE SHELLEY MOORE CAPITO: Dr. Tierney, is the water safe to drink?

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It's All Politics
1:58 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

For Some Olympians, Games Are Golden Ticket To Politics

Team USA enters the stadium during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games in Russia.
Tatyana Zenkovich EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 9:21 am

Ralph Metcalfe and Jim Ryun sprinted. Bill Bradley and Tom McMillen dribbled. Bob Mathias ran, tossed, and jumped. Wendell Anderson defended. Ben Nighthorse Campbell judo chopped.

The seven athletes competed in different Olympic sports and in different eras, but they had one thing in common: they all ran for Congress and won.

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Education
11:37 am
Sun February 16, 2014

States Want Kids To Learn A Lot — Maybe Too Much

A fifth-grade student uses her cursive skills at a school in Baltimore. The Indiana Senate recently passed a bill that would restore instruction of cursive writing as an educational standard.
Lloyd Fox MCT/Landov

Jean Leising admits she's no expert on brain development, but she still hopes to do something about the way kids learn.

Leising serves in the Indiana state Senate. Last month, she convinced her Senate colleagues to pass a bill that would restore instruction of cursive writing to the state's educational standards — the set of skills and knowledge kids are expected to master in each grade level.

Even in the email age, teaching cursive might be a great thing. But when legislatures impose mandates on instruction, professional educators get nervous.

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The Edge
11:15 am
Sun February 16, 2014

U.S. Men's Hockey Beats Slovenia, Securing Spot In Quarterfinals

USA forward Zach Parise reaches for a loose puck in front of Slovenia goaltender Luka Gracnar during the 2014 Winter Olympics men's ice hockey game on Sunday.
Matt Slocum AP

The U.S. men's hockey team nearly shut out Slovenia in the Winter Olympics on Sunday but allowed one goal in the final seconds of the game. The 5-1 win gives the U.S. team an automatic spot in the quarterfinals.

Virtually every hockey game here in Russia is, of course, an away game for the U.S. team. The opposing teams have more fans, more flags, more face paint.

Each time one of Slovenia's players prepared to shoot, its fans chanted. But it was only at the very end of the game that they got to stand and cheer their lone goal.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Kerry Warns Indonesia: Climate Change Threatens 'Entire Way Of Life'

Secretary of State John Kerry gestures while speaking about climate change in Jakarta on Sunday.
POOL Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:11 am

Secretary of State John Kerry is continuing a push to move climate change to the top of the global agenda, telling an audience in the archipelago nation of Indonesia that rising global temperatures and sea levels could threaten their "entire way of life."

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The Edge
7:42 am
Sun February 16, 2014

U.S. Men's Alpine Skiers Grab Bronze And Silver

Bode Miller of the United States makes a jump during men's super-combined downhill training at the Sochi 2014 Winter Games on Tuesday.
Luca Bruno AP

Athletes prepare for years to compete in the Olympics, and then, in a flash, it's all over. For American speed skaters it's been a terrible Olympics, but U.S. men's Alpine skiers are managing to turn around a medals drought.

In the men's super-G competition Bode Miller won the bronze. At 36 years old, he is the oldest person ever to win a medal in Alpine skiing at the Olympics. It makes him one of the most decorated American winter Olympians, winning a total of six medals in three different Olympics.

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Law
6:50 am
Sun February 16, 2014

It's Proven To Save Lives, So Why Is Maine Opposed To Narcan?

Naloxone hydrochloride, also known as Narcan, is an overdose antidote that many states have made available to first-responders.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

Dr. Lynn Ouellette, a psychiatrist from Brunswick, Maine, asks herself "What if?" a lot these days. What if they had found her son just a few minutes earlier? What if they had gotten him to the hospital sooner?

What if they'd had the overdose antidote Narcan in the house?

"What we know is that this saves lives and it gives addicts another chance," she says.

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Education
6:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Schools Fall Behind In Helping Students With Mental Health Issues

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

A recent Newsweek investigation found that at many colleges and universities, being open about a mental health disorder can mean getting kicked out of school. Newsweek reporter Katie J.M. Baker speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the story.

Law
6:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Fla. Man Guilty Of Lesser Charges In 'Loud Music' Murder Case

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 11:18 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

In Jacksonville, a murder case that revolving around issues of race and right to self-defense, ended last night with mixed results. Michael Dunn was accused of shooting and killing teenager Jordan Davis outside a convenience store in a dispute over loud music. The jury couldn't agree on that murder charge but found Dunn guilty on four other counts.

NPR's Greg Allen has more in this story, which we should say includes some strong language.

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Around the Nation
6:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Texas Town Brings Out Its Debs For George Washington's Birthday

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Tomorrow, Presidents Day, is supposed to be a day to honor George Washington and our other founding fathers. But for many of us, it's just a day off from work. Not so in Laredo, Texas, where Presidents Day is one of the most important events of the year. There's an elaborate parade, citizens dressed in colonial garb. But the main event is a debutante ball, honoring the wife of the first president, Martha Washington.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as character) Laura Alicia Gassa (unintelligible).

(APPLAUSE)

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Around the Nation
3:26 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Water-Skiing On Snow: Skijorers Aren't Just Horsing Around

A horseman pulls a skier down the street in Leadville, Colo., in March, during the city's annual skijoring event. It was the event's 62nd year.
Rick Wilking Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

Terri Moitozo, 52, kicks her boots into her downhill skis in Rochester, N.H. Odd thing is, she's 30 miles from any mountain.

"Combining two things I love, skiing and horses," she says. "I'm excited!

Moitozo doesn't need gravity to fly across the snow — that's what her horse, Friday, is for. That, and her buddy Nick Barishian, who's riding Friday.

"He's my horse husband," she says, pointing to Barishian. "My regular husband doesn't do the horse stuff, so you gotta hire out."

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Mistrial On Murder Charge In Florida Gas Station Shooting

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 9:02 pm

A mistrial was declared on Saturday in the first-degree murder charge of Michael Dunn after a Florida jury failed to come to an agreement. The jury did find Dunn guilty on four lesser charges, including three counts of attempted second-degree murder in the 2012 killing of a teenager in a Jacksonville gas station parking lot.

Police say Dunn shot and killed an unarmed man, Jordan Davis, 17, after an argument broke out over loud music coming from Davis' car. Dunn had claimed he acted after being threatened.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Fugitive Finally Captured: 'The Eyes Gave Her Away'

Under the name Marie Walsh, Susan LeFevre was on the lam from a Michigan prison for 32 years before being re-arrested in 2008 — also in San Diego.
AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 7:18 pm

Earlier this winter, Lt. Charles Levens from the Michigan Department of Corrections was stuck at work.

"Well, that day was a bad snow day," he says. "We were not working too much in the field. The roads were horrible, the temperatures were below zero and it was a good day to work on some cold cases."

Cooped up in his office, he pulled out an old file on a woman named Judy Lynn Hayman. She was an escapee who broke out of a Michigan prison in 1977.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

No Rest For The Snow-Weary: Northeast Braces For Round 2

But wait, there's more: New England is still digging out from the massive snowstorm earlier this week.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 2:17 pm

The Northeast is in for another winter punch, with the National Weather Service calling for more than a foot of accumulation in many areas through early Sunday. The double-whammy comes even as many areas are still digging out from the last assault a mere two days ago.

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