U.S. News

The Salt
1:31 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Cheaper Fruits And Vegetables Alone Can't Save Food Deserts

Five days a week, the Peaches & Greens truck sells affordable fruits and vegetables to families on public assistance, people without a car, homebound seniors and even local workers who otherwise would grab fast food or candy for a snack.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:12 pm

Tens of millions of Americans can't follow the government's guidelines for healthful eating because they can't afford or access enough fresh fruits and vegetables. Sometimes it's because they live in what's known as a "food desert," places devoid of markets with a good variety of quality fresh foods.

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Environment
1:15 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Loophole Lets Toxic Oil Water Flow Over Indian Land

Dirty water from the oil wells flows through oil-caked pipes into a settling pit where trucks vacuum off the oil. A net covers the pit to keep out birds and other wildlife. Streams of this wastewater flow through the reservation and join natural creeks and rivers.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 9:55 am

The air reeks so strongly of rotten eggs that tribal leader Wes Martel hesitates to get out of the car at an oil field on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. He already has a headache from the fumes he smelled at another oil field.

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Movies
10:45 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Member Of 'Central Park Five' Talks Justice

The DOC NYC film festival wraps up with The Central Park Five. The film recounts the notorious rape case of the Central Park jogger and the five young men wrongfully convicted and imprisoned for her rape. Host Michel Martin speaks with Raymond Santana, one of the convicted men. Advisory: This conversation may not be comfortable for all listeners.

Health Care
3:29 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Liberal Group Proposes Reduced Medicare Spending

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:46 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

As the White House and Congress debate taxes and entitlement reform, an influential liberal think-tank is offering what appears to be an olive branch. It comes at a time when many Democrats are trying to protect entitlements, such as Medicare. At the same time, Republicans say those entitlements are too expensive in their present form.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:29 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

For Some Sandy Survivors, Medicine's The Big Worry

Pharmacy and medical services stores closed in Coney Island.
Reema Khrais NPR

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:15 pm

In Coney Island, on the southern end of Brooklyn, long lines of EMS trucks and buses of National Guardsmen rolled down the roads this week — trekking from residential building to building.

Since Friday, dozens of troops and officials from the City Health Department have been dropping in at the hardest hit areas of New York, making sure all residents are equipped with the essentials: Do they have food? Water? Do they need medical attention?

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It's All Politics
3:29 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

As FEMA's Sandy Cleanup Continues, Questions Arise About Long Term Help

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo meets Nov. 10 with residents of the Far Rockaways section of Queens, which was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy. Cuomo is seeking $30 billion in federal assistance to help rebuild his state at a time when Congress is already consumed with reducing the deficit.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:15 pm

Political leaders from the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast have not been shy about their intent to seek as much federal funding as possible for their storm-struck states. Damages and lost economic activity as a result of Hurricane Sandy have been estimated as high as $50 billion.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D-N.Y., wants $30 billion in federal assistance to help rebuild his state. This request, and others, come at a time when Congress is already consumed with reducing the deficit.

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Around the Nation
2:58 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Despite Her Lavish Life, Jill Kelley Has Mounting Debt

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:15 pm

Melissa Block talks with Carol Leonig of the Washington Post about Jill Kelley, the Tampa Bay socialite whose report of threatening emails to the FBI led to the resignation of CIA director David Petraeus. Since the scandal broke, much has been made of Kelley's background: how she came to be close personal friends with Petraeus, Gen. John Allen and other top military officials, the lavish parties she and her husband hosted, and their mounting debt and pending foreclosures on properties they own.

World
2:57 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Obama Defends U.N. Envoy Amid Republican Attack

Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is considered a leading candidate to become the next secretary of state. Leading Senate Republicans say they would seek to block her if she's nominated.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 6:16 pm

President Obama sounds like he's in for a fight over the woman who could be the next secretary of state. Republicans have been blasting U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice for the way she characterized the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11.

But the president came to her defense in his news conference Wednesday afternoon.

"When they go after the U.N. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they've got a problem with me," he told reporters.

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Politics
2:57 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

House Members Vie For Fourth-Ranked GOP Post

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to one place where the fight over the future direction over the Republican Party is playing out - the House of Representatives. A race for the number four House Republican leadership post has taken on broader significance, pitting a conservative congressman from Georgia against a congresswoman from Washington state, who has said the GOP has to become, quote, "more modern." And today, that Washington congresswoman won.

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Law
2:53 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Anti-Virus Software Pioneer On The Run In Belize

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:15 pm

Audie Cornish talks with Wired contributing editor Joshua Davis about anti-virus software pioneer John McAfee. McAfee is wanted for questioning in the death of a fellow American ex-pat Gregory Faull in Belize.

Crisis In The Housing Market
2:35 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Foreclosed Homeowners Getting Back In The Market

Millions of U.S. families have a recent foreclosure on their record. Typically, that means waiting at least seven years before securing another home loan. But some families say they are having luck buying again — sometimes in as few as three years.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:15 pm

Buyers are coming back into the housing market after losing their homes during the financial crisis — returning to homeownership more quickly than lenders have typically allowed.

With millions of families with recent foreclosures on their records, some report that they are having luck buying a house — in some cases within three years.

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It's All Politics
2:30 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Maine Independent Angus King To Caucus With Senate Democrats

Sen.-elect Angus King of Maine (far right) joins newly elected Democratic senators and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. From left: Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Tim Kaine of Virginia, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Reid, and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.
Harry Hamburg AP

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 2:54 pm

Sen.-elect Angus King of Maine, who cruised to victory last week running as an independent, said Wednesday that he will caucus with Senate Democrats.

King's announcement means the Democrats will have in essence a 55-45 seat advantage in the Senate next year.

The Senate's other independent, Bernie Sanders of Vermont, also caucuses with the Democrats.

King was elected last week to replace the retiring moderate Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe.

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National Security
1:56 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

The Petraeus Affair: From First Meeting To Full-Blown Scandal

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 3:12 pm

New details are emerging about how David Petraeus' extramarital affair developed, and when officials — from law enforcement to the White House — first found out about it. Track the story with this interactive timeline, compiled through some digging by The Associated Press and NPR.

National Security
12:47 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

What's The Punishment For Adultery These Days?

Dwight Eisenhower allegedly had an affair with his female driver while he was the supreme Allied commander during World War II. He's shown here at the wheel of his jeep in France in 1944.
AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 8:35 am

A half-century ago, President John Kennedy could count on the press to be part of a conspiracy of silence when it came to his marital infidelities.

Today, as the David Petraeus case illustrates, it's a mad dash to see who can publish the latest salacious details when a famous, rich or powerful person is publicly entangled in an affair.

There's no rewinding the clock when it comes to exposing private indiscretions of public figures. But what are the ground rules these days when it comes to punishment and redemption?

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Around the Nation
9:16 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Pressure Building To Turn Lights On In New York

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up in the program, our panel of women journalists weighs in on, what else, the events surrounding former CIA chief David Patraeus' resignation from the agency. It's our Beauty Shop conversation and it's coming up in a few minutes.

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The Salt
8:19 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Raise A Toast To Building Better Beer Bubbles Through Chemistry

You'll be seeing more of this white foamy stuff on top of the beers of the future, thanks to a recent genetic discovery.
Enrico Boscariol iStockphoto

Scientists may have finally solved a problem that has plagued beer drinkers for ages: Insufficient foam resiliency.

As any beer drinker can tell you, a tall glass of lager without a white, foamy head on top just doesn't look right. And even if you start out with one, it can dissipate fast. And that's just sad.

Now, microbiologists have identified the specific gene in yeast responsible for a beer's head and they say this discovery can lead to stronger, longer lasting, more aesthetically pleasing foam on your favorite brews.

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The Two-Way
6:49 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Should Petraeus Scandal Be A Big Topic At Obama's News Conference Today?

President Obama at the White House last week.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Eight days after his re-election, President Obama today holds his first full-scale news conference in the East Room of the White House since March.

It's safe to think that the White House had hoped the focus would be on subjects such as the fiscal cliff, taxes, the economy and the president's thoughts on what he can get accomplished in his second term.

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The Two-Way
5:35 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Panetta: Don't Leap To Conclusions About Gen. Allen

Then-Army Gen. David Petraeus (left) and Marine Corps Gen. John Allen in August, 2011.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 5:24 pm

  • Journalist Tom Ricks talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep on 'Morning Edition'

"No one should leap to any conclusions" about whether the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan did anything inappropriate when he was communicating with a Tampa socialite, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters today.

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It's All Politics
3:32 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Petraeus Scandal Raises Concerns About Email Privacy

David Petraeus, then-CIA director, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee in January. Petraeus resigned Friday after acknowledging an extramarital affair.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 8:44 am

The FBI review of sensitive email messages between former CIA Director David Petraeus and his biographer-mistress Paula Broadwell has been raising big questions about Big Brother.

One of them: When can federal law enforcement review a person's private communications?

To Julian Sanchez, a research fellow at the Cato Institute, the real scandal over the Petraeus affair is not the extramarital sex, but the invasion of privacy.

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Environment
3:30 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Calif. To Begin Rationing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

California begins a new plan to ration greenhouse gas emissions from large companies on Wednesday. Big companies must limit the greenhouse gases they emit and get permits for those emissions. Above, the Department of Water and Power San Fernando Valley Generating Station, in Sun Valley, Calif., in 2008.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 4:18 pm

California begins a controversial experiment to curb climate change on Wednesday: The state will start rationing the amount of greenhouse gases companies can emit.

It's the most ambitious effort to control climate change in the country. Some say the plan will cost dearly; supporters say it's the route to a cleaner economy.

Here's how the climate deal works. Big companies must limit the greenhouse gases they emit — from smokestacks to tailpipes — and they have to get permits for those emissions. The clock starts Jan. 1.

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U.S.
3:16 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

For The Military, A Possible Fall From Grace

Soldiers of the U.S. Army V Corps conduct a color casing ceremony to mark the departure of V Corps headquarters from Europe on May 10, 2012, at the U.S. Army base in Wiesbaden, Germany.
Ralph Orlowski Getty Images

Although the story so far is of a personal failing, it's possible that the widening sex scandal surrounding retired Gen. David Petraeus will begin to affect the military's reputation as a whole.

"David Petraeus suddenly falling that far off that high a pedestal is feeding into the question: Have we been giving these guys too much of a pass?" says Barbara Bodine, who teaches public affairs at Princeton University.

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Health Care
2:30 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Nevada Quietly Starts Implementing Obamacare

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

Since 2011, Nevada has been quietly implementing a state exchange. Although the state joined the lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act, its governor said Nevada made a decision to build the exchange on their own. Pauline Bartolone looks at how a Republican governor is implementing the federal health care law.

National Security
2:30 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Could Widening Petraeus Scandal Affect Policy?

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Michael O'Hanlon, Senior Fellow and Director of Research in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, to see if there are any policy implications behind the scandal involving CIA Director David Petraeus and now Gen. John Allen.

National Security
2:29 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Gen. John Allen Pulled Into Petraeus Scandal

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

The scandal that forced CIA Director David Petraeus to resign last week just got more complicated. The Pentagon revealed on Tuesday that the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen, had email communications with a woman connected to the Petraeus case. The FBI referred the Allen emails to the Defense Department's Inspector General. Melissa Block talks to Tom Bowman.

Around the Nation
2:25 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Unions, Obama Call For Higher Taxes On The Wealthy

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now to Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union, known as the SEIU. She was at the White House meeting today. Welcome to the program.

MARY KAY HENRY: Thanks, Audie. Glad to be here.

CORNISH: Now, we heard from the AFL-CIO chief Richard Trumka today. He said that the meeting was very, very positive, and it sounds like labor leaders and President Obama are essentially on the same page when it comes to extending the middle-class tax cuts.

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Election 2012
2:25 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Some Arizona Counties Still Counting Ballots

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

The wheels of democracy turn slowly in Arizona. The state is still counting ballots from Election Day in a number of counties — and a number of races hang in the balance.

Politics
2:25 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Obama Rallies Fiscal Cliff Support With Labor Leaders

President Obama speaks during Veterans Day ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on Sunday.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 4:43 pm

Compromise is suddenly the watchword in Washington, as negotiations over taxes, spending and entitlements begin in advance of another self-imposed deadline, popularly known as the "fiscal cliff."

Automatic tax increases and deep spending cuts are slated for the first of the year, unless the president and Congress take action.

Leaders on both sides say they are willing to meet in the middle, but that makes their constituents worry about what any compromise will cost them.

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Election 2012
2:25 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

A Look At America's Election Day 2012 Report Card

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

Melissa Block talks with Charles Stewart of the Voting Technology Project at MIT about Election Day 2012, how it compared to past Election Days, and how the process could improve for 2016 and beyond.

The Salt
2:11 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Storm-Battered Food Banks Struggle To Help The Hungry

After Superstorm Sandy, the Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties in Neptune, N.J., is filled with water bottles, canned food and other goods. But these supplies are going out almost as fast as they come in.
Amy Walters NPR

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

Food banks in New York and New Jersey were already hard-pressed to meet the demands of families struggling with a bad economy. Add to that a natural disaster and the upcoming holidays, and they're looking at a whole new set of challenges.

Preparation did help some organizations. Five days before Superstorm Sandy hit the Jersey Shore, the Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties got its new generator up and running. Thank goodness for that, says Executive Director Carlos Rodriguez.

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Around the Nation
1:49 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

At Life's End, A Final Home On The (Shooting) Range

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:20 pm

Many people keep cremated remains in an urn on the mantle or scatter their loved one's ashes over a sacred place.

Now, a company has pioneered a new twist: putting cremated remains into ammunition.

For $850, Holy Smoke will take cremated remains and put them into various types of shotgun shells and bullets for rifle and pistol shooters. The Stockton, Ala., company was started a year ago by two state game wardens.

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