U.S. News

The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Maybe Twinkies Do Last Forever: Union, Hostess Headed To Mediation

The big name in the Hostess lineup.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 6:43 am

"Twinkies Saved! Hostess, Bakers Union Agree to Mediation, Avoiding Shutdown."

That's the "alert" this hour at CNBC.com.

Reuters has issued this "bulletin":

"US BANKRUPTCY JUDGE SAYS PARTIES AGREE TO MEDIATION ON TUESDAY IN HOSTESS CASE."

And according to The Associated Press:

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It's All Politics
1:16 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Rubio Dodges Question On Earth's Age

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., in Iowa on Saturday.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 5:25 pm

According to scientists, the Earth is about 4.5 billion years old. Most of the people who vote in presidential primaries aren't scientists, however.

Indeed, a Gallup poll this year reported that 46 percent of Americans (58 percent of Republicans, 41 percent of Democrats and 39 percent of independents) held a nonscientific belief in creationism, the religious-based view that humans were divinely created within the past 10,000 years.

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Planet Money
12:26 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

The U.S. Is Borrowing Less From China, More From Everybody Else

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

In popular U.S. mythology, China is the creditor-bogeyman. Japan is the place where robots take care of old people.

Mythology notwithstanding, Japan is about to pass China as the biggest foreign lender to the U.S. government.

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Middle East
12:14 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

The New Landscape Of Middle East Conflict

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 7:50 am

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden, in Washington, Neal Conan is away. Conflict between Israel and Gaza continues for a sixth day, as Israel has responded to a barrage of rocket fire from Hamas with air strikes and missiles fired by the Israeli navy. More than 90 Palestinians have been killed and three Israelis. Israel has called up tens of thousands of reservists in case of a possible ground invasion.

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Around the Nation
3:02 pm
Sun November 18, 2012

Sandy's Other Victim: Art Galleries

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 3:53 pm

Art galleries in Chelsea were devastated by the flooding in New York City during Hurricane Sandy. According to just one insurer, the cost to Chelsea exceeds $40 million in lost or damaged work.

The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Sun November 18, 2012

Lawmakers Have More Questions On Benghazi Talking Points

Senate Select Committee on Intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 5:27 am

Lawmakers want to know who made changes to the intelligence assessment of the deadly Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Speaking on NBC's Meet the Press, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said Congress had asked the White House to explain the Obama administration's talking points in the aftermath of the attack.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Sun November 18, 2012

Austin Hosts The World With The Return Of F1 Racing

Ferrari's Fernando Alonso during qualifying at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas.
Paul Gilham Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 6:39 am

Update at 4:05 p.m. ET: Lewis Hamilton of the legendary McLaren team wins the inaugural F1 race at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. Hamilton — the 2008 series champion — also won the race the last time it was run in America, five years ago in Indianapolis. Championship leader Sebastian Vettel placed second today in a closely fought race.

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Economy
4:41 am
Sun November 18, 2012

An Evolutionary Explanation For The Fiscal Cliff

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 5:04 am

Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Shankar Vedantam about the psychology behind the fiscal cliff negotiations. Vedantam says humans evolved as short-term thinkers, which makes dealing with the long-term problem of the national debt particularly difficult.

Politics
4:41 am
Sun November 18, 2012

Evangelical Leader Suggests It's Time To Collaborate

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 5:04 am

The election has also triggered some soul searching among evangelical Christian voters. Now, one of the movement's top leaders says it's time to stop the war rhetoric and start reaching out for compromise. Host Rachel Martin talks with Jim Daly, the president and CEO of Focus on the Family, about the post-election direction of the conservative evangelical movement.

Sports
4:41 am
Sun November 18, 2012

What's The Beef With College Football Rankings

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 6:03 am

College football bowl season is just around the corner, and with it comes the seemingly perennial controversy around the bowl game selection process. Rachel Martin and NPR's Mike Pesca discuss the vagaries of the Bowl Championship Series ranking system, and why you can't just blame it on computers.

Politics
3:10 am
Sun November 18, 2012

'It Takes Generations': Sen. Boxer On The Gender Gap

California Sen. Barbara Boxer says women are still making progress on closing the gender gap in Congress.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 1:29 pm

Sen. Barbara Boxer says we can finally stop using the term "Year of the Woman" once the Senate reaches a 50-50 split of men and women. "That's the goal," she says.

We're not quite there yet. But in 2013, more women will be serving in Congress than ever before. There will be 20 women in the Senate. When Boxer took her seat in 1993, there were six — and that was after tripling from two the term before.

So what does the California Democrat have to say about the fact that there's still a gender gap? Let's put this in perspective.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:09 am
Sun November 18, 2012

Staten Island Relief Efforts Are A Community Affair

Volunteers bring food to residents of homes damaged by Superstorm Sandy earlier this month in the Staten Island borough of New York City.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 4:09 pm

On a street corner in Midland Beach on Staten Island, volunteers have set up a makeshift stand. There's no tent here, no corporate logos — just a couple of folding tables and cardboard boxes full of food, clothing and cleaning supplies.

Ross Decker is the guy in charge.

"Anytime we run out of something, I tell the people just come back in 20 minutes, it'll be here," he says.

Decker says the site, badly flooded during Superstorm Sandy, was picked by a handful of local churches. This volunteer operation seems to be stocked mainly through the kindness of strangers.

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Around the Nation
3:54 pm
Sat November 17, 2012

How Do Public Officials Bounce Back After Scandal?

Should David Petraeus' extramarital affair be considered a disqualifying factor for his public position?
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 5:09 pm

The resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus — and the extramarital affair and FBI investigation that led up to it — has been at the top of the news for the past week.

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Television
2:49 pm
Sat November 17, 2012

Heidi: The Little Girl Who Changed Football Forever

The 1968 film Heidi, starring Jennifer Edwards, was based on a best-selling children's book about an 8-year-old Swiss orphan.
NBC NBC via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 8:39 am

Forty-four years ago, a little girl changed the world of sports in an incident known today as "The Heidi Game."

That day — Nov. 17, 1968 — is when the modern age of football began, Dave Zirin, the sports editor for The Nation magazine, says.

The New York Jets were up against the Oakland Raiders. At the time they were two of the best teams in the American Football League, just before it merged with the National Football League.

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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Former Bears Coach Mike Ditka 'Feels Good' After Minor Stroke

Former Chicago Bears coach Mike Ditka suffered a minor stroke on Friday. He's telling fans he's fine, but he will be taking the weekend off from his job as analyst at ESPN.
Kiichiro Sato AP

Former Bears Coach Mike Ditka was hospitalized after suffering a minor stroke on Friday. The Hall of Famer says doctors have assured him the stroke was slight, and he told The Chicago Tribune, "I feel good right now and it's not a big deal." As the Tribune explains:

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It's All Politics
6:03 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Do We Really Need A Second Inauguration?

President Obama dances with first lady Michelle Obama on the night of his inauguration, Jan. 20, 2009, in Washington.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 1:53 pm

For the sake of argument, let's agree that when we use the word "inauguration" in this particular post, we are talking about the multiday, ball-bestrewn, soiree-soaked, tuxedo-dappled extravaganza that costs tens of millions of dollars and often leaves many Americans out in the cold — figuratively and literally.

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Around the Nation
5:48 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Sandy Made Taking Out Garbage In N.Y. More Heroic

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 10:56 am

While most New Yorkers were trapped at their homes in the aftermath of Sandy, an army of 6,000 had to go right back to work: the employees of the New York City Sanitation Department.

Sports
5:48 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Online Courses Keep Grades Up, Athletes In Play

Host Scott Simon speaks to Brad Wolverton from the The Chronicle of Higher Education about his recent profile of Western Oklahoma State College. The school's online courses are popular with NCAA student athletes at risk of losing their eligibility to participate in sports.

Planet Money
5:48 am
Sat November 17, 2012

A Sequester Is A 'Jelly-Like Mass,' And Other Notes On Fiscal-Cliff Jargon

Charles Dharapak AP

Here's a quick rundown on three of the most impenetrable terms related to the fiscal cliff. For more, see our post, The Fiscal Cliff In Three And A Half Graphics.

1. Sequester

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U.S.
5:48 am
Sat November 17, 2012

FBI And Petraeus Affair: Back The 'Bad Old Days'?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The scandal ensnaring General Patreaus has raised new questions about the CIA and the FBI. For more, we're joined by Tim Weiner. He's the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of two books on security services - one, "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA," the second, "Enemies: The History of the FBI." He joins us from New York. Thanks very much for being with us.

TIM WEINER: My pleasure, Scott.

SIMON: It's been a week of revelations, ruined careers, shaken families. Any crimes revealed?

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Sports
5:48 am
Sat November 17, 2012

A Peek At Basketball, How Head Trauma In The NFL

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: L.A. topsy-turvy with the Clippers now the top NBA team in town, while the Lakers try to pick themselves up with a new coach. And remember those three NFL quarterbacks who were knocked out of their games last week? A couple of them kept playing. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us now.

Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Scott.

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Politics
3:25 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Secretary Of State Speculation Turns Up Heat On Rice

Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, speaks to the media at U.N. headquarters in April.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 11:41 am

President Obama hasn't even named his choice to replace Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who plans to step down at the end of this term. But there's been a lot of heated rhetoric this week over one of the front-runners, Susan Rice.

Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, spoke on behalf of the administration on five Sunday talk shows days after the attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans. At the time, she suggested the attack began as a spontaneous protest over an anti-Muslim video. U.S. officials now say it was a terrorist attack.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:24 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Sandy Reveals Troubled Past For Long Island Utility

A worker repairs electrical lines as Long Islanders continue their cleanup efforts in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in Plainview, N.Y.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 12:59 pm

Nearly three weeks after Hurricane Sandy slammed into New York and New Jersey, the lights and heat have finally come back on across most of the region.

But nowhere was the wait for power longer than on Long Island, where about 1,000 customers are still in the cold and dark, and utility mismanagement has deep roots.

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Technology
4:05 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Post-Petraeus, Net Privacy Backers Hope For A Boost

Online privacy advocates are hopeful the FBI investigation into retired Gen. David Petraeus' personal emails will put a human face on their efforts to update a stalled Internet privacy bill.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 8:20 pm

The tech industry has been lobbying hard for an update to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the 1986 law governing online privacy.

Under an umbrella group calling itself Digital Due Process, companies and civil liberties groups have argued that the law is too loose with the privacy of data stored online, especially Web-based email and other documents on the cloud.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:42 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Seaside After Sandy: Is Rebuilding Worth It?

Ernest Shallo, of Carteret, N.J., throws a ruined air conditioner onto a pile of debris in front of a small home in Seaside Heights, N.J. Residents were allowed back in their homes for a few hours Monday, two weeks after the region was pounded by Superstorm Sandy.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 6:07 pm

Ever since Hurricane Sandy ripped through the New Jersey coast, some of the hardest-hit towns have been closed altogether. Authorities say gas leaks and unstable buildings have made them too risky to visit.

This week, residents were allowed to enter Seaside Heights for a few hours each day to get a firsthand look at the damage. Many are struggling with whether to rebuild their homes.

Weighing The Cost

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The Salt
3:06 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

EPA Says Its Ethanol Rules Aren't Driving Up Food Prices

A sign on the pump advertises the ethanol content of the gasoline as a motorist reaches for the gas pump in his truck at a filling station in Bellmead, Texas.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 1:47 pm

The ethanol industry is happy with the Environmental Protection Agency today. If you're worried about the price of meat, though, you may not be so pleased.

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It's All Politics
3:02 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Florida Judge Denies Call For Recount, But Allen West Continues Quest

Rep. Allen West, R-Fla., has refused to concede defeat in his House race.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 4:56 pm

A Florida judge on Friday denied Republican Rep. Allen West's last-ditch bid for a recount of early-voting ballots in the close and ugly re-election race he is losing to Democrat Patrick Murphy.

West's effort to wrest the race from Murphy, who is leading in a race that has yet to be officially called, now goes to the St. Lucie County elections board, which was scheduled to review his complaint late Friday.

It was unclear when it would rule.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

This Is How Diabetes Swept The Nation

The march of diabetes across the nation.
Stephanie d'Otreppe NPR

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 4:22 am

When it comes to diabetes, just about everyone has heard there's an epidemic upon us.

In 2010, about 18.8 million people of all ages in the U.S. had been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Another 7 million had diabetes but hadn't been diagnosed.

How much have things changed?

Back in 1995, about 4.5 percent of adults in the U.S. had been diagnosed with diabetes. By 2010, the prevalence had zoomed to 8.2 percent.

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The Salt
2:15 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Beer, Wine And Spirits: When Counting Our Liquid Calories, Are We Honest?

Not surprisingly, men like these guys cheering Sam Adams love beer. But more women than you might expect do too, according to a new study.
Sarah Conard AP

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 6:07 pm

When it comes to tallying our liquid calories, we're not always so accurate. Does that tiny 5-ounce serving of wine really count as a glass of wine? (The answer is yes.)

So as the season of celebrations heats up, and holiday cheer is delivered in the form of bubbly, beer or booze, just how many calories are we consuming from alcohol on a random Tuesday night?

Almost as much as we get from soda, apparently — an average of about 100 calories a day. That may not sound like a lot, but it can add up.

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Sports
2:07 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Anxiety Disorder Complicates NBA Player's Career

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 6:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Now, to an unusual drama playing out in the NBA. It involves the Houston Rockets and their first-round draft choice, the 6-foot-8-inch-tall forward named Royce White. White suffers from general anxiety disorder, and the illness is complicating his transition to life in the NBA. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins us now as he does most Fridays. Hi there, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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