U.S. News

Religion
1:59 pm
Sun March 17, 2013

Mormons Change References To Blacks, Polygamy

The Four Standard Works, which contains the Holy Bible, the Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants and the Pearl of Great Price, are the holy scriptures of the Mormon Church.
Craig F. Walker Denver Post via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:28 am

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints released this week the most significant changes to its scripture since 1981.

The Mormon scriptures comprise four books: the Holy Bible, the Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants and Pearl of Great Price.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Two Steubenville Football Players Found Guilty Of Rape

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 10:37 am

Two Ohio high school football players accused of raping a 16-year-old girl on an alcohol-fueled night last August have been found guilty and sentenced to jail.

On Sunday, the fifth day of trial in the Steubenville courtroom, Judge Thomas Lipps called the boys "delinquent" on all three counts against them – the juvenile court equivalent to a guilty verdict.

They were each charged with "digitally penetrating" the girl, which meets the state's definition of rape. One boy faced an additional count of distributing a nude photo of a minor.

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Religion
7:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

U.S. Catholics Gather For Sunday Service With Pope In Mind

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Catholics around the country head to mass Sunday, the first Sunday since the elevation of Argentine Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, now known as Pope Francis. We hear from parishioners in Nashville, Tenn., and Phoenix, Ariz.

National Security
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Female Soldiers Face Tough Switch From Front Lines To Homefront

Sgt. Jaclyn O'Shea (second from left) and Sgt. Alyssa Corcoran (right) stand with Afghan commandos in Logar province, Afghanistan.
Courtesy of Jaclyn O'Shea

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:36 am

In a series of reports this week, NPR's Quil Lawrence looks at some of the most pressing challenges facing America's nearly 2 million female veterans. Like men, they often need assistance in finding jobs, dealing with PTSD and reintegrating into their families. And all too often, women say their military experience included sexual harassment or sexual assault.

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Middle East
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Reframing The Argument: Brokering Middle East Peace

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:16 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Palestinian scholar Rashid Khalidi has closely watched the role of the United States as mediator in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In his new book "Brokers of Deceit," he argues that U.S. involvement has made the goal of a lasting peace less attainable than ever. Rashid Khalidi is with us now from our studios in New York.

Welcome to the program.

RASHID KHALIDI: Thank you, Rachel.

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Politics
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Planning Trips Worthy Of A President

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

President Obama's trip to Israel presents all sorts of diplomatic difficulties, as we've heard. And there are plenty of logistical challenges too. That's a job for the White House advance team, responsible for planning and executing every scheduling and security detail of the president's trips at home and abroad, down to the minute.

Spencer Geissinger served eight years as President George W. Bush's advance man. His travels took him to over 98 foreign countries. He gave us a sense of what the work entails.

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Politics
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Week In Politics: Budgets, Gay Marriage And A Straw Poll

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Mara Liasson about the past week's political news, including the latest in the budget debate and Sen. Rob Portman's reversal on same-sex marriage.

Middle East
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Low Bar Set For Obama's Mideast Trip

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Around the Nation
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Erin Go Bragh, Shalom: St. Patrick's Day The Jewish Way

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:33 pm

St. Patrick's Day in New York now means parades and green beer. But 50 years ago, it also meant green matzo balls at the annual banquet of the Loyal League of Yiddish Sons of Erin. The league was a fraternal organization of Irish-born Jews.

The major migration of Jews to Ireland started in the 1880s and '90s, says Hasia Diner, who teaches history and Judaic studies at New York University. Thousands moved, primarily from Lithuania.

Diner says the first generation of Irish Jews mostly worked as peddlers. But by the 20th century, peddlers became business owners.

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It's All Politics
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Documentaries Help Amplify Conservative Voice

Phelim McAleer directed the film FrackNation, one of more than 20 documentaries screened at this year's CPAC.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 12:11 pm

A decade ago, there were only one or two documentary films screening at CPAC, the annual meeting of conservative activists. This year, there were more than 20.

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It's All Politics
3:41 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Rand Paul Wins Conservative Vote In Straw Poll

Members of the college group Young Americans for Freedom roll up Ronald Reagan posters to hand out at CPAC in National Harbor, Md. on Friday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:39 pm

Conservative activists chose Tea Party favorite Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky as their pick to be the Republican presidential nominee in 2016, at the Conservative Political Action Conference outside Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

As The Associated Press notes, "the win offers little more than bragging rights for Paul, who is popular with the younger generation of libertarian-minded conservatives who packed the conference."

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Around the Nation
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Dyeing Chicago River Green Has History Of Trial And Error

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Chicago's St. Patrick's Day parade takes place today which means the Chicago River will be green, I mean, even greener than usual. The river is colored green, of course, every year on this day. How did that get started? We're joined now by the dean of Chicago's city council, Alderman Edward Burke of the 14th Ward, who's has been on the council for more than 40 years. Alderman, thanks so much for being with us.

ALDERMAN EDWARD BURKE: Thanks for inviting me and Happy St. Patrick's Day.

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Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

CPAC Showcases Mix Of Conservative Visions

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

The annual Conservative Political Action Conference wraps Saturday. NPR's Don Gonyea gives the highlights from the annual gathering of conservatives.

It's All Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Ted Cruz: From Texas Underdog To Republican Up-And-Comer

Texas Republican Ted Cruz, then senator-elect, speaks to reporters before a freshman senators luncheon on Nov. 13.
Harry Hamburg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:48 am

The keynote speaker at Saturday night's closing session of the Conservative Political Action Conference is a 42-year-old Texan who's been a U.S. senator since January.

In that short time, Tea Party Republican Ted Cruz has already made a mark — and in doing so, he's simply ignored a tradition of new senators being seen, not heard. Cruz's sharp elbows have some colleagues wincing and others hoping he'll run for president.

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Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Talk Of Zombies Aside, Gun Bills Face Political Reality

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy holds a hearing on gun control on March 7. The committee has since passed two bills on guns that are headed to the full Senate.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 11:52 am

Two more gun control bills are heading to the Senate floor after narrowly winning approval from the Senate Judiciary Committee this week.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Sat March 16, 2013

What's Changed: From Brady Bill To Current Gun Control Push

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Sarah Brady has worked for tougher gun laws for decades. Her husband, Jim Brady, was shot in the head by John Hinckley when he attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan. Jim Brady was President Reagan's press secretary and has lived with a disability ever since. The Bradys founded the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which worked to pass a law that now bears their name, the Brady Bill.

And Sarah Brady joins us from her home in Virginia. Ms. Brady, thanks very for being with us.

SARAH BRADY: Thank you for having me.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Reading The Tea Leaves Of Obama's Mideast Trip

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 7:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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It's All Politics
4:44 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Romney, Yesterday's Man At CPAC, Gets A Winner's Reception

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney leaves the stage after speaking Friday at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland's National Harbor.
Alex Wong Getty Images

It was one of the most anticipated moments at this year's large gathering of conservative activists.

What would Mitt Romney say in his first major speech since he lost the presidential election and, even more importantly, how would the crowd treat him?

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Politics
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Rob Portman Becomes Only Republican In The Senate To Support Gay Marriage

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Senator Rob Portman, a Republican from Ohio, announced today that he's reversing his opposition to same-sex marriage. Portman's op-ed in the Columbus Dispatch makes him the first GOP senator to publicly support gay marriage. He said he made the switch because of a personal family experience. Portman's college-age son told his family in 2011 that he is gay.

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Law
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Reuters' Web Producer Indicted For Conspiring With Anonymous Hacking Group

A deputy editor for social media at Reuters has been indicted by the Justice Department for helping the hacker group Anonymous gain illegal access to the Tribune Company's servers. During the period in question, Matthew Keys had just been fired from a Tribune-owned TV station.

Business
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Boeing: 787 Dreamliners Could Be Back In Service In Weeks, Not Months

For the first time, Boeing has laid out in detail the changes it plans to make in the Dreamliner 787's lithium ion battery. The company now believes the 787s will be back in service in a "matter of weeks."

Sports
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

College Basketball Teams Hope For More Money By Leaving Big East Conference

For years, the Big East conference has been an elite force in men's college basketball. That ends this weekend. Realignment has dramatically transformed the Big East, as major powerhouse teams are moving on to other conferences.

Law
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Hedge Fund To Pay More Than $600 Million In Insider Trading Settlement

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Securities and Exchange Commission says it's the largest settlement in history for insider trading. Two affiliates of the major hedge fund SAC Capital Advisors will pay a fine of more than $600 million. But they're not admitting to any wrongdoing. Here's NPR's Dan Bobkoff.

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National Security
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

U.S. To Boost Missile Defense Amid Threats From North Korea

The Pentagon announced plans on Friday to beef up missile defense along the West Coast, in part to defend against the threat from North Korea. The Pentagon plans on adding 14 interceptor missiles to a base in Alaska, supplementing the 30 that are already there.

Politics
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Romney's CPAC Address A Reminder Of His Concession Speech

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Mitt Romney returned to the national stage today. At the CPAC convention just outside Washington, D.C. Romney gave his first political speech since losing the presidential election. His audience was a group of conservative activists and as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, they gave Romney an effusive reception.

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Media
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Cultivating Sources Can Be A Minefield For Women Reporters

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The Netflix political drama "House of Cards" is generating lots of binge-watching and happy hour buzz in Washington. And I'll admit as a former congressional reporter, I couldn't resist taking a peek. Some details of life in the nation's capital are spot-on: the army of navy suits, the ever-present IDs hanging around everyone's neck.

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It's All Politics
2:59 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Analyst: Portman's Gay Marriage Shift May Be 'Tip Of The Spear' In GOP

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speaks at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 29, 2012.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:42 pm

It is a theme that has become increasingly familiar during the rapid evolution of American political attitudes toward same-sex marriage: People who learn that a friend or loved one is gay are far more likely to support same-sex marriage, even if they were once adamantly opposed.

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who became the first Republican in the U.S. Senate to openly endorse same-sex marriage, is simply the latest.

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Law
9:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Do You Really Know Who's Behind Bars?

There's been a dramatic shift in the racial makeup of America's prison inmates, especially female inmates. To find out why, host Michel Martin talks with Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer, and author Patrice Gaines, who has worked with women in prison for more than 20 years. They say changes in drug crime enforcement, sentencing laws, and the economic downturn all played a role.

The Two-Way
9:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CDC Confirms 'Extremely Rare' Death From Rabies Transmitted By Transplant

A Maryland man who died two weeks ago contracted rabies "through [an] organ transplantation done more than a year ago," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Friday morning.

The CDC adds that:

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Race
3:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Game Of Change: Pivotal Matchup Helped End Segregated Hoops

Mississippi State's Stan Brinker (53) and Loyola's Jerry Harkness (15) shake hands before the NCAA Mideast regional semifinal college basketball game in East Lansing, Mich., on March 15, 1963. The game was a landmark contest between the schools that helped alter race relations on the basketball court.
Loyola University Chicago AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:14 pm

During the March Madness of 1963, playing was infused with politics. The NCAA matchup between Loyola University of Chicago and Mississippi State helped put an end to segregated basketball. Loyola's win 50 years ago became known as the "game of change."

At the time, college basketball was still predominantly white, with usually no more than two or three black players appearing on the floor at any one time. But in '63, the Loyola Ramblers' starting lineup featured four black players.

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