U.S. News

The Two-Way
10:18 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Justices Let Stand Block On Alabama's Tough Immigration Law

People lined up to enter the U.S. Supreme Court building last week.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 2:57 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review a lower court ruling that effectively bars Alabama from enforcing an anti-immigration law that was considered one of the toughest in the nation.

In an 8-to-1 vote, the justices let stand the lower court decision that prevents the state from enforcing the 2011 law. Justice Antonin Scalia was the sole dissenter, and did so without comment.

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Music Interviews
10:03 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Jazz Diva Jane Monheit Gets To The Heart Of The Matter

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 11:43 am

Growing as a musician is often a balancing act of challenging yourself without alienating your fans. For jazz diva Jane Monheit, maturity has given her singing new depth, and has given her new confidence as a performer. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with the Grammy nominated vocalist about her latest album The Heart of the Matter.

The Two-Way
10:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Ricin Suspect Dutschke Makes A Quick Visit To Federal Court

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 12:05 pm

The man accused of sending letters containing the poison ricin to President Obama and other officials made a brief appearance in an Oxford, Miss., federal court Monday morning. J. Everett Dutschke, 41, was arrested Saturday, several days after another Mississippi man, former suspect Paul Kevin Curtis, was released.

Dutschke is charged with possessing a biological weapon, identified as ricin, and attempting to use it as a weapon. If convicted, he could face a sentence of life in prison.

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Theater
9:50 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Behind The Curtain Of 'Disgraced'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the story of one of the world's biggest and most destructive industries, tourism. Author Elizabeth Becker talks about the explosion in travel since the Cold War.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

I Would Have Stopped Him, 'Misha' Says Of Bombing Suspect

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, as seen in a video taken on April 15 near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 4:32 pm

The man known as Misha who relatives of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects have alleged may have turned the elder Tsarnaev brother toward a radical form of Islam says he did no such thing and would have tried to stop the attack if he had known about it.

"I wasn't his teacher," Mikhail Allakhverdov (Misha) said Sunday of Tamerlan Tsarnaev. "If I had been his teacher, I would have made sure he never did anything like this."

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All Tech Considered
1:25 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Blazing The Trail For Female Programmers

Sarah Allen works with interns Lori Hsu (left) and Fito von Zastrow at the Blazing Cloud offices in San Francisco.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 3:35 pm

This story is part of our series, The Changing Lives of Women.

Sarah Allen has been the only woman on a team of computer programmers a few times in the more than two decades she has worked in the field. Most notably, she led the team — as the lone female programmer — that created Flash video, the dominant technology for streaming video on the Web.

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U.S.
1:23 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Colorado's New Gun Laws Send Businesses Packing

Workers assemble 30-round capacity magazines at the Magpul Industries plant in Erie, Colo. The company, which employs 200 people, says it plans to move its entire operation out of the state.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:11 am

Colorado responded to the mass shootings in Aurora, Colo., and Newtown, Conn., by passing new gun control measures last month. That's not sitting well with several gun-related businesses in the Centennial State, where four companies have announced plans to relocate all or some of their operations.

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U.S.
3:18 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Teen Sexual Assault: Where Does The Conversation Start?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 4:59 pm

The narrative has become all too familiar: accusations of sexual assault, followed by bullying of the victims on social media.

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History
2:21 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

First He Invented The Phone. Then, Bell Left A Voice Message

Though the quality of the sound recordings is poor, we know what Alexander Graham Bell was saying because he left transcripts.
Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 2:28 pm

As the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell is credited with bringing countless voices to our ears. And now, for the first time, here he is imploring us to hear his own voice:

The sound is scratchy. You have to strain to decipher it, but the words are clear. They're from Bell's lips, recorded in 1885 but unveiled just last week by the Smithsonian.

"It lets us know what the past was really like. It fills in a gap for people," says Shari Stout, collections manager at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Obama And O'Brien Take Jabs At Politics And Media (Highlights)

President Obama joked at the White House Correspondents' Dinner that he had experimented with bangs to liven up his second term, stealing a fashion tip from the first lady, Michelle Obama.
CSPAN

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 12:38 pm

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Tamerlan Tsarnaev Spoke Of Jihad With Mother, Reports Say

Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, center, mother of Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar, reportedly spoke of radical ideas with her eldest son in 2011. Anzor Tsarnaeva, the boys' father, is on the left. At right is the boys' aunt, Patimat Suleymanova.
Getty Images Getty Images

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev "vaguely discussed" jihad during a 2011 phone conversation with his mother, according to a U.S. official who described the recording to the Associated Press. The call, taped by a Russian government agency, reportedly did not include any mention of a plot inside the U.S.

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It's All Politics
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

House Leadership Crashes Into Outside Hurdles On Bills

House Speaker John Boehner speaks to the media during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill on April 18.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

The House was set to vote this week on a bill modifying the president's health care law. The Republican bill was supported by the leadership, but ran into trouble and was pulled from the floor before the scheduled vote.

It's an example of the kind of obstacles Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, faces in getting legislation through the House. In many recent cases, his problem hasn't been the Democrats as much as members of his own party, backed by proudly conservative outside groups.

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Around the Nation
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

New Jersey Homeowners Say Flood Maps Will Add Huge Costs

A home damaged by Superstorm Sandy in Union Beach, N.J., sits on a raised platform to protect it from future flooding.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Superstorm Sandy pummeled the East Coast six months ago, and, as with other natural disasters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency was there from day one, finding people temporary shelter and later supporting rebuilding efforts.

FEMA also has a lesser-known role. It oversees the creation of flood maps, which model the risk of flooding in different areas during storms. These maps are also used to set building codes and flood insurance rates. In New York and New Jersey, FEMA is updating those maps, and so far many homeowners don't like what they are seeing.

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Around the Nation
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Vermont To FEMA: Put Our Flooding On Your Maps

A house destroyed by Tropical Storm Irene sits in Rochester, Vt., in 2011.
John Curran AP

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

People in Vermont affected by floods in recent years now wish they could be included on the Federal Emergency Management Agency's flood maps.

The maps for the state are old and don't include flooding from fast-rising rivers and streams, the kind of flooding that tore up Vermont during Tropical Storm Irene.

Karin Hardy's house, built in 1850, once stood in Jamaica, Vt., across from the tranquil Ball Mountain Brook. But when Irene hit in August 2011, she heard boulders tumbling.

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Code Switch
4:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

'I'm The Café And He's The Leche'

Café de Leche owner Anya Schodorf grew up in Managua, Nicaragua, and came to the U.S. when she was 14.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:06 pm

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Politics
3:39 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Conservative Shift Has Some Kansans Yearning For The Past

Karl and Twilla Eisele, of Wellsville, Kan., leave the old Brown School after voting on Nov. 6, 2012, in rural Wellsville, Kan. Recent elections have made the Kansas Legislature the most conservative in the state's history.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 6:17 pm

Kansan journalist Jason Probst says the Kansas he knows has disappeared.

"The great state of Kansas passed away on March 31, 2013 after a long and difficult battle with extremism," he wrote in an editorial for The Hutchinson News.

His faux obituary, lamenting Kansas' embrace of conservatism, went viral. Tens of thousands of people read it. Many were fellow Kansans who wrote to Probst to say they, too, were disturbed by their state's dramatic swing to the right.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

FAA Ends Furlough Program, Returns To Normal Staffing Sunday

Less than a week after mandatory furloughs began that idled as much as 10 percent of U.S. air traffic controllers, the Federal Aviation Administration has ended its furlough program. The move comes after Congress voted to let the FAA move money around in its budget — a quick response that came after several days of travel delays that were either caused by or worsened by the furloughs.

In a statement released Saturday, the FAA said that it is suspending furloughs for all its employees.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Justice Breyer Fractures Shoulder In (Another) Bike Accident

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer fell from his bike while riding along the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Friday. He underwent surgery for a fractured shoulder on Saturday.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 4:23 pm

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer is recovering in a Georgetown hospital Saturday, following surgery for a fractured right shoulder.

The 74-year-old justice fell while riding his bike along Washington's National Mall on Friday afternoon, NPR's Nina Totenberg tells our Newscast unit.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Boylston Street Businesses Get Patrons, Loan Offer In Boston

People walk and eat along Boylston Street, near the site of the Boston Marathon bombings, on Wednesday. Businesses in the area have reported strong customer support; they also have an option for federal loans to help them cope with losses.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 3:55 pm

Faced with sharp financial losses stemming from the Boston Marathon bombing attack and the days of forced closure that followed, businesses in the affected Copley Square area can apply for federal help, the Small Business Administration announced Friday.

The news comes as people continue to flock to Boylston Street, to pay their respects to victims of the April 15 attacks and to support stores and restaurants that were open for the first Saturday since the bombings and the ensuing manhunt.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Sat April 27, 2013

U.S. Citizen Faces Trial In North Korea

North Korea has accused an American tourist of committing crimes against the state and trying to bring down the country's regime, according to the North's official news agency.

The KCNA said Saturday that 44-year-old Kenneth Bae, imprisoned since November, confessed to the crimes and would be facing judgement in a North Korean court. He is identified in the report by his Korean name, Pae Jun Ho.

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The Two-Way
9:17 am
Sat April 27, 2013

New Arrest Reported In Connection To Ricin Letters Case

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 4:13 am

Federal agents who are investigating poison-laced letters that were sent to President Obama and others have arrested Everett Dutschke, of Tupelo, Miss. The Daily Journal of Tupelo reports that the arrest occurred around 1 a.m. Saturday.

In addition to the president, letters containing the poison ricin were sent to Sen. Roger Wicker and a Mississippi state judge.

Update at 11:55 a.m. ET. Charges Filed, Court Date Set

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Around the Nation
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

At Bush Library, A Chance To Become The Decider In Chief

President George W. Bush leads his National Security Council in the Situation Room of the White House on Oct. 12, 2001. At the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, this Situation Room has been rebuilt with the original furnishings.
The White House Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:12 pm

The Situation Room is one of the most mysterious and important rooms in the White House. It's where Lyndon Johnson made decisions about the Vietnam War; where Bill Clinton learned about the bombing of the USS Cole; and where George W. Bush gave the order to begin the Iraq War.

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It's All Politics
3:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Bloomberg Aims His Money At Gun Control Opponents

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at a news conference at City Hall on April 25. The billionaire mayor has been spending from his personal fortune to provide a "political counterweight to the NRA," his policy adviser says.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg seems determined to become the formidable adversary the National Rifle Association has never had.

The billionaire mayor is spending from his personal fortune to help defeat lawmakers who voted against gun control proposals last week and to prop up those who supported the measures.

Bloomberg's first target is a Democratic senator facing a tough fight for re-election in 2014: Mark Pryor of Arkansas.

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The Two-Way
5:01 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Wedged Between Buildings, Plane Part Could Be From Sept. 11

A piece of commercial landing gear was found between two buildings in lower Manhattan.
NYPD

Surveyors have found what appears to be part of a plane that hit the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001, New York police say. The piece of landing gear is about 3 feet wide and 1.5 feet deep, police tell The Associated Press.

In a statement, NYPD Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne said the debris was found wedged between two buildings during an inspection at the site of a long-planned Islamic community center.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Hijacked Driver Helped Police Track Boston Bombing Suspects

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 5:19 am

A lucky escape and quick thinking by the man who says he was carjacked by Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev may have helped police catch the brothers, according to Eric Moskowitz, a Boston Globe reporter who got an exclusive interview with the driver.

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Shots - Health News
3:13 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Oregon's Math Problem: How To Measure Health?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 5:15 pm

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of ways to track the health of a population: the average blood pressure, the rate of mental illness and the average weight.

Epidemiologists have been collecting these data for years, but now, in Oregon, there is cold, hard cash riding on measurements like these.

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Around the Nation
3:07 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

30 Years On, Educators Still Divided On Scathing Schools Report

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 3:32 pm

Thirty years ago this week, President Ronald Reagan's administration released "A Nation at Risk," a report warning of "a rising tide of mediocrity" in American public education.

According to the report, only one-third of 17-year-olds in 1983 could solve a math problem requiring two steps or more, and 4 out of 10 teenagers couldn't draw inferences from written material. In an address to the nation, Reagan warned that "about 13 percent of 17-year-olds are functional illiterates and, among minority youth, the rate is closer to 40 percent."

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Around the Nation
2:47 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

'Poor Chicago' Critique Touches Raw Nerve In The Windy City

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Politics
2:47 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Pressure Builds On White House To Intervene In Syria

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The White House tried to clarify its message on Syria today, saying it is still studying evidence that the government there has used chemical weapons. Here's press secretary Jay Carney.

JAY CARNEY: We are continuing to work to build on the assessments made by the intelligence community. The degrees of confidence here are varying, this is not an airtight case.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
2:47 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Damage To Boston Businesses May Not Be Covered By Insurance

Businesses around Copley Square are hoping the Boston Marathon bombings won't be officially declared an act of terrorism. That's because they stand to lose insurance money. Many have business interruption insurance to pay for lost income — but that doesn't apply to terrorism and few businesses pay extra to cover it.

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