U.S. News

Shots - Health News
1:28 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Each Family May Have Schizophrenia In Its Own Way

Genetic changes in signaling pathways in the brain may cause schizophrenia.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 1:58 pm

Schizophrenia runs in families, but scientists have been stymied in their efforts to nail down genetic changes that could be causing the often devastating mental illness.

By zeroing in on just one pathway in the brain, scientists say they've found genetic variations that are shared in families, and tend to cause specific symptoms.

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Supreme Court Declines Review Of Planned Parenthood Case

The Supreme Court declined to intervene in a case involving Medicaid payments to Planned Parenthood.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

In the first Planned Parenthood defunding case to reach the U.S. Supreme Court, the justices have refused to disturb a lower court decision that barred Indiana from stripping Medicaid payments to the organization.

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Economy
9:43 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Should Detroit Bail Out By Selling Van Gogh?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, we head to Detroit. We've reported a number of times on the city's serious financial difficulties. The city owes billions of dollars to creditors and the governor of Michigan has appointed an emergency manager to try to settle the city's finances.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Summer-Like Conditions Are Fueling California Wildfire

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 10:53 am

As they battle the White Fire north of Santa Barbara that has covered more than 1,000 acres in less than a day, firefighters are contending with strong winds, low humidity, high temperatures and other dangerous conditions "like they'd normally see in August and September," our colleagues at Southern California Public Radio report.

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The Two-Way
6:22 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Rutgers Stands Behind New Athletic Director

Julie Hermann, the incoming athletic director at Rutgers University.
Rich Schultz Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:16 am

Saying that "Julie's entire record of accomplishment ... is stellar," Rutgers University President Robert Barchi has issued a statement supporting the school's incoming athletic director — who has come under intense scrutiny because of allegations about how she treated players she once coached.

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The Two-Way
4:39 am
Tue May 28, 2013

From Texas To Great Lakes, Severe Weather Due Again

Tuesday's weather is expected to be bad from Texas up into the nation's midsection and across to the Great Lakes.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:07 am

The warnings aren't as ominous as they were eight days ago in the hours leading up to the tornado that devastated Moore, Okla., but the National Weather Service is predicting "another round of severe weather for the Central United States on Tuesday."

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Law
1:46 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Alimony Till Death Do Us Part? Nay, Say Some Ex-Spouses

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:30 am

Alimony dates back centuries. The original idea was that once married, a man is responsible for a woman till death. But that notion has shifted in recent decades, as more women have jobs and their own money. Now, a number of states are considering laws to end lifetime alimony.

During his two-decade marriage, Tom Leustek's wife earned a Ph.D. and landed a job that paid as much as his. He's a college professor in New Jersey.

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Shots - Health News
1:45 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Hearing Aids: A Luxury Good For Many Seniors

Basic hearing aids cost an average of $1,500 per ear.
IStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 10:07 am

More than 30 million Americans experience significant hearing loss, but only a third of them get hearing aids.

There are a lot of reasons why someone who needs a hearing aid won't get one: Some think their hearing loss is not that bad, others are too embarrassed to use them, and many people say they are just not worth the price.

Hearing aids cost an average of $1,500 per ear for a basic model, and unlike most technology, their price has not dropped over time.

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Around the Nation
1:44 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Searching For Veterans On Alaska's Remote Edges

Daniel K. Omedelena, 71, served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam from 1968-69. A disproportionate number of veterans live in rural, sometimes remote parts of the country, like Wales, Alaska. As the veteran population ages, their health care needs increase, but many have not even filed claims with the Department of Veterans Affairs.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:18 pm

When he was in Vietnam, Isaac Oxereok's small build made him ideal for tunnel-ratting: running with a pistol and a flashlight into underground passages built by the Viet Cong. In 1967 he finished his tour with the Army and returned home to Wales, Alaska. Oxereok knew he wasn't quite right, but there wasn't anyone around to tell him how to get help.

"Post-traumatic syndrome?" he said. "I went through that I guess, mostly on my own. Some wounds never really show. So inside was kind of messed up."

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The Sequester: Cuts And Consequences
1:43 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Navajo Schools Lose Funding Due To Sequestration Cuts

An elementary school student enjoys Field Day on a playground. Harold Begay, superintendent of the Tuba City Unified School District in Arizona, says the repairs that are needed to playground equipment, school buildings and buses would no€™t be allowed anywhere else.
Laurel Morales KJZZ

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:29 am

When Congress enacted the across-the board budget cuts known as the sequester in March, they cut $60 million for American Indian schools across the country.

Since people living on reservations don't pay state property taxes, the schools heavily depend on federal aid. For the Navajo Nation that means larger class sizes, fewer school buses and putting off building repairs.

A Bumpy Ride

Navajo children travel up to 70 miles to get to school. Many of them ride small school buses over roads that look like off-road trails for weekend warriors.

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The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
2:29 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

After Tornado, Some Moore, Okla., Residents Have Had Enough

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Moore, Oklahoma, residents and volunteers are deep into cleanup and not for the first time. Moore has been hit by several powerful tornadoes in the past 15 years. Many residents insist they're staying in Moore despite the danger of tornadoes.

In fact, as we hear from Rachel Hubbard of member station KOSU, it's hard to find someone who wants to leave. But she did find two friends who say they've had enough.

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Technology
2:29 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

How Silicon Valley Glommed On To Politics

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:46 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. And now, All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

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Theater
2:28 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

New Plays Turn Passive Audience Members Into Participants

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 2:57 pm

Several productions in New York's smaller theaters aren't content with providing passive experiences — the audience is asked to participate. Here Lies Love, a new David Byrne musical about Imelda Marcos at the Public Theater, is set in a disco and the audience moves around, from scene to scene, dancing all the while. Natasha, Pierre and the Comet of 1812, is an electronic pop opera based on a portion of Tolstoy's War and Peace, and is set in a Russian restaurant where audiences are served a meal and vodka as part of the performance.

Remembrances
12:00 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Jake McNiece, WWII Hero And Self-Described 'Troublemaker'

On June 5, 1944, Jake McNiece (right) led a group of paratroopers in World War II. After he shaved his head and painted his face before dropping behind German lines for D-Day, the look caught on with his men.
U.S. Military

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:14 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

The Dirty Dozen was a Hollywood hit, but it was based — loosely — on a true-to-life WWII paratrooper regiment. Jake McNiece led the group, whose exploits inspired the 1967 movie and earned the nickname "The Filthy Thirteen." McNiece died in January at the age of 93.

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Afghanistan
11:55 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Service Members Observe Memorial Day Through Sweat And Tears

U.S. Army Sgt. Michael Johnson trains at Bagram Air Field for the Memorial Day Murphy, a CrossFit workout honoring a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan in 2005.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 2:57 pm

At Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Michael Johnson exercises under a long, steel framework set on a wooden platform. It looks like a giant jungle gym. Above his head are pull-up bars and rings. A climbing rope is off to one side.

It's here where he and dozens of other soldiers and sailors will remember the fallen, just after sunrise, on Memorial Day. They'll all take part in a grueling exercise regimen, part of CrossFit, the popular high-intensity workout program.

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Around the Nation
2:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Overshadowed By Moore, Carney, Okla. Recovers From Twister

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:19 am

Moore, Okla., has gotten the lion's share of resources and attention following last week's tornado. A tornado hit Carney, Okla., last week too. No one died in Carney, but three dozen homes were damaged or destroyed — a big blow to a tiny town.

Around the Nation
2:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Powerful Tornado Struck Moore, Okla., 1 Week Ago

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:03 am

President Obama toured the wreckage Sunday, promising federal help for the people of Moore during what's sure to be a long rebuilding process. The president's message was not overtly political. He did, however, take the opportunity to highlight the important role the government can play — and not just when disaster strikes.

Around the Nation
2:43 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Post Sandy: Jersey Shore Celebrates Memorial Day Holiday

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 2:47 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's go now to the Jersey Shore. As Scott mentioned, businesses are re-opening. Most beaches and boardwalks were ready for the Memorial Day weekend crowds. But months after Sandy, some towns are still rebuilding - in some cases, just starting the demolition phase.

Here's Tracey Samuelson, from member station WHYY.

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Business
2:43 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Garment Industry Follows Threads Of Immigration Overhaul

A man views merchandise at an American Apparel store on the Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, Calif., on April 24, 2012. Each year, the company makes more than 40 million articles of clothing out of its L.A.-area factory.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:31 am

In Los Angeles, the business of fashion is big. The apparel business employs as many as 45,000 workers in L.A. County, many of them immigrants.

Consequently, the garment industry is worried about the outcome of the immigration debate and watching closely to see what happens.

'You Don't Have Another Choice'

One of the heavyweights is American Apparel, which makes more than 40 million articles of clothing each year out of its factory near downtown L.A.

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The Salt
1:32 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Twinkies' Return Is Mostly Sweet News For Kansas Town

Hostess Twinkies are offered for sale in Chicago, part of the last shipment of Hostess products the company made in 2012.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:17 am

The news of Hostess' return to Emporia, Kan., sparked an ecstatic response in this beleaguered town — even though there will be only half as many jobs.

The new company, formed when investors bought Hostess' snack cake business, has hired longtime snack cake production veterans Pat Chambers and her husband, Bob, to help get the bakery here running again. Pat lost her job at the Hostess plant when it closed last November. Now, she sits beaming on her front porch, wearing a dirty Hostess work shirt.

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Shots - Health News
1:31 am
Mon May 27, 2013

For Many, Affordable Care Act Won't Cover Bariatric Surgery

Evidence is growing that bariatic surgery reduces health risks of obesity.
Life in View Science Source

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 2:00 pm

Uninsured Americans who are hoping the new health insurance law will give them access to weight loss treatments are likely to be disappointed.

That's especially the case in the Deep South, where obesity rates are among the highest in the nation, and states will not require health plans sold on the new online insurance marketplaces to cover medical weight loss treatments like prescription drugs and bariatric surgery.

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All Tech Considered
4:25 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Apple-1 Computer Fetches $671,000 At Auction

With the exception of one cassette connector, this is the Apple-1 as it was delivered to Fred Hatfield. The user was responsible for finding a monitor and keyboard for the early computer that recently sold at auction for $671,000.
Courtesy of Fred Hatfield

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:18 pm

Electrical engineer Fred Hatfield bought an Apple-1 computer in 1976, one of Apple's first computers. At an auction in Germany this weekend, it sold for $671,400.

Hatfield's relationship with that computer was an interesting one, and involves one bold interaction with Steve Jobs himself.

Hatfield, now in his 80s and living in New Orleans, says he was always into technology. "I've always been interested in digital machinery. As a kid I used to go to different junk stores and so on, to buy a pinball machine, to rewire it and make it do things like tic-tac-toe."

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Around the Nation
3:25 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

America's Vets: Returning Home To A Broken System

A wheelchair sits outside the Atlanta VA Medical Center in Atlanta. The latest figures show there are about 900,000 claims for benefits pending at the Department of Veterans Affairs.
David Goldman AP

The Department of Veterans Affairs is being criticized for the shortfall in care for almost a million veterans who can't get timely compensation and have been waiting hundreds of days for help, often to no avail.

Frustration with the agency came to a head last Thursday when VA Secretary Eric Shinseki was called before a closed-door meeting of the House Appropriations Committee.

"We are aggressively executing a plan that we have put together to fix this decades-old problem and eliminate the backlog, as we have indicated, in 2015," Shinseki said after the meeting.

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Code Switch
2:08 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

'Part Of The Community': Latinos Rebuild After Okla. Tornado

Mynor Sanchez, a resident of Moore, Okla., lives a few blocks away and three houses down from major destruction. He is volunteering Friday in the neighborhood with his church, Templo El Alabanza, trying to do any tasks with which residents need help.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 6:29 pm

Pastor Chano Najera calls out T-shirt sizes in Spanglish to volunteers waiting for their uniforms.

It's easy to spot Najera in this crowd — just look for the cowboy hat. He preaches in Spanish at Templo De Alabanza in Oklahoma City. On this morning, though, he's wrangling a group of young Latino volunteers as they wheel cases of water bottles onto trucks headed for Moore, Okla., where an EF-5 tornado ripped through neighborhoods last week, but spared Najera's home.

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National Security
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

What's Changed Since U.S. Last Moved Detainees To Yemen

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with Greg Johnsen, author of The Last Refuge: Yemen, al-Qaeda, and America's War in Arabia. They discuss President Obama's plan to restart prisoner transfers of Yemeni detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison.

The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Tornado Upends Okla. Doctor's Practice With Patients In Need

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

Dr. Keith Layne's practice was destroyed in the tornado that hit Moore, Okla. Now the family practice doctor is scrambling to treat patients while worrying about their mental and physical health.

Around the Nation
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

How To Rebuild: Advice From One Disaster-Hit City To Another

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 6:03 am

Host Rachel Martin speaks with John Janssen, who was a City Council member in Greensburg, Kan., when that small town was devastated by a tornado in 2007. He offers his advice for residents of Moore, Okla.

National Security
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Ex-Obama Adviser On Plan To Limit Drones: Why Did We Wait?

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

President Obama gave a major speech Thursday intended to narrow the scope of the U.S. fight against terrorism. He addressed the administration's much-criticized drone program. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Adm. Dennis Blair, who was Obama's top intelligence adviser from 2009 to 2010, and a vocal critic of the administration's drone campaign.

Around the Nation
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Rebuilding Storm-Damaged New Jersey, One Boardwalk At A Time

People walk on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J., on Friday. The Jersey Shore beaches officially opened for the summer, after rebuilding following the destruction left behind by Superstorm Sandy last fall. The storm caused $37 billion of damage in the state.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 12:00 pm

When Hurricane Sandy swept through New Jersey last year, it destroyed many homes and businesses. It also obliterated the boardwalks that are the center of social and economic life in the towns.

In the months since, many of these towns have rushed to rebuild their boardwalks, but not everyone thinks the money has been well spent.

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History
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'Orphaned' By World War II, Children Salute Fallen Fathers

Paratrooper William John McLean II died on his son's second birthday. William McLean III is now 70.
Courtesy of William McLean III

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:48 pm

Memorial Day commemorates those who died serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. For some Americans, the day revives their few and fading memories of their fallen fathers. Those who lost a father in World War II are considered "war orphans." These are the stories of three of those children who have lived nearly all their lives without their dads.

A Voice From Heaven

Geraldine Conway Morenski holds onto a few distant memories of her dad: picking her up out of her crib, laughing, playing with her in the backyard.

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