U.S. News

Shots - Health News
1:29 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

A Bit Of Thought Makes Finding Out Medical Risks Less Scary

Angelina Jolie took a genetic test to find out her risk of breast cancer, and had a preventive double mastectomy.
Alastair Grant PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:39 pm

Would you want to know your risk of getting heart disease? Diabetes? Or an inherited form of breast cancer?

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All Tech Considered
11:12 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Report: MIT Didn't Target Swartz; Missed 'Wider Background'

Internet activist Aaron Swartz at a rally in January 2012.
Daniel J. Sieradski Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:42 pm

In a long-awaited chronicle of its involvement in the prosecution of the late Internet activist Aaron Swartz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology officials released a 180-page report saying administrators never "targeted" the programmer and committed no wrongdoing. But the report raises questions about existing university policies and whether MIT should have stepped in to actively support Swartz, rather than take its "position of neutrality."

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Parenting
10:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Widows: Getting Your Kids On Board With The Dating Game

Dating after losing a spouse can come with a world of complications. And if you're a parent, it can be especially hard to explain new relationships to children. Two moms who lost their husbands share how they ventured back into dating and how their children reacted.

Law
10:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

What's Behind Falling Incarceration Rates?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we'll talk about elections set for Zimbabwe, where 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to win yet another term despite - or maybe because of - what many people call an increasingly abusive dictatorial style of government. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes. But first, we want to talk about an issue that's become a central focus of activists in this country - it's the incarceration rate.

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Shots - Health News
7:01 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Doctors Increasingly Ignore Evidence In Treating Back Pain

Unfortunately, that CT scan probably won't help.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:18 am

The misery of low back pain often drives people to the doctor to seek relief. But doctors are doing a pretty miserable job of treating back pain, a study finds.

Physicians are increasingly prescribing expensive scans, narcotic painkillers and other treatments that don't help in most cases, and can make things a lot worse. Since 1 in 10 of all primary care visits are for low back pain, this is no small matter.

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Suspected Nazi War Criminals Living In Limbo In U.S.

John (Ivan) Kalymon talks about his deportation outside his Troy, Mich., home in this 2009 photo. Kalymon is one of at least 10 suspected Nazi war criminals who remains in the United States despite attempts to deport him.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:38 pm

At least 10 people suspected of committing Nazi war crimes were never deported from the U.S. despite losing the American citizenship they gained when they immigrated, The Associated Press reports. A main cause of the delay is simple: Their European homelands don't want them back.

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U.S.
3:25 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Will Whitey Bulger Testify? It's Still Unclear

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

The defense in the Whitey Bulger trial began Monday. Still unanswered is the big question: Will the reputed mob boss testify?

The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Police Arrest Woman Suspected Of Vandalizing Washington Icon

Green paint was discovered in two chapels inside the National Cathedral in Washington on Monday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:07 pm

Police in Washington, D.C., say a woman has been arrested, suspected of splattering green paint across the organ at the National Cathedral, the Episcopalian church that has long served as the country's spiritual home.

CNN's Dan Merica tweeted this photo of church:

NPR member station WAMU reports the arrest follows a series of similar acts of vandalism across Washington.

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Code Switch
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:26 pm

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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Shots - Health News
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:24 pm

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

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It's All Politics
3:45 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Obama And Clinton Meet For 'Friendship' Lunch

President Obama has lunch with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on the patio outside the Oval Office on Monday.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Talk about a power lunch.

President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met Monday for a private lunch that immediately sparked speculation about what it means for the 2016 presidential race.

The visit marked at least the second time the two have met privately since Clinton left the State Department earlier this year. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, met with Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for a private White House dinner in March.

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U.S.
3:27 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Statue Brings Friction Over WWII Comfort Women To California

South Korean police stand guard beside a comfort woman statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in May. The Southern California city of Glendale will dedicate an identical statue on Tuesday.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

For decades, Koreans have been pushing to preserve the legacy of women forced to provide sex to Japanese army soldiers during World War II. Glendale, Calif., will dedicate a statue memorializing the victims, known as "comfort women," on Tuesday. But the statue has spurred controversy in this Southern California city, where some area residents say it is a divisive reminder of the horrors of war.

The sculpture is a bronze statue of a young girl. She looks about 14 — around the same age as many comfort women when they were forced into military brothels run by Japan's imperial army.

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Around the Nation
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Diverse Coalition Fights FCC Plan To Sell Wireless Airwaves

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Finally, this hour, a cause that brought Broadway to Capitol Hill today, unusual coalition of Broadway theaters, along with representatives from pro sports and churches went to the Hill to advocate for wireless microphones. The group is concerned about a plan by the Federal Communications Commission to auction off portions of bandwidth. Supporters of the auction say it will create improved service for smartphones and other wireless devices and raise billions of dollars for the federal government.

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Energy
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Pa. Landowners Feel Cheated By Royalty Payments From Fracking

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now to another part of the country that's seeing a lot of new drilling, thanks to fracking, that's Pennsylvania. Some landowners there are upset about royalties. They claim they're being cheated out of payments by one of the country's biggest natural gas companies.

Marie Cusick of member station WITF in Harrisburg tells us more.

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Around the Nation
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Baltimore Activists Use Art And The Web To Fight Blight

Street artists Nether (top) and Tefcon install a mural in the Johnston Square neighborhood of East Baltimore.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

The Johnston Square neighborhood of East Baltimore used to be a thriving, working-class community. But that was a long time ago.

"I don't see kids playing games like we used to play, like the girls playing jacks and skipping jump-rope," says Richard Dean, who has lived here his whole life. "To me that is sad."

Most of the once-tidy row houses on the block sit empty; boarded up, cornices cracking, brick walls warped from water damage. Dean says the sense of community he grew up with disappeared as the neighborhood's population dwindled.

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Law
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Obama Administration Looks To Mend Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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All Tech Considered
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

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Law
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Legal Battles Over Land Rights, Pipelines Are On The Rise

The Crosstex NGL Pipeline is just one such project in the country that has forced long, unwanted legal battles between oil companies and landowners.
Mose Buchele KUT

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

At Margaret O'Keefe's farm in East Texas, they grow high-quality Bermuda grass. The fields are flat and vibrant green, surrounded by woods of a darker, richer green. The family loves this land. O'Keefe inherited it from her mother, who divided it among eight children.

"She used to call it 'enchanted valley,' " O'Keefe says.

But her "enchanted valley" also lies in the path of the Crosstex NGL Pipeline.

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Environment
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Once Resilient, Trees In The West Now More Vulnerable To Fires

The remains of a tree are seen in front of a boulder in the Dome Wilderness area of New Mexico in August 2012. The Las Conchas Fire torched the land in 2011, burning through more than 150,000 acres of forest.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:24 pm

On any given day, there's a wildfire burning somewhere in the U.S. — and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Many western forests have evolved with fire, and actually benefit from the occasional wildfire.

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Middle East
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Kerry Relaunches Mideast Peace Talks Amid Skepticism

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This evening, after a three-year hiatus, Secretary of State John Kerry is re-launching Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Kerry has tapped a longtime expert on the region, Martin Indyk of The Brookings Institution, to be the day-to-day point person on negotiations. Many are skeptical that this renewed effort will work. But as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, Secretary Kerry has made it a top priority.

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Shots - Health News
2:19 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Canvassers For Health Coverage Find Few Takers In Boca Raton

Volunteer Tammy Spencer goes door to door in Boca Raton., Fla., on July 27 to spread the word on the state's health exchange.
Phil Galewitz Kaiser Health News

Tammy Spencer did a double take when she read the address on her paper and looked at the house in front of her.

Spencer, a volunteer with the nonprofit Enroll America, was spending a hot and humid Saturday morning knocking on doors in Boca Raton, a mostly posh South Florida city, looking for people without health coverage. She wanted to let them know about new online insurance marketplaces that open for enrollment Oct. 1.

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Shots - Health News
12:48 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Boys With Autism Or ADHD More Prone To Overuse Video Games

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children have no more than two hours a day of "screen time."
Marilyn Nieves iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 3:50 pm

Video games can be a haven from the world, and it's easy to imagine that they would appeal to children who struggle with social interaction.

Boys with autism spectrum disorders or with ADHD are both prone to problematic use of video games, according to a study.

The researchers asked the parents of boys ages 8 to 18 to report on their child's video game use, including hours of use and the types of games they play.

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Law
10:40 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Fight Over Voting Rights Reignites

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Just ahead, the weekly protests in North Carolina known as Moral Mondays may be coming to an end. We'll speak with the main organizer, Reverend William Barber, about where the movement goes from here.

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Law
10:40 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Alberto Gonzales: Voting Rights Laws 'Have to Be Reasonable'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
5:17 am
Mon July 29, 2013

A New App Will Let You Share Your Leftovers With Strangers

Leftover Swap will let you share your unfinished meals with strangers.
Laura Mundee Flickr

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:42 am

Startups have made it so much easier for peer-to-peer buying and bartering these days. Need a place to stay? Swap houses. Want to fill out your wardrobe? Swap clothing. And coming soon is Leftover Swap, a smartphone app to help you barter or give away your leftovers.

This is either ingenious or cringe-worthy, depending on your penchant for other people's unfinished meals.

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U.S.
3:08 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Man Approaches 3 Million Miles On Volvo

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:07 am

Irv Gordon was a young high school teacher when he bought his Volvo P1800 coupe in 1966. The Long Island resident has since driven almost 3 million miles in that car.

Around the Nation
1:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Miami Beach Preservationists Battle Glitterati Over Homes

This house owned by a plastic surgeon and his wife, a cast member on The Real Housewives of Miami, is the poster child for efforts to stop runaway demolitions in Miami Beach.
Courtesy of Arthur Marcus

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:35 am

Some of Miami Beach's quietest and most historic neighborhoods can be found in a chain of small islands connected by a causeway. On Di Lido Island, a community of homes built 50 and 60 years ago is being torn down and replaced, lot by lot. On one street alone, five houses currently are slated for demolition.

Daniel Ciraldo stands across the street from two '60s-era houses that will soon be demolished and replaced by a new home nearly double their combined size.

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Health Care
4:24 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

High-Deductible Health Plans, Gamble For Some, On The Rise

Near the end of last year, a big finance company in Charlotte, N.C., was doing what a lot of other businesses have been doing recently: switching up their health care offerings.

"Everything was changing, and we would only be offered two choices and each were a high-deductible plan," says Marty Metzl, whose husband works for the company.

High-deductible plans are the increasingly common kind of health insurance that have cheaper premiums than traditional plans, but they put you on the hook for thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs before the insurance kicks in.

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Science
2:34 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

The Rise Of Bloodsucking Insects You Can't Just Swat Away

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 4:24 pm

Steamy days, sultry nights and swarming bugs all make up the thrum of life in the heart of summer. But more and more, our summers are assaulted by the bloodsucking kind of bugs, namely mosquitoes and ticks.

More than a nuisance, new species can impact our health and indicate larger environmental trends.

Beautiful And Adaptable

One relative newcomer prowling the scene is the Asian tiger mosquito. Named for its unique markings, it is black with white stripes.

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Environment
2:29 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Conservationists Call For Quiet: The Ocean Is Too Loud!

The beaked whale is one of the most vulnerable of all whale species to underwater noise pollution.
Robin Baird/Cascadia Research

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 4:24 pm

Just about everything that we do in the water makes noise. When we ship goods from country to country, when we explore for oil and gas and minerals, when the military trains with explosives or intense sonar systems — the noise travels.

But these man-made noises are making it impossible for sea creatures to communicate with themselves, something that is integral to their survival. Michael Jasny, the director of the Marine Mammal Protection Project for the Natural Resources Defense Council, says we have to quiet down.

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