U.S. News

Politics
3:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Meet The New Stars Of Campaign Ads: Mom And Dad

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., talks with her father, former New Orleans Mayor Moon Landrieu, on Feb. 1. The two appear together in recent television ads for her re-election campaign.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

It's the summer of a campaign year and once again the airwaves, the Internet, and likely your own Facebook and other social media feeds are full of political ads.

In the primaries, we've already seen ads featuring cartoon turtles, gator wrestling, lots of dogs, horses and, of course, guns — propped against pickup trucks or resting over shoulders.

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Education
3:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

To 'Immunize' Kids Against Illiteracy, Break Out A Book In Infancy

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 3:24 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. Read to your children. This isn't the first time you've heard that advice. But now parents with infants will start hearing it officially from pediatricians starting from birth. The American Academy of Pediatrics announced new guidance today for parents to quote, "immunize their children against illiteracy."

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Report Points To 'Dangerous Militarization' Of U.S. Law Enforcement

During a drill, SWAT team members prepare to secure a ship in Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:09 pm

U.S. law enforcement at all levels has undergone a dangerous militarization in recent years, with heavily armed SWAT teams being deployed to serve warrants and for drug searches, but rarely for the hostage situations they were designed for, the American Civil Liberties Union says in a new report.

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Energy
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

In Wyoming, Going Deep To Draw Energy From Coal

Linc Energy has installed 44 monitoring wells at its proposed test site near Wright, Wyo., to establish baseline water quality.
Stephanie Joyce for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 7:42 am

The United States is the Saudi Arabia of coal. The only catch is that most coal is buried too deep for conventional mining.

In the tradition of fracking pioneers in the oil and gas industries, an Australian company working in Wyoming wants to use an unconventional technique to access that deep coal: burning it underground.

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Shots - Health News
2:35 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

3-D Mammography Finds More Tumors, But Questions Remain

A standard digital mammogram, left, compared to a 3-D tomosynthesis mammogram, right.
Courtesy of Hologic

A form of mammogram that takes multiple images does a slightly better job of finding tumors and reducing women's risk of having to be scanned again, a study finds.

It's the biggest study yet to look at tomosynthesis, also called 3-D mammograms. But it's still unclear if using this kind of mammogram increases a woman's odds of surviving breast cancer, the researchers say.

Rather, it found that the 3-D mammograms reduced the rate of recalls, where women had to have more scanning or a biopsy, by 1.6 percent.

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Code Switch
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

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Education
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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Shots - Health News
11:29 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Never Too Young: Pediatricians Say Parents Should Read To Infants

Cuddling up to read a story with the very young helps them recognize words and learn vocabulary, researchers say.
Jo Unruh iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:29 pm

Children whose parents read to them get a head start on language skills and literacy, as well as lovely cuddle time with Mom or Dad. But many children miss out on that experience, with one-third of children starting kindergarten without the language skills they need to learn to read.

So the nation's pediatricians are upping the ante, asking parents to start reading to their children when they're babies.

And pediatricians are becoming book purveyors, handing out books to families who might not have the resources to buy them.

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Parenting
10:39 am
Tue June 24, 2014

What To Do If Your Child Is Not A Happy Camper

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Money Coach
10:39 am
Tue June 24, 2014

First-Time Renters: 'Know What's Important To You' When Apartment Hunting

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Ed
10:05 am
Tue June 24, 2014

New Approaches To Discipline Strive To Keep Kids Out Of Jail

A jury of 9th-graders is sworn in at a "teen court" session in Michigan.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

School's out for the summer. For young people in New York City, if last summer was any guide, that may mean they're less likely to be arrested.

The connection between young people, especially poor boys of color, getting into trouble in school and getting into trouble with the law is known as the "school-to-prison pipeline."

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Shots - Health News
1:31 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Measles Outbreak In Ohio Leads Amish To Reconsider Vaccines

Amish show up at a makeshift clinic to get vaccinated against the measles. There's been an outbreak of measles among the Amish in central Ohio.
Sarah Jane Tribble Sarah Jane Tribble

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:53 am

The Amish countryside in central Ohio looks as it has for a hundred years. There are picturesque pastures with cows and sheep, and big red barns dot the landscape.

But something changed here, when, on an April afternoon, an Amish woman walked to a communal call box. She picked up the phone to call the Knox County Health Department. She told a county worker she and a family next door had the measles.

That call spurred nurse Jacqueline Fletcher into action.

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Environment
1:27 am
Tue June 24, 2014

As Sea Levels Rise, Norfolk Is Sinking And Planning

The naval base at Norfolk has had to build two levels to its docks to accommodate rising sea levels. The water level has risen about 1 1/2 feet since 1920.
Yuki Noguchi NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 9:25 am

From the water's edge in Norfolk, Va., the U.S. naval base spans the whole horizon. Aircraft carriers, supply centers, barracks and admirals' homes fill a vast expanse.

But Ray Toll, a retired naval oceanographer, says the "majority of [the naval base], if not all of it" is at risk of flooding "because it's so low and it's flat."

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NPR Story
1:26 am
Tue June 24, 2014

With Cash And Fat Fryers, Americans Feed Cuba's Growing Free Market

A man stands in line at Miami International airport to board a charter flight to Havana, Cuba. Travelers often fly to Cuba from the U.S. with piles of goods, despite a decades-long trade embargo.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 10:38 am

Every day, you can see signs of a subtle change in relations between Cuba and the U.S. at Miami International Airport.

More Cubans than ever before are coming to the U.S. to visit, and the number of Cuban-Americans traveling back to the island is also at record levels. With all the visitors, money and goods are now traveling to the island from the United States.

It's a legal loophole in the 50-year-old trade embargo — one that's having a real impact on Cuba's economy, and allowing Cuban-Americans to become investors in Cuba's emerging private sector.

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Code Switch
5:38 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Congressman Rangel Battles For Political Survival

Rep. Charles Rangel, a Democrat from New York, speaks during a June interview in New York.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:13 pm

Charles Rangel, who for 44 years has represented an Upper Manhattan district that includes Harlem, faces off against three opponents in the New York Democratic primary Tuesday. The most serious challenge comes from state Sen. Adriano Espaillat.

Rangel was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1970, defeating the legendary Adam Clayton Powell Jr. — the first African-American elected to Congress from New York. He has held the seat ever since, rising to power in Washington and at one time serving as head of the powerful Ways and Means Committee.

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Men In America
4:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The New American Man Doesn't Look Like His Father

While life has changed significantly for American men in the past half-century, notions of masculinity remain tied to those that may have been passed down from this father to the son on his shoulders.
Evans/Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 9:36 am

This summer, All Things Considered is exploring what it means to be a man in America today. In some ways, the picture for men has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. More women than men are going to college, and the economy is moving away from jobs that traditionally favored men, like manufacturing and mining. Attitudes have also changed on the social front, with young men having more egalitarian attitudes toward women and expectations of being involved fathers.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Pharmaceutical Companies Accuse Hospitals Of Misusing Discounts

David Chance recuperates at Oregon Health and Science University.
Kristian Foden-Vencil Oregon Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

In 1992, the federal government told drugmakers they had to give steep discounts to hospitals that treat a large percentage of poor patients.

The law got bipartisan support and it was a boon for hospitals and the federal government. In the decades that followed, the discount program has grown by leaps and bounds.

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Politics
2:24 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

In Oklahoma Senate Race, A Choice Between Two Deep Shades Of Red

State Rep. T.W. Shannon (left) talks with U.S. Rep. James Lankford following a June 6 Republican candidate forum for the open U.S. Senate seat in Lawton, Okla.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

In Oklahoma, Republicans will vote Tuesday on a nominee to finish the term of current GOP Sen. Tom Coburn, who is retiring at year-end with two years left to spare. For the two front-runners, Rep. James Lankford and former state House Speaker T.W. Shannon, immigration has suddenly become an issue in the race.

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Shots - Health News
2:17 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Parents Get Some Help In Teaching Their Teens To Drive

No, your other right! Most parents would probably welcome some help when it comes to teaching teenage drivers.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:28 pm

Parents often take the lead in teaching their teenage children to drive, even though their own memories of starting out behind the wheel may be hazy at best.

And since car crashes are the top cause of teen deaths in the United States. claiming more than 2,700 teen lives in 2010 and sending another 282,000 to the emergency room, it's a task that parents really need to get right.

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Religion
2:12 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

In Trial, Movement To Ordain Mormon Women Approaches Defining Moment

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:51 pm

Since the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1830, only men have been allowed to be ordained as priests. As Dan Bammes of KUER reports, a chorus of women has been asking church leaders to reconsider that policy. One Mormon feminist, in particular, has just been expelled from the church for her activism.

Iraq
2:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Kerry Lands In Badhdad, Bearing Warnings For Iraqi Leaders

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
2:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

In 'Drone Memo,' A Step Toward Transparency On Targeting Americans

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

On Monday, a federal court made public a long-secret memo that lays out the Obama administration's legal justification for killing an American citizen in a drone strike. The memo, which concerns the 2011 killing of Anwar Al-Awlaki, says that the man presented an imminent threat to the United States.

Shots - Health News
2:04 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

After The Fall, A Young Man Chronicles His Life With Multiple Sclerosis

Jason DaSilva was on a family vacation in 2006 when he fell and couldn't get up. His multiple sclerosis symptoms have progressed to the point that he can't walk.
Factory Release

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:29 pm

At age 25, Jason DaSilva had everything — he was smart, talented, good-looking and traveling the world as a documentary filmmaker. Then he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

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History
1:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

50 Years Ago, Students Fought For Black Rights During 'Freedom Summer'

Fannie Lou Hamer was an activist who spoke out for black rights during Freedom Summer.
Courtesy of Ken Thompson/General Board of Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:50 pm

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a movement to open the polls to blacks in Mississippi and end white supremacy in the state.

Freedom Summer was organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, which recruited 700 college students — mostly white students from the North — to travel to Mississippi and help African-Americans register to vote. The organizers, the students and the black people trying to register were all risking their lives, a measure of how pervasive racism was at the time.

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NPR Ed
12:11 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Be A Varsity Player ... In Video Games?

League of Legends is a video game with 70 million players a month.
Riot Games, Inc

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 1:22 pm

Imagine the lede in the campus newspaper:

The Eagles swept to a win last night in 100 hours of tournament gameplay. Tabbz made the absolute best usage of the shields and heals that were available to him. Froggen went for utility and pushing power, while Nyph's black shields were near perfect, and he hit a bunch of bindings. Airwak's Lee Sin kick ended the encounter with a massive multicolor explosion.

Monday morning quarterbacking will never be the same.

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Law
11:03 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Central Park Five Settlement: Was Justice Served?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:22 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Portugal Snatches Victory From U.S., Match Ends 2-2

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know, I was driving with the windows down on Sunday afternoon and suddenly heard roaring crowds cheering and chanting U.S.A.. It was a lovely summer day here in Washington, D.C., and the car rolled between two outdoor restaurants where people watching the World Cup on TV saw the U.S. score a goal to go ahead. In the end, the U.S. only tied Portugal 2 to 2. They were playing in the city of Manaus, in the thick heat and humidity of the Brazilian Amazon. NPR's Tom Goldman was there.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING)

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NPR Ed
2:32 am
Mon June 23, 2014

To Boost Attendance, Milwaukee Schools Revive Art, Music And Gym

Students in gym class at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee. Two years ago, the students had no gym, art, or music classes but that's changing as Milwaukee Public Schools re-hires teachers for these classes.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 1:00 pm

In the stuffy, little gymnasium at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee, 16 boys and girls are stretching, jumping and marching to music.

Two years ago, the school had no gym, art or music classes due to budget cuts. But now, Kluge students get a so-called "special" class three days a week.

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Shots - Health News
1:29 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Hospitals To Pay Big Fines For Infections, Avoidable Injuries

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:32 am

Medicare is preparing to penalize about 750 hospitals that have the highest rates of infections and patient injuries. The sanctions, estimated to total $330 million over a year, will kick in at a time when most infections and accidents in hospitals are on the decline, but still too common.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 am
Mon June 23, 2014

How A Woman's Plan To Kill Herself Helped Her Family Grieve

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 3:06 pm

This story is in no way an endorsement of suicide. It's a description of one woman's choice and what came of it.

Five years ago, after doctors told her that she had Alzheimer's disease that would eventually steal her ability to read, write and recognize people, Sandy Bem decided to kill herself.

Sandy was 65 years old, an unsentimental woman and strong willed. For her, a life without books and the ability to recognize the people she loved wasn't a life she wanted.

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