U.S. News

The Two-Way
6:36 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Health Care Worker Tests Negative For Ebola In NJ, Stays In Quarantine

A woman who was put in isolation at Newark Liberty International Airport remains under quarantine, despite a preliminary test that found she did not have the deadly Ebola virus. The health care worker was isolated Friday as she returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa. She had no symptoms of the disease, but after she developed a fever, she was taken to a nearby hospital.

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Iraq
5:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Turkey Is A 'High-Maintenance Ally' In Fight With ISIS

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Global Health
5:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

New Mandatory Quarantines May Drive Away Ebola Volunteers

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
5:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Ballot Questions Draw Voters In 43 States

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
5:01 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

No Quick Fixes For Drivers Affected By Air Bag Recall

The 2002 Honda CR-V is one of dozens of car models subject to a recall for faulty air bags. The air bag manufacturer, Takata, supplies bags for more than 30 percent of all cars and is one of only three large air bag suppliers.
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:09 pm

Most auto recalls usually involve one carmaker at a time, but a massive recall this week affects not just one, but 10, ranging from BMWs to Toyotas.

At the center of it is Takata, a little-known but extremely important auto parts maker. The company makes more than one-third of the air bags in all cars.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

New York, New Jersey Will Quarantine All Travelers With Ebola Contact

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, left, listens Friday as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie talks at a news conference in New York. The governors announced a mandatory quarantine for people returning to the United States through airports in New York and New Jersey who are deemed to be at "high risk" for Ebola.
Mark Lennihan AP

Travelers returning to New York and New Jersey from West African nations will be put under mandatory quarantine orders if they may have had contact with Ebola patients, Govs. Andrew Cuomo and Chris Christie announced Friday, The Associated Press reports.

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Around the Nation
4:35 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Was CDC Too Quick To Blame Dallas Nurses In Care Of Ebola Patient?

Dallas nurse Nina Pham speaks at a press conference after she was confirmed free of Ebola and released from a National Institutes of Health facility on Friday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Dallas nurse Nina Pham was discharged from a National Institutes of Health hospital in Maryland Friday, where doctors confirmed she was free of the Ebola virus.

Pham's colleague Amber Vinson is also said to be free of Ebola, though she remains in a hospital in Atlanta.

While their progress is being cheered, many nurses around the country still feel their profession unfairly received blame for the errors in treating Ebola in Dallas.

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This Week's Must Read
4:31 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

For The Midterm Elections, A Book On 'What It Takes' To Win

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

In less than two weeks, Americans will go to the polls to vote in the midterm elections. At least, some of them will — about 40% of eligible voters, if past elections are any indication. This year's races have already made stars — some rising, some falling — out of Americans hoping to represent their states and districts.

Some, like Kansas Senate hopeful Greg Orman and Georgia governor candidate Jason Carter, may pull off surprising victories. Others, like Wendy Davis in the Texas governor race have seen their once bright lights fade.

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Goats and Soda
3:28 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Fighting The Stigma Of Ebola With Hugs

Patient Nina Pham is hugged by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, outside of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., on Friday. Pham was discharged after testing free of Ebola.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

When Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, hugged Dallas nurse Nina Pham on Friday it was as much to combat the stigma surrounding the deadly virus as to celebrate her being free of Ebola.

Fauci said it was an honor to treat Pham and get to know "such an extraordinary individual." Pham said she felt "fortunate and blessed" and put her trust "in God and my medical team."

Pham later met with President Obama in the Oval Office. The president and the nurse also hugged as news photographers captured the moment.

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Shots - Health News
3:20 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

For Hospitals, Doing More On Ebola May Mean Less Elsewhere

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:50 pm

As Bellevue Hospital in New York City treats its first patient with Ebola, other hospitals around the country are pouring resources into getting ready in case they're next.

Eighty-one percent of hospitals have started training their staff in caring for an Ebola patient, according to a survey of 1,039 members of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. They're the folks who manage infection control in hospitals.

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Law
2:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Terrorism Suspect To Be Tried In U.S. Civilian Court

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Health
2:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

New York City Praised For Response To New Ebola Patient

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Pennsylvania Manhunt Evokes Memories Of The Search For Eric Rudolph

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Robert Siegel talks to former FBI special agent Chris Swecker about the similarities between the manhunt for Eric Frein, a 31-year-old survivalist suspected of killing one Pennsylvania state trooper and critically wounding another in September, and Eric Rudolph, who was responsible for a series of bombings across the southern U.S. in the 1990s.

Politics
2:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

New York Ebola Case Raises Questions About U.S. Readiness

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Energy
2:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Wanted: Wind Turbine Mechanic — Must Be Daredevil, Skilled With Hands

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Politics
2:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

For Republicans, Midterms About Getting Country 'Out Of The Mud'

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
10:10 am
Fri October 24, 2014

In Minnesota, Abandoned Wheelchairs Are Just Part Of The Landscape

A lone Mayo Clinic wheelchair sits on the Cascade Creek walking trail near Kutzky Park in Rochester, Minn.
Elizabeth Baier MPR News

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 1:20 pm

Anyone who has spent much time in Minnesota's "Med City" can't help but notice that wheelchairs are everywhere.

From city parking ramps and downtown sidewalks to park trails and the local mall, the chairs have an inescapable presence.

More than likely that has do to with the fact that Rochester is home to Mayo Clinic, visited by thousands of patients every day. Many of them use wheelchairs to get around. So it's not surprising that they exist in big numbers.

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NPR Ed
9:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Curiosity: It Helps Us Learn, But Why?

The Limbic Reward System lights up when curiosity is piqued.
LA Johnson NPR

How does a sunset work? We love to look at them, but Jolanda Blackwell wanted her 8th graders to really think about them, to wonder and question.

So Blackwell, who teaches science at Oliver Wendell Holmes Junior High in Davis, Calif., had her students watch a video of a sunset on YouTube as part of a physics lesson on motion.

"I asked them: 'So what's moving? And why?'" Blackwell says. The students had a lot of ideas. Some thought the sun was moving, others, of course, knew that a sunset is the result of the earth spinning around on its axis.

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Halloween High Jinks For Fun And Nonprofits

Evelyn FitzGerald, 2 months old, is in a Princess Leia — of Star Wars renown — costume made from recycled clothes by her mother Shenandoah Brettell of El Segundo, Calif. "I made the wig out of yarn and the belt out of felt," says Shenandoah, who listens to NPR member station KPCC.
Shenandoah Brettell

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:15 pm

Making costumes from secondhand stuff is a part of the Halloween scene in 2014, according to Goodwill. We call it boocycling.

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Shots - Health News
7:12 am
Fri October 24, 2014

VIDEO: Talking While Female

NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 9:27 am

Ask a woman if anybody has ever complained about her voice and, chances are, you'll get a story. Watch the above animated video, and you'll see what we mean.

Your voice is too squeaky, it's too loud, it lacks authority, it sounds childish, it's grating or obnoxious or unprofessional.

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Health
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Doctor With Ebola In Isolation At New York Hospital

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 5:03 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

With Ferguson Protests, 20-Somethings Become First-Time Activists

Dontey Carter (from left), Mel Moffitt, Lenard Smith, Ned Alexander and Allen Frazier are all members of the Lost Voices group, formed after Michael Brown's death in August. They say they want to ensure justice for Michael Brown and other unarmed individuals killed by police officers.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 9:18 am

In the weeks after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., protesters gathered daily at the site of a burned-out convenience store.

About a block away, the empty lot of a boarded-up restaurant became the campsite for a group of young activists called the Lost Voices. During the protests, the group "invited all the people who can't come out every day and wanted to share the experience with us," says Lenard Smith.

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Sports
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Giants Fans Prepare For World Series To Hit City By The Bay

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 5:03 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
8:03 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Recently Returned From Africa, Doctor Tests Positive For Ebola At NYC Hospital

Police officers stand outside the home of Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, on Thursday in New York. Spencer tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 8:29 am

A patient at a New York City hospital has tested positive for Ebola, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference Thursday.

According to a statement from Doctors Without Borders, a doctor returned to the United States Oct. 12 after working with Ebola patients in Guinea.

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It's All Politics
4:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Meet The Hero Dogs Of The Secret Service

Jordan, one of the dogs being hailed as a hero for attacking a White House fence-jumper Wednesday night.
Courtesy of the Secret Service

Hurricane "enjoys playing with his Kong toy." Jordan is partial to walks around the White House. Both have brown eyes and, according to tweets from the Secret Service, are "ready to work." Meet the hero dogs, who helped take down the latest man to jump the fence at the White House.

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All Tech Considered
4:26 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:57 pm

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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Around the Nation
4:13 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:10 pm

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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Law
3:29 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county.
David Adame AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:15 pm

Miami-Dade County's sex offender residency restrictions — some of the tightest in the country — drew national attention a few years ago when an encampment of sex offenders sprang up on a causeway in Biscayne Bay. After a public outcry, local and state authorities evicted several dozen people, mostly men, from that makeshift settlement.

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Goats and Soda
2:57 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

What's My Risk Of Catching Ebola?

Data sources: David Ropeik/Harvard University, National Weather Service, World Health Organization, Northeastern University Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-Technical Systems, National Geographic, United States Census
Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:09 pm

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

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Politics
2:49 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Democrats Remain Optimistic About Senate, Gubernatorial Races

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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