KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Top Stories

Kenya's opposition leader is asking for "international intervention" as violence is escalating in the country's post-election crisis. Overnight into Sunday at least four people were killed in an "area that's opposition heavy," reports NPR's Eyder Peralta from Nairobi.

"The country's just really tense," Eyder says.

Opposition leader Raila Odinga said those who died overnight were his own supporters and called their deaths "state-sponsored thuggery," reports The Associated Press.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

Zimbabwe's governing ZANU-PF party voted Sunday to remove President Robert Mugabe and appoint ousted Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa to replace him. The move marked a major turn in nearly four decades of the 93-year-old's sometimes brutal and tyrannical rule.

In 2012, after Devin P. Kelley was convicted of domestic violence by a military court, Holloman Air Force Base failed to input that conviction into a federal database used for gun-purchase background checks.

The oversight enabled Kelley to buy multiple weapons from licensed gun dealers, which the ATF says were found at the scene after he killed 26 people at a Texas church.

On Thursday and Friday, five women testified before the Inter-American Court for Human Rights and demanded an investigation regarding sexual torture at the hands of Mexican police forces. The abuse happened in May 2006 following a clash between protesters and state forces in the state of Mexico.

Azzedine Alaia, the French-Tunisian designer known for his figure-sculpting fashions, has died at 77, the French Federation of Haute Couture and Fashion confirmed on Saturday.

In his more than four decades in the fashion industry, Alaia gained a reputation for going rogue; he refused to follow the calendar of international fashion weeks and released his collections only when he was ready. He rose to fame for his body-hugging designs that celebrated the female form.

The Palestinians threatened on Saturday to cease communication with the United States if the White House closes its diplomatic mission in Washington, D.C., lodging a potential thorn in President Trump's plans for Mideast peace.

The State Department says the office of the Palestine Liberation Organization must close under a little-known provision in U.S. law that forbids it from requesting Israelis be prosecuted for crimes against Palestinians. Trump may reverse the closure within 90 days if the Palestinians prove they are engaging in peace negotiations with the Israelis.

Tens of thousands of euphoric Zimbabweans marched through the country's capital on Saturday to celebrate what may be the near end of President Robert Mugabe's reign.

Mugabe, one of Africa's last living independence leaders, had been in power for nearly four decades, until this week when the military ousted him in what it is describing as a "bloodless correction."

Updated on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 9:45 a.m., ET.

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, who resigned his position earlier this month amid political tensions with Saudi Arabia, says he is returning to his country after a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on Saturday.

Hariri told reporters he would clarify his political position upon returning to Lebanon for Independence Day celebrations, the Associated Press reported.

"As you know I have resigned and we will speak about this matter there (Lebanon)," Hariri said.

The head of Puerto Rico's power authority stepped down Friday amid controversy over his handling of a system that still can't deliver electricity to that island two months after Hurricane Maria destroyed the power grid.

Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, resigned as he was unable to shake off questions about a $300 million contract that he had awarded to Whitefish, a small Montana-based energy firm, that was supposed to restore power on the island.

Backflipping Robot Is A Giant Leap For Robot Kind

Nov 17, 2017

Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, was a day filled with news. So much news, in fact, that you might have missed the announcement of a backflipping robot. In less than a minute, the video posted by Boston Dynamics inspired screaming emotions from all corners of the Internet. It's a revelation in robotics, some said. It's the beginning of humanity's end, chirped others.

Ferdie Pacheco, the ringside physician to Muhammad Ali and TV commentator known in the boxing world as the "fight doctor," died Thursday, his daughter announced on Facebook. He was 89.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson announced Friday that he has Parkinson's disease, saying that he first noticed symptoms "about three years ago."

Jackson, 76, released the news in what he called an update "on my health and the future."

The longtime political and social activist, who was part of Martin Luther King Jr.'s inner circle in the 1960s and who later founded the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, said that after noticing signs of the motor system disorder, he attempted to work through it.

At least 20 people have been injured after a massive fire broke out at a senior assisted-living complex near Philadelphia late Thursday, forcing residents to evacuate the building into a 40-degree chill.

The tiny nation of Denmark has just three stations for monitoring atmospheric radiation. Each week, scientists change out air filters in the detectors and take the used ones to a technical university near Copenhagen.

There, Sven Poul Nielsen and other researchers analyze the filters. They often snag small amounts of naturally occurring radioactivity, radon for example.

Comedian Sarah Silverman confronted one aspect of the wave of sexual abuse and misconduct revelations that have come out in recent weeks: the anguish when the perpetrator is a friend.

A workhorse truck and a new supercar are in the works for Tesla, after founder and CEO Elon Musk introduced his company's latest effort to widen the U.S. market for electric vehicles Thursday night. Musk called the Roadster "the fastest production car ever made, period."

Zimbabwe's sidelined President Robert Mugabe, who has been under house arrest since a military takeover earlier this week, is refusing to step down, creating a potential crisis over his succession.

The military staged what it insists was not a coup, but rather a "bloodless correction," on Wednesday, saying its aim was not to target Mugabe himself, but the "criminals around him who are committing crimes." Several senior officials have been detained in the wake of the army's move, according to the BBC.

Former Sicilian Mafia godfather Salvatore "Toto" Riina — who ordered the murder of Italian prosecutors and law enforcement officials who tried to bring him down — died Friday in the prison wing of a hospital in northern Italy.

Riina had reportedly been suffering from heart disease and Parkinson's. At the time of his death, a day after he turned 87, he been in a medically induced coma after two operations for cancer.

Astronomers in California are building the largest digital camera in the world. It will go on a giant telescope taking shape in Chile called the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

LSST is different from most large telescopes. Instead of staring at a tiny patch of the sky and taking essentially one snapshot in time, LSST will take a panorama of every part of the sky...and it will do so over and over and over. The idea is to see what's moving or changing in the heavens.

It's tough getting old, and that goes as much for giant pandas as people.

Veterinarians at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., say Tian Tian, an adult male panda, received laser treatment and acupuncture for what they initially thought was a touch of arthritis in his left shoulder.

During the exam earlier this week while the 20-year-old Tian Tian (pronounced t-YEN t-YEN) was under anesthesia, vets also took blood and urine samples and performed X-rays.

Senior White House adviser and son-in-law to the president Jared Kushner failed to hand over to Senate investigators emails concerning contacts with WikiLeaks and a "Russian backdoor overture," according to a letter sent by two senior lawmakers.

The letter, released Thursday by Sen. Chuck Grassley, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and its ranking Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, says Kushner failed to turn over "September 2016 email communications to Mr. Kushner concerning WikiLeaks" and other emails pertaining to a "Russian backdoor overture and dinner invite."

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

TransCanada, the company that owns and operates the Keystone Pipeline, says that an estimated 210,000 gallons, or 5,000 barrels, of oil have spilled near the small town of Amherst, S.D.

Today in Chicago, Judge Leroy Martin threw out the convictions of 15 men in what defense attorneys call a landmark decision and the "first mass exoneration" in Cook County. The men, who all served prison terms, claim they were framed by former Chicago Police Sgt. Ronald Watts and officers under his command. One of the men, Leonard Gipson, spent four years in prison and says Watts would demand money and then drugs on a person and arrest them if he was not paid.

Updated on Friday, Nov. 17, at 10:30 p.m. ET

Deadly Floods Devastate Western Greek Cities

Nov 16, 2017

At least 15 people are dead and a dozen injured after overnight downpours caused sudden and catastrophic flooding in cities outside Athens, according to Reuters. In western cities like Mandra, Nea Peramos and Megara, citizens lost homes, cars and businesses. Forecasters expect more rain tonight.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

Following criticism of an in-game purchase system in the new game Star Wars Battlefront II, publisher Electronic Arts announced late Thursday, just hours before the game's worldwide release, that this system would be turned off while adjustments are made.

"This was never our intention. Sorry we didn't get this right," said a statement posted on Twitter.

Our original story continues:

By nearly every measure offered by the United Nations, the scale of the tragedy unfolding in Yemen is staggering: More than 20 million people need urgent humanitarian aid. At least 14 million lack basic health care or access to clean water. And more than 900,000 suffer from suspected cases of cholera, a disease that — under almost all circumstances — should be preventable and treatable.

Pages