Words On A Wire

Sundays at 12 noon

Words on a Wire is a show about fiction, poetry, the writing community, the publishing world and whatever other issues concern literary writers and readers of books. Hosted by two active writers, each show will include an interview with an established or emerging writer who has a new book, from famous award-winning veterans to hot young writers with books to watch out for.

On “Poem of the Week” we will read a poem from a collection we love or talk about a new book we have just discovered, or sometimes re-discovered. We also have a segment called “Poetic License” which is our way of giving writers their say. We hand over to writers we admire a few minutes to talk about whatever they want.

  Ross Gay is a American poet and author of 3 books.   His latest collection, Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, was the winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, was  a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, and was nominated for an NAACP Image Award.  Ross joins us on this program to talk about why Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude is all about elegy with healthy doses of joy.

Ross will also read to us "To My Friend's Big Sister" from his collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude.

http://www.rossgay.net/

Aired Aug. 28, 2016

  

  *Rebroadcast from Oct 12, 2014*

  Daniel welcomes Richard Blanco, the poet who read at President Obama's second inauguration.  Blanco's latest work is a memoir, "The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood," and he talks about learning about himself while writing about his Cuban immigrant family, and how he had to separate himself from his "poet" self in order to write his memoir.  The discussion also focuses on the humor in the book, especially Blanco's musings on the culture clash over American vs Cuban food.  http://richard-blanco.com/

Aired Aug 21, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from Oct. 12, 2014*

Taking a page from Richard Blanco's memoir and his frequent reference to The Brady Bunch, host Daniel Chacón offers HIS thoughts on The Brady Bunch and how it was NOTHING like his life at home, and how it was presciently reflective of today's modern family. 

Aired Aug. 21, 2016

  

  *Rebroadcast from Oct. 12, 2014*

Today's Poem of the Week is "The Red Poppy" by Louise Glück, read by local poet, Nancy Lechuga.

Aired Aug. 21, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from Oct 5, 2014*

Host Daniel Chacón talks with Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of the poetry collection "Dandarians."  This collection grew out of "word betrayals," English words misunderstood in transmission from her Japanese mother that came to take on symbolic ramifications in her early years.  Daniel and Lee talk about the interesting words that they have come to love over the years, and explore how Lee's musical background plays into her poetry's musicality.  

For the Poem of the Week, Lee Ann Roripaugh reads the final poem in her collection, Dandarians - "The Violin Thief."

http://www.leeannroripaugh.com/

Aired Aug 14, 2016.

  *Rebroadcast from Oct 5, 2014*

Host Daniel Chacón explores the many interesting collective nouns in our language: murder of crows...glaring of cats...school of fish...and he even tries to make up some new ones, too!

Aired Aug. 14, 2016

  **Rebroadcast from July 13, 2014**

Host Daniel Chacon reflects on the genius of Dr. Seuss...including why Seuss reminded him of Edgar Allan Poe.

Aired August 7, 2016

  

  *Rebroadcast from July 13, 2014**

Daniel talks with Heather Hartley, author of the poetry collection "Knock Knock."  Heather is the Paris editor for Tin House magazine and curates Shakespeare & Company Bookshop's weekly reading series in Paris.  She was also a visiting online MFA professor at the University of Texas at El Paso.  Heather talks about how her move to Paris inspired "Knock Knock," and why much of poetry is either about or inspired by travel.  In this interview, she also explains why the works of Dr. Seuss were such a huge influence on her poetry, and why humor is so very important in writing poetry.  http://www.heatherhartleyink.com/

For today's Poem of the Week, Heather Hartley treats us to a poem from her forthcoming collection, Adult Swim.  

Aired Aug. 7, 2016

  

*Rebroadcast from June 1, 2014*

Host Daniel Chacón talks about rediscovering "duende"while reading guest Ed Hirsch's book "The Demon and the Angel."

Aired July 31, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from June 1, 2014*

Daniel talks with poet & critic, Edward Hirsch, about his latest book, A Poet's Glossary, which is not so much a book of definitions as it is an exploration of the history of the terms and how those terms interrelate to each other.  Hirsch explains why it took 15 years to compile the information for this book, and why he believes it can still be more expansive (it's already over 700 pages long).  We'll learn about the terms "Duende," "Flarf," and "Spam Poetry."  

This week's Poem of the Week is read by our guest, Edward Hirsch.  He reads "To Poetry."

Aired July 31, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from June 1, 2014*

For this week's Poetic License, Fresno poet Marisol Baca returns to share a couple of poems that reflect upon the world she lived in as a childhood dreamer.  We'll hear "Horno" and "The Discovery."

Aired July 31, 2016

*Rebroadcast from May 25, 2014*

  For this week's Poem of the Week, local poet Nancy Lechuga reads "Myrtle" by John Ashbery.

Aired July 24, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from May 25, 2014*

And in this week's Poetic License, writer Marisol Baca reflects on her grandmother's kitchen in Albuquerque, where she spent much of her youth.  The piece is called The Kitchen Table.

Aired July 24, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from May 25, 2014*

Host Daniel Chacón shares his experiences discovering cities.  Daniel often doesn't have an itinerary when he enters a new city - he enjoys absorbing a city's energy and discovering the city without a plan.  He shares his experiences walking in Mexico City and Paris. 

Aired July 24, 2016

 

  *Rebroadcast from May 25, 2014*  

Daniel talks with writer Michael Nava, whose latest novel, The City of Palaces, is set in pre-Revolutionary War Mexico during the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz.  Nava is also a lawyer who is a staff attorney at the California Supreme Court, and he explains how he balances his time as an attorney and a working writer.  Nava also talks about his Henry Rios mystery series, which were centered around an openly-gay Los Angeles criminal defense lawyer, published from 1986-2000.  http://michaelnavawriter.com/

Aired July 24, 2016

    

**Rebroadcast from May 18, 2014**

 Host Daniel Chacón talks with Shirley Reva Vernick, author of the YA novel, "Remember Dippy."  Shirley started out as a print journalist and later made the move to fiction writer.  She talks about how she connects with a teenage brain to tell a relatable story.  "Remember Dippy" is published by El Paso's own Cinco Puntos Press, and Shirley, who is based out of New England, talks about why she felt at home with Cinco Puntos.  Aside from being a writer, she also runs the popular storytelling website, http://storybee.org/.  Learn more about Shirley and her work at http://shirleyvernick.wordpress.com/.

Aired July 17, 2016

  

  *Rebroadcast from May 18, 2014*

Sam Calvin Brown, a bilingual MFA student at UTEP in Creative Writing, reads today's Poem of the Week:  "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" by William Butler Yeats.

Aired July 17, 2016

  *rebroadcast from May 18, 2014*

In this week's Poetic License, Emily Yoon, an MFA Poetry student at New York University, explains why poetry is like a hand, reaching out to its reader.  Emily is the host of the podcast "Late Night New York"  http://latenightlibrary.org/category/podcasts-2/late-night-new-york/, a short-form podcast featuring a diverse array of talented authors reading at the Franklin Park Reading Series in Crown Heights Brooklyn.

Aired July 17, 2016

   *Rebroadcast from May 18, 2014* 

Host Daniel Chacón reflects on the loss of our sense of fascination upon reaching adulthood, and why writers must try to connect with their inner child to spark the imagination.

Aired July 17, 2016

 

  *Rebroadcast from Nov 16, 2014*

   Daniel talks with his friend, author Dimitri Keriotis.  Dimitri is the author of the new story collection, "The Quiet Time."  The book is Dimitri's first, and he discusses how his travels around the globe, and especially Central Africa, inspired the stories in the collection.  http://dimitrikeriotis.com/

Aired July 10. 2016

    

*Rebroadcast from Nov 16, 2014*

Today's Poetic License is presented by writer and retired El Paso teacher, Azucena Dominguez.  She reflects on her first kiss, which turned out to be quite painful!

Aired July 10, 2016

  *Rebroadcast from Nov 16, 2014*

Host Daniel Chacón has something to say about healthy eating, and how hard it is to eat healthy if you grew up in a Mexican household.

Aired July 10, 2016

  **Rebroadcast from Sept 13, 2015*

  Hosts Daniel Chacon & Tim Hernandez discuss why writers are drawn to writing in the voice of a famous writer.  Daniel wanted to write as George Eliot, while Tim has written about the Mexican girl in Kerouac's "On the Road."  

Aired July 3, 2016

  

*Rebroadcast from Sept 13, 2015*  

Quetzani Montaño Sevilla reads Emily Dickinson’s “I Heard a Fly Buzz.”

Aired July 3, 2016

 *Rebroadcast from Sept 13, 2015* 

  Daniel Chacon and Tim Hernandez talk with author Nuala O'Connor, who also writes as Nuala Ní Chonchúir.  Her latest book, MISS EMILY, re-imagines the life of famed poet Emily Dickinson and her interactions with her Irish domestic, Ada Concannon.  Nuala explains her fascination with Dickinson (down to her baking prowess), and explains why she wanted to keep this fictionalized version of Dickinson true to her real life character.  http://www.nualanichonchuir.com/

Aired July 3, 2016.

  **rebroadcast from June 28, 2015**

Retired educator and writer Azucena Dominguez shares a Poetic License about a first date that never was.

Aired June 26, 2016

 

  **Re-broadcast from June 28, 2015**

  

  Daniel talks with Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, Tracy K. Smith.  She has written her first memoir, Ordinary Light, and she talks about why she waited many years to write about the death of her mother.  She also explains why the memoir allowed her to explore the subject of race and to reflect on how her parents lived & coped in the segregated South.  And in this online-only extended interview, Tracy reflects on the conflicts she encountered between religion and reason in her upbringing.

Tracy K. Smith also reads today's Poem of the Week: "In Brazil" from the collection Duende.

Aired June 26, 2016

earthporm.com

  Host Daniel Chacón talks about the ways we infuse metaphor into images or language.  He uses as an example the metaphorical possibilities of the image of a flower growing in cracked concrete.  Often, metaphor is often imposed on images and words when it isn't necessarily implied by the author.

Aired June 19, 2016

  Keith Leonard is a visiting lecturer in Creative Writing at Indiana University.  He grew up in Martha's Vineyard, where the town's isolation, in stark contrast with the booming tourist season, later inspired his words.  His debut collection is called "Ramshackle Ode."  Leonard's odes are a means to work through difficulty to reach a measure of joy.  

For our Poem of the Week, Keith Leonard reads "In the Headwinds of a Fable" from Ramshackle Ode.

*this is an online-only extended version of the interview that aired on KTEP*

Aired June 19, 2016

  Host Tim Z. Hernandez praises guest Ire'ne Lara Silva, and relates her use of words to the Mexican curandera María Sabina, who believed in the power of introspective, sacred words to eradicate illness.

Aired June 12, 2016

Pages