KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Science Studio

Sundays at 7pm

Science Studio is a fascinating 30-minute look into the ever progressing world of science. For nearly fifteen years, the show has taken in depth looks into all aspects of scientific researches and discoveries. Hosts Dr. Keith Pannell and Dr. Russell Chianelli, discuss their concerns on health and the environment. With two educated science connoisseurs, Science Studio helps you understand the inner workings of today’s science.

Science Studio also features Medical Discovery News, a weekly program that provide insights into a broad range of biomedical science topics. Biomedical science is research that addresses human health – from the study of important molecules, to clinical trials of new drugs and therapies. The story of these areas is a window on the future of medicine. We will also offer important basic information about your health. Our hope is that these episodes stimulate you to think, question and appreciate how science impacts you and your world. Medical Discovery News is produced by the University of Texas Medical Branch. 

Recently there has been a rise in antibiotic resistant bacteria. In order to address this rising concern a new approach has been developed, antisense antibiotics.  Dr. Bruce Geller, professor of microbiology at Oregon State University is one of the leading researchers in this new approach and he discusses what exactly are antisense antibiotics. 

http://microbiology.science.oregonstate.edu/content/bruce-geller

Aired March 19, 2017

Asteroids! What do you know about asteroids? Well it turns out we can learn plenty from asteroids but there is a particular reason why asteroids have become the front and center of attention recently. As it turns out asteroids can be source of precious metals, many of which do not exist here on earth. CFA Astronomer Martin Elvis of the Smithsonian Institute at Harvard is one of the leading advocates in the mining of asteroids and discusses the reason for and benefits of mining asteroids. 

https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/news/su201418

Aired March 12, 2017

Hector Garcia is an evolutionary psychologist and he will be sharing his ideas about the nature of god and religion based on our evolutionary psychology. He will also be discussing his book "Alpha God: The Psychology of Religious Violence and Oppression". Garcia is from  the Veterans Administration in San Antonio and an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio. 

https://evolution-institute.org/profile/hector-garcia/

Aired March 3, 2017

For centuries mankind thought there was a distant planet out there beyond from what was already known, Planet X. Well it turns out there is a planet out there, what was once thought to be Planet X is now known as Planet 9. Professor Mike Brown from  CalTech joins Dr. Pannell to discuss his discovery of the distant Planet 9. Mike Brown is a Professor of Planetary Astronomy at the California Institute of Science. He will provide some illumination on Planet 9. 

http://www.caltech.edu/news/caltech-researchers-find-evidence-real-ninth-planet-49523

http://web.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/

Aired. Feb 26, 2017

People who can learn in groups can do better than those individually, that is the driving concept behind Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL). This week on Science Studio Dr. Pratibha Varma-Nelson, a world authority in the concept of PLTL, discusses the importance of PLTL and how it functions. 

http://pltlis.org/recognition-of-dr-pratibha-varma-nelson/

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

SCIENCE STUDIO: Irene Avila and Diversity

Feb 12, 2017

In this episode of Science Studio host Dr. Keith Pannell is joined by Dr. Irene Avila to discuss diversity in the field of science. Dr. Avila is a special assistant within the director's office of the National Institutes of Health. She is in charge of a sub group in the looking at how to enhance diversity within the man power of the nation.

Aired Feb. 12, 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4XzLDM3Py8

Science magazine recently came out with the most important discoveries in science from 2016 and number two on this list was the work on the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO for short. But what is LIGO? Dr. John Veitch from the University of Birmingham, who is one of the 1000 scientists participating in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, joins the show to discuss what is LIGO and the search for gravitational waves.    

http://ligo.org

Aired Feb. 5, 2017

http://home.slac.stanford.edu/photonScienceFacultySearch.html

Open SESAME! And no we are not talking about Ali Baba in this case. SESAME is an acronym for Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East. But what exactly does that mean? A synchrotron light produces very intense pulses of light that allows detailed studies of various objects. Join hosts Dr. Keith Pannell and Dr. Russell Chianelli as they speak to Stanford professor Herman Winick  about his role and involvement in SESAME.

http://www.sesame.org.jo/sesame/index.php

Aired Jan. 29, 2017

 

Jeff Sloan of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) Project Lead.  Unmanned Aircraft Systems are more widely known as drones.  The USGS has been using drones for a variety of reasons, including bird census counts, elk surveys, looking for dinosaur prints at White Sands National Monument, and much more.  Keith and Jeff have a not-so-secret desire to map golf courses...

Aired Nov 8, 2015.

Jeff Sloan of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) Project Lead. Unmanned Aircraft Systems are more widely known as drones. The USGS has been using drones for a vairety of reasons including bird census counts, elk surveys, looking for dinosaur prints at White Sands National Monument, and much more. Keith and Jeff have a not-so-secret desire to map golf courses....  

Orginally Aired November 8, 2015

Alejandro Briseño, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Polymer Science and Engineering, shares the groundbreaking work his research team has achieved through the study of organic and polymer semiconductor single crystals, polymer semiconductor devices and synthesis of novel organic and polymer semiconductors.

Ulises Ricoy, PhD, Chair of Department of Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Science at Northern New Mexico College, shares his expertise on neuroscience and its relation to addiction.

Dava Sobel was this week's Science Studio guest. Her book, "The Glass Universe," reveals the little-known true story of women in science in the mid-nineteenth century that led to remarkable discoveries. She joins host Dr. Keith Pannell as they discuss her book and learn all about the ladies from the Harvard College Observatory.

Dr. Keith Pannell and Dr. Russell Chianelli visit with John Ridley, professor of Geology at Colorado State University in Fort Collins.  

Jono Neiger is a conservation biologist, a permaculture educator, and a designer, and he joins us to talk about how the practice of permaculture lends itself to a sustainable environment.  Permaculture isn’t just an agricultural practice, but a way to sustainably design buildings, improve food production, and design smarter technology.

Neiger is the author of “The Permaculture Promise.” 

Aired Dec. 4, 2016

Yale University

WWJD?  What Would Jedis Do?  That's the question Jaehong Kim asked himself when he was designing technology to make water clean and useable for populations that cannot control their water quality.  He talks about how his Jedi approach could lead to innovative coatings and treatments to water bottles.

Jaehong Kim is Chair of the Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department at Yale University.

Aired Nov. 27, 2016

Most of us have heard of Einstein's Theory of Relativity.  And many of us have also heard of quantum theory. Why don't these two theories correspond to each other?  On this program we'll visit with Ken Wharton of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at San Jose State University.  He'll explain why he wants to recast quantum theory in a way that's compatible with our current knowledge of Space and Time.  He'll also tell us why the laws of physics work the same forwards as backwards.

Aired Nov 20, 2016

Naval Research Laboratory

Radiation from the sun relentlessly bombards the earth, and our atmosphere protects us from photons and solar wind.  How much does this solar radiation contribute to climate change?  On this program, we'll visit with Judith Lean, researcher with the Naval Research Laboratory's Space Science Division.  She'll talk about solar radiation, solar cycles, and whether these cycles are reflected in the Earth's ever-increasing surface temperature.

Aired Nov 13, 2016

We'll revisit Statistics in this episode with Mindy McCann, Professor and Graduate Coordinator for the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University.   She'll discuss her early fascination with statistics, and familiarize us with the concepts of Multiple Comparisons, Confidence Intervals, and Error Rates.  McCann will also explain why one can never have a zero-percent error rate in statistical studies.

Aired Nov 6, 2016

Campus Faculty Association, University of Illinois

Lawrence Hubert is Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Psychology, Statistics and Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  He is also a co-author (with Howard Wainer) of the text, “A Statistical Guide for the Ethically Perplexed.”  He joins us on this program to talk about his "accidental" career path that began with Sputnik, and about the controversy that sometimes surrounds statistics and reproducibility.

Aired Oct. 30, 2016

What does it mean for a university to have sustainability practices?  At New Mexico State University and the University of Texas at El Paso, efforts are underway to reduce energy costs and they are already showing significant results.  We'll visit with Joni Newcomer, Communications & Sustainability Manager at NMSU; and Luis G. Perez, Manager of Campus Sustainability and Energy Conservation at UTEP.  They'll discuss the successes at their respective campuses, and what they hope to achieve in the future.

Aired Oct. 23, 2016

Labeeda Hameed

Zafra Lerman is a Distinguished Professor of Science and Public Policy Emerita at Columbia College in Chicago.  Lerman is a scientist and a humanitarian, and she was recently recognized for her work with the 2016 Andrei Sakharov Award for human rights from the American Physical Society.  She joins us to tell us why she got involved in humanitarian issues...how she managed to sneak out at nighttime to meet with dissidents while visiting the USSR...and how an idea to bring Middle Eastern scientists together grew into the Malta Conferences, which aims to promote peace by bringing together scientists who might otherwise be stifled by their respective governments to build collaborations and partnerships.  

Aired Oct 16, 2016

Purdue University image/courtesy of Kuhn and Rossmann research groups

Michael Rossmann is the Hanley Professor of Biological Sciences at Purdue University.  He joins us to talk about viruses, namely the Zika virus.  The structure of the Zika virus was discovered by a team at Purdue, and this discovery will provide insights for researchers looking to discover a vaccine or a cure.  We'll learn that the Zika virus was first detected decades ago in Ugandan monkeys, but it is a major health concert today because of the virus' cross-species jump to humans.

Aired Oct. 2, 2016

Systems Ecology Laboratory

Craig Tweedie is director of the UTEP Environmental Science & Engineering Program.  He has traveled all over the world, from the Antarctic to the Arctic studying the impact of climate change on various ecosystems.  He joins us on the program to tell us about the big impact a warming climate has played in Alaska and in the Arctic.  A look back at a half century of research shows that northern Alaska's coastal erosion has increased by 25%-30% in the last 50 years...some regions are losing 8-10 meters of coastline a year.  And an area of ice the size of Texas in the Arctic no longer exists.

Aired Sept 25, 2016

Roatán Institute for Marine Sciences

  Coral reefs worldwide are under stress due to a combination of manmade and natural causes.  Coral bleaching results from warming oceans and other stresses, and on this program we'll visit with Jennifer Keck, Education & Research Coordinator, Roatán Institute for Marine Sciences, Anthony's Key Resort, Roatán, Bay Islands, Honduras.  The Mesoamerican Barrier Reef stretches from Mexico down to Honduras, and Keck explains how the Institute has been monitoring the health of the reef at the Bay Islands.  She also talks about a coral nursery program that aims to propagate new reefs from coral fragments attached to a PVC pipe "tree."

http://www.roatanims.org/

Aired Sept 18, 2016

MSU College of Communication Arts and Sciences

  Science, when communicated well to an audience, can make a difference in public opinion about topics such as medicine or climate change.  On this program, we'll talk to John C. Besley, Associate Professor and Ellis N. Brandt Chair in Public Relations at the College of Communication Arts & Sciences at Michigan State University.  He studies how our perceptions of science & technology can potentially have health or environmental impacts.  

Aired Sept 11, 2016

  

  The American Chemical Society (ACS) is the world's largest scientific society, and this year they will be selecting a new president to serve in 2017.  On this program, we'll hear from this year's candidates: Peter K. Dorhout, Vice President for Research at Kansas State University, and Thomas R. Gilbert, Acting Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Northeastern University.  The candidates will talk about some of the issues important to the chemical community, including the rising unemployment rates of newly-graduated chemists.

Learn more about the candidates at http://www.peterdorhoutacs.com/ and https://sites.google.com/site/thomasgilbertacs/.

Aired Sept 4, 2016

Oregon State University

**Rebroadcast from Feb. 24, 2013**  

Keith talks with May Nyman, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Oregon State University.  She talks about her time at Sandia National Laboratories researching nuclear waste management and using titanium dioxide to quickly and more efficiently absorb radioactive strontium, neptunium, and plutonium.  She also talks about the benefits of virtual collaboration with other universities on conducting research. 

http://nyman.chem.oregonstate.edu/

Aired Aug. 28, 2016.

  

  

  *Rebroadcast from Feb 10, 2013*

Keith talks with Gregory O.D. Smith, Chairman of URENCO United Kingdon, and Chief Cultural Officer at URENCO Group.  At the time of this interview in 2012, Smith was president and CEO of EURENCO, a uranium enrichment company located in Eunice, New Mexico.  Smith talks about the large, fast centrifuges that separate uranium-238 from uranium-235 and result in an enriched uranium product for nuclear power plants. www.eurenco.com

Aired Aug 21, 2016

Texas A&M

  

*Rebroadcast from Feb 3, 2013*

  Keith & Russ talk with Kevin Burgess, Professor of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station TX.  Burgess talks about the importance of learning how proteins interact, and which molecules interact best with others.  Resulting research has led to advances in fighting HIV, diabetes, and cancer.  Burgess also talks about his work with florescent molecules and how they can be used to mark DNA strands or view interactions between proteins inside a cell. 

Aired Aug. 14, 2016

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