KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Science Studio

Sundays at 7pm

Science Studio is a fascinating 30-minute look into the ever progressing world of science. For nearly fifteen years, the show has taken in depth looks into all aspects of scientific researches and discoveries. Hosts Dr. Keith Pannell and Dr. Russell Chianelli, discuss their concerns on health and the environment. With two educated science connoisseurs, Science Studio helps you understand the inner workings of today’s science.

Science Studio also features Medical Discovery News, a weekly program that provide insights into a broad range of biomedical science topics. Biomedical science is research that addresses human health – from the study of important molecules, to clinical trials of new drugs and therapies. The story of these areas is a window on the future of medicine. We will also offer important basic information about your health. Our hope is that these episodes stimulate you to think, question and appreciate how science impacts you and your world. Medical Discovery News is produced by the University of Texas Medical Branch. 

***Original Broadcast Date November 6, 2016***

We'll revisit Statistics in this episode with Mindy McCann, Professor and Graduate Coordinator for the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University.   She'll discuss her early fascination with statistics, and familiarize us with the concepts of Multiple Comparisons, Confidence Intervals, and Error Rates.  McCann will also explain why one can never have a zero-percent error rate in statistical studies.

Aired August 20. 2017

Purdue University image/courtesy of Kuhn and Rossmann research groups

***Original Broadcast Date October 2, 2106*** 

Michael Rossmann is the Hanley Professor of Biological Sciences at Purdue University.  He joins us to talk about viruses, namely the Zika virus.  The structure of the Zika virus was discovered by a team at Purdue, and this discovery will provide insights for researchers looking to discover a vaccine or a cure.  We'll learn that the Zika virus was first detected decades ago in Ugandan monkeys, but it is a major health concert today because of the virus' cross-species jump to humans.

Aired August 13, 3017

Systems Ecology Laboratory

***Original Broadcast September 25, 2016***  

Craig Tweedie is director of the UTEP Environmental Science & Engineering Program.  He has traveled all over the world, from the Antarctic to the Arctic studying the impact of climate change on various ecosystems.  He joins us on the program to tell us about the big impact a warming climate has played in Alaska and in the Arctic.  

*** Originally aired December 4, 2016***

Jono Neiger is a conservation biologist, a permaculture educator, and a designer, and he joins us to talk about how the practice of permaculture lends itself to a sustainable environment.  Permaculture isn’t just an agricultural practice, but a way to sustainably design buildings, improve food production, and design smarter technology.

Neiger is the author of “The Permaculture Promise.” 

Aired July 30, 2017

***Original Broadcast Date: February 15, 2015***

Keith & Russ welcome Robert S. Kerbel, senior scientist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada.  Kerbel explains how regular chemotherapy for cancer patients often involves a "maximum tolerated dose" of treatment, which often taxes the patient and requires several days of recovery before the next treatment.  With metronomic chemotherapy, researchers hope to lower the dose of drugs and make the dosage more frequent.  

Aired July 23, 2017

NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

***Originally Aired Feb. 7, 2016***  

Dr. Jim Murphy, Associate Professor in New Mexico State University's Astronomy Department will give us a primer on Mars.  What is the composition of the Martian atmosphere, and how do scientists determine that information?  Martian weather has many similarities with Earth's weather: seasons, dust storms, and weather systems.  The Martian day is also very similar to Earth's 24-hour cycle.

Aired July 16, 2017

Val Altounian, Science Magazine

*** Orginally Broadcast on January 17, 2016***

Science Magazine recently reported on the Top Scientific Breakthroughs of 2015, and on this episode of Science Studio, we'll learn about two of them: CRISPR Gene Editing Technology, and Reproducibility in Psychology.

Charlotte Vines and Colin Bill of the UTEP Department of Biological Sciences, tell us how CRISPR allows scientists to deliberately edit DNA to stop the expression of a particular protein.  Drs. Vines and Bill are attempting to use this technology to knock out a gene that sends T-cell leukemias into the brains of children where they are virtually undetectable and untreatable with chemotherapy.

Dr. Lawrence Cohn of the UTEP Psychology Department explains the variability of research findings in the field of psychology.  Various research groups often try to replicate the same study, yet there is much variability in their findings.  Dr. Cohn explores the causes behind the variability.

http://www.sciencemag.org

Aired July 9, 2017

***Originally Aired March 20, 2016*** 

Cisplatin is a commonly used cancer drug, but its use in children sometimes leads to permanent hearing loss.  Tim Hanson, Professor of Statistics from the Department of Statistics of the University of South Carolina, joins us to tell us how statistics is making it possible for health professionals to determine whether the drugs are indeed harmful and whether alternative treatment is preferable for these young patients.

Aired July 2, 2017

***Originally Aired January 3, 2016*** 

Jon Chorover is Professor and Department Head at the Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science at the University of Arizona. 

California State University - Sacramento

***Originally Aired March 2, 2014***

Keith talks with Emir Jose Macari, Dean of the College of Engineering & Computer Science at California State University - Sacramento.  He is also the Director of the California Smart Grid Center.

***Original Broadcast June 10, 2012***

In this past conversation Dr. Pannell and Dr. Chianelli discuss education and women in science with Dr. Cheryl B. Frech from the University of Central Oklahoma. 

***Original Broadcast Date October 18, 2009***

This week on Science Studio we revisit a conversation with Dr. Dieter Cremer who recently passed away. We revisit his story on how he went from studying Russian literature, to becoming a business man to ultimately working in the field of chemistry. 

While science can seem complicated to those untrained in its many fields, some scientists lack the the ability to communicate their findings. Professor Roderick Hart from the University of Texas at Austin discusses the science of communication and how communication plays a pivotal role in our lives from everyday news to sharing information, and how to become an effective communicator. 

Professor of Pathology and Immunology, Manuel Elkin Patarroyo from the National University of Colombia, (Bogota, Colombia) created the first synthetic vaccine.  

Dr. Angel Marti, of Rice University, discusses his studies on amyloid plugs. 

The topic of discussion is all about algae, more specifically the benefits of algae as a fuel and fertilizer. Guest,  Jon Dougal, chairman and founder of SuperAlgae, inc. discusses what inspired him to work with algae, the many environmental and commercial benefits algae can have and the future of algae as a resource. 

When you think about delivery vessels does your mind go to examples like the international space station? Well did you know now scientists are actually synthesizing DNA delivery vessels that are able to take payloads into the cell. That means there is all sorts of medications that can go directly to the cells via this new technology.

Science, when communicated well to an audience, can make a difference in public opinion about topics such as medicine or climate change.  

Hormones play a very important part in your body. The study of hormones is known as endocrinology. In this episode Professor Bert O'Malley M.D. shares his knowledge in the field of endocrinology.

How does the brain work? How do brain cells communicate? Is there a way to curb appetite by tapping into brain cells? Could there possibly be entire symphonies stored in our head?  Melissa Chee, assistant professor of neuroscience from Carleton University at Ottawa Canada. answers these questions and more on this week's program.

https://carleton.ca/neuroscience/people/1058-2/ 

Aired April 1, 2017

The periodic table of elements is like a typewriter for chemists. Like a writer who sits behind a typewriter and uses the keys to create a chemist looks at the periodic table of elements and looks for ways to create. For Professor Gregory Robinson, his creativity comes in the form of creating new molecules.

Recently there has been a rise in antibiotic resistant bacteria. In order to address this rising concern a new approach has been developed, antisense antibiotics.  Dr. Bruce Geller, professor of microbiology at Oregon State University is one of the leading researchers in this new approach and he discusses what exactly are antisense antibiotics. 

http://microbiology.science.oregonstate.edu/content/bruce-geller

Aired March 19, 2017

Asteroids! What do you know about asteroids? Well it turns out we can learn plenty from asteroids but there is a particular reason why asteroids have become the front and center of attention recently. As it turns out asteroids can be source of precious metals, many of which do not exist here on earth. CFA Astronomer Martin Elvis of the Smithsonian Institute at Harvard is one of the leading advocates in the mining of asteroids and discusses the reason for and benefits of mining asteroids. 

https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/news/su201418

Aired March 12, 2017

Hector Garcia is an evolutionary psychologist and he will be sharing his ideas about the nature of god and religion based on our evolutionary psychology. He will also be discussing his book "Alpha God: The Psychology of Religious Violence and Oppression". Garcia is from  the Veterans Administration in San Antonio and an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio. 

https://evolution-institute.org/profile/hector-garcia/

Aired March 3, 2017

For centuries mankind thought there was a distant planet out there beyond from what was already known, Planet X. Well it turns out there is a planet out there, what was once thought to be Planet X is now known as Planet 9. Professor Mike Brown from  CalTech joins Dr. Pannell to discuss his discovery of the distant Planet 9. Mike Brown is a Professor of Planetary Astronomy at the California Institute of Science. He will provide some illumination on Planet 9. 

http://www.caltech.edu/news/caltech-researchers-find-evidence-real-ninth-planet-49523

http://web.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/

Aired. Feb 26, 2017

People who can learn in groups can do better than those individually, that is the driving concept behind Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL). This week on Science Studio Dr. Pratibha Varma-Nelson, a world authority in the concept of PLTL, discusses the importance of PLTL and how it functions. 

http://pltlis.org/recognition-of-dr-pratibha-varma-nelson/

Aired Feb. 19, 2017

SCIENCE STUDIO: Irene Avila and Diversity

Feb 12, 2017

In this episode of Science Studio host Dr. Keith Pannell is joined by Dr. Irene Avila to discuss diversity in the field of science. Dr. Avila is a special assistant within the director's office of the National Institutes of Health. She is in charge of a sub group in the looking at how to enhance diversity within the man power of the nation.

Aired Feb. 12, 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4XzLDM3Py8

Science magazine recently came out with the most important discoveries in science from 2016 and number two on this list was the work on the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO for short. But what is LIGO? Dr. John Veitch from the University of Birmingham, who is one of the 1000 scientists participating in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, joins the show to discuss what is LIGO and the search for gravitational waves.    

http://ligo.org

Aired Feb. 5, 2017

http://home.slac.stanford.edu/photonScienceFacultySearch.html

Open SESAME! And no we are not talking about Ali Baba in this case. SESAME is an acronym for Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East. But what exactly does that mean? A synchrotron light produces very intense pulses of light that allows detailed studies of various objects. Join hosts Dr. Keith Pannell and Dr. Russell Chianelli as they speak to Stanford professor Herman Winick  about his role and involvement in SESAME.

http://www.sesame.org.jo/sesame/index.php

Aired Jan. 29, 2017

 

Jeff Sloan of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) Project Lead.  Unmanned Aircraft Systems are more widely known as drones.  The USGS has been using drones for a variety of reasons, including bird census counts, elk surveys, looking for dinosaur prints at White Sands National Monument, and much more.  Keith and Jeff have a not-so-secret desire to map golf courses...

Aired Nov 8, 2015.

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