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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Politics
2:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

10 Days Into Shutdown, 'We've Got To Do Better Than This'

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the partial shutdown prompted angry debate across the country. But at the center of that debate, we found quiet yesterday. We dropped by a Senate office building where the halls were empty. Papers taped on doors read: We regret that due to the government shutdown our office is closed. *

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National Security
2:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Foundation To Pay Military Death Benefits During Shutdown

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Thursday, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The remains of four American service members were returned yesterday to Dover Air Force Base. They were killed in Afghanistan.

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Around the Nation
2:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Texas Couple Props Up Head Start While Government Is Closed

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And a similar offer of money has propped up some Head Start programs. Laura and John Arnold, of Houston, Texas, pledged up to $10 million to keep the program running in six states.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Head Start is a preschool program for kids from low-income families. And on Friday, it closed down in many places when the government partially stopped. This is how the parent of a Head Start child, Laura Bastion, heard the news.

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Planet Money
1:00 am
Thu October 10, 2013

What A U.S. Default Would Mean For Pensions, China And Social Security

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:38 am

What would happen if Congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling and the U.S. defaults on its debt later this month? The broad economic implications are unpredictable, but a default could cause huge trouble for the global economy.

But whatever happens to the global economy, one thing is clear: People all over the world who have loaned the U.S. government money won't get paid on time.

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Arts & Life
12:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Heroism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown
Victoria Will The Daily Beast

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for a recurring feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. This month her suggestions are all about heroes — whether being heroic means doing something, or not doing something.

Revisiting Black Hawk Down

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Environment
12:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Deal To Save The Everglades?

Mechanical harvesters cut sugar cane on U.S. Sugar Corp. land in Clewiston, Fla., in 2008, the same year the state struck a deal to buy most of the company's Everglades holdings.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:49 am

South of Florida's Lake Okeechobee, hundreds of thousands of acres of sugar cane thrive in the heart of one of the world's largest wetlands. The Everglades stretches from the tip of the peninsula to central Florida, north of Lake Okeechobee.

"The Everglades actually begins at Shingle Creek, outside of Orlando," says Jonathan Ullman of the Sierra Club.

That's nearly 200 miles north of the agricultural land that Ullman and other environmentalists say is crucial to state and federal efforts to restore the wetlands area to a healthy ecosystem.

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The Record
10:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:39 am

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Shots - Health News
3:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

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Around the Nation
5:28 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Chicago Company Aims To Popularize Electric Unicycle

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:17 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Starbucks Offers A Free Cup Of Coffee With A Condition

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with shutdown beverage news. New breweries cannot open. The partial government shutdown prevents the Treasury Department from approving them. You can still get coffee at Starbucks. CEO Howard Shultz, who spoke up for gun rights - then had to ask people to stop bringing guns to his stores - waded into politics again. He's urging people to talk to one another, offering free coffee if you buy someone a coffee - subsidized Starbucks conversation.

Politics
2:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Federal Prison Workers Dismayed By Government Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Research News
2:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

3 Scientists Share 2013 Nobel Prize For Chemistry

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be shared by three scientists who took chemistry inside the world of computing. This powerful technology is now used to develop drugs and perform all sorts of vital tasks in chemistry. The three winners were all born overseas but collaborated in the United States and elsewhere in the 1970s, where they started their work.

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Politics
2:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Rep. Labrador Of Idaho Weighs In On Government Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
1:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

High-End Extras Aren't A Sure Bet For Tribal Casinos

Yvonne Smith is the director of La Rive Spa at Northern Quest Resort and Casino in Washington state. Across the country, Native American tribes are hoping high-end extras will draw visitors to casinos.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:53 am

What used to be no-frills slot parlors off the highway are turning into resort-style destinations with spas, golf courses and luxury hotels. Native American tribes are hoping these added amenities will give them an edge in an increasingly competitive gaming market.

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Parallels
1:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Bound By Blood, Divided By Politics: Three Egyptian Sisters

Egyptian women queue outside a polling station during voting on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of then-President Mohammed Morsi, in Giza, Egypt, last December. In a country divided by a political crisis, families are not spared.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:44 pm

Nagwa, Dina and May are sisters. All three are married, all three have children. All three had always been close — until now.

Egypt's political crisis is changing those relationships. Nagwa and May sympathize with the Muslim Brotherhood. Dina, on the other hand, supports the military, arguing that the generals are just keeping extremists at bay.

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It's All Politics
12:58 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Booker Gets A Run For His Money In N.J. Senate Race

Democrat Cory Booker (left) and Republican Steve Lonegan stand together after their first debate in the race for U.S. Senate on Oct. 4 in Trenton, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:22 am

Cory Booker, the celebrity mayor of Newark, N.J., was expected to cruise to victory in the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Frank Lautenberg. But just a week before voters go to the polls, he's facing a surprisingly strong challenge from Tea Party favorite Steve Lonegan.

The race was supposed to be a mismatch: Booker, the Democrat, and his 1.4 million Twitter followers versus the Republican former mayor of Bogota, N.J. — population 8,000.

But no one told Lonegan.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Shutdown Forces Antarctic Research Into 'Caretaker Status'

The Chalet (right) is the U.S. Antarctic Program's administrations and operations center at McMurdo Station.
Reed Scherer National Science Foundation

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:44 am

Earlier this week we told you that scientists who do research in Antarctica have been on pins and needles, worried that the government shutdown would effectively cancel all of their planned field work this year.

Well, those scientists just got the news they didn't want to hear.

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Around the Nation
5:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

NFL Jaguars, Broncos Have Interesting Point Spread

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 6:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. If you bet on the Jacksonville Jaguars this weekend, your team could be crushed and you could still win. The Jaguars are 0-5. They play Peyton Manning's undefeated Denver Broncos. The Broncos are 28-point favorites, the biggest point spread in NFL history. The Jaguars could lose by 27, you'd still win your bet. But gamble with care. In their big win against Dallas last weekend, Denver did not cover the spread. It is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:33 am
Tue October 8, 2013

No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 6:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It may have been a fearsome predator in its day, but even Tyrannosaurus rex could not escape the government shutdown. A T. rex skeleton, one of the most complete in existence, was headed to the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum this week to star in the National Fossil Day festivities. But with the museum closed, the tyrant lizard will continue to reign supreme at a storage facility in Montana, coming to Washington next spring

Law
2:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Jury Selection To Begin For Trial Of Madoff Employees

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 6:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Nearly five years after Bernie Madoff was arrested for fraud, some of his former employees are about to go on trial in New York. The trial is expected to focus on how much the employees knew about Madoff's multibillion dollar Ponzi scheme. Jury selections gets under way today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Sports
2:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

WNBA's All-Time Top Scorer Tina Thompson Retires

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 6:58 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're going to hear next from a woman who has finished one of the most extraordinary careers in recent sports history. Tina Thompson, of pro basketball Seattle Storm, has retired. She played in every one of the WNBA's 17 seasons. The all-time top scorer, she won four championships, two Olympic gold medals. But she never dreamed of becoming a pro basketball player. That option once hardly existed for women.

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Animals
2:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

The Truth About Lemmings, The Rodent, Not The Political Animal

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 6:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now we have this note as we continue America's most comprehensive coverage of the government shutdown. We have this morning, a scientific clarification about lemmings. Last week, you may recall a Republican lawmaker called his colleagues lemmings. He meant his fellow Republicans were following Senator Ted Cruz on a disastrous mission that led to the government shutdown.

Lemmings supposedly follow each other over a cliff. But we have learned - NPR has learned - that lemming mass suicide is a myth.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Law
1:25 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Calif. Law Allows Undocumented Immigrants To Practice Law

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference in August. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the U.S. illegally.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:32 am

Sergio Garcia passed the California Bar exam four years ago. The bar granted Garcia a law license, but then rescinded it because he was undocumented.

The justices of the California Supreme Court may have been sympathetic to Garcia, but it quickly became clear during arguments they didn't think the law was on his side. Specifically, as the U.S. Department of Justice argued, federal law prevented Garcia's admission to the bar.

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It's All Politics
1:05 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Hastert: Primary Challenges Making Congress 'Kind Of Neurotic'

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert of Illinois is congratulated by members of Congress during the unveiling of his portrait at the Capitol in 2009.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:25 am

When it comes to political deal-making, former House Speaker Dennis Hastert speaks from experience.

"I always had a feeling whenever I had to negotiate ... you really needed to make sure that you knew where the hole in the box was, so if you got in there, you could get out of it again," says the Illinois Republican, who was speaker from 1999 until 2007.

Hastert tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that he can't say whether House Republicans now have themselves in a box in the government shutdown fight because "we don't know what the end of this thing is yet."

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Around the Nation
1:05 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Phase 2 Of BP Trial Focuses On Amount Of Spilled Oil

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen burning in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010. A second phase of the BP trial, which started this week, looks at just how much oil spilled into the Gulf.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 10:48 am

In a New Orleans courtroom this week, BP and the federal government are arguing over how much oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon explosion in 2010.

Oil flowed from the out-of-control well for nearly three months. Just how much oil spilled will be key in determining the amount BP will have to pay in federal fines and penalties.

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Afghanistan
1:03 am
Tue October 8, 2013

As Afghan Presidential Race Begins, Warlords Are Prominent

Abdul Rab Rasoul Sayyaf, an influential lawmaker and religious scholar, waves at his supporters on Oct. 3, after registering his candidacy in next year's presidential election.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 6:26 am

As the war in Afghanistan enters its 13th year, the political and security situation there remains precarious. But the country is hoping to reach a milestone next spring: the first democratic transfer of power in the country's history.

And there's no shortage of candidates vying to succeed President Hamid Karzai — who is barred from running for a third term.

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Heavy Rotation
1:29 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Bill Callahan's "Small Plane" is a favorite of World Cafe host David Dye.
Hanly Banks Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:04 am

It's time to share what 10 of our favorite public radio personalities have been loving lately. Here's a list of this month's Heavy Rotation panelists:

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Europe
5:28 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Bear Breaks Into Siberian Cottage Devours Pot Of Borscht

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. This time it was the bear who broke in. It seemed no one was at home so a Russian bear decided to taste what was on the stove of a Siberian country cottage. Not too hot, not too cold, the pot of borscht was just right. The bear devoured the entire pot of the beet root soup before the owners spotted him, called the police, and the bear, like Goldilocks before him, fled into the forest. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:20 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Lights Go Out During Ravens' News Conference

A blackout delayed last season's Super Bowl as the Baltimore Ravens defeated San Francisco. As the Raven's coach was taking questions Sunday, the room was plunged into darkness. Quarterback Joe Flacco accidentally leaned on a light switch. Later, linebacker Terrell Suggs did the same thing.

Economy
2:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

What's The Cost Of Budget Gridlock?

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 3:33 am

Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about the cost of the government shutdown, and the dangers of the threatened government default.

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