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Mara Liasson

The Republican Party has embraced President-elect Donald Trump's positions on immigration, trade, the deficit and conflicts of interest, but when it comes to Russia, Trump and his party are not even close to being on the same page.

Trump has repeatedly and consistently expressed admiration for Vladimir Putin and has refused to accept intelligence community findings that Russia hacked Democratic Party emails during the campaign. That puts him at odds with almost every other Republican in Washington, D.C.

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Republicans in Congress have tried over and over to repeal Obamacare to no avail. Now, they control both houses of Congress, and they've got an ally in the White House. And now the path is much clearer. Here's Donald Trump just before the election.

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The Republican Party heads into 2017 with more power than it has had for a long time.

For the Democrats, it's a different matter.

Hillary Clinton's loss in the presidential race and Democratic failures further down the ballot have the party searching for a way forward.

Here are five things Democrats need to do, as they look for a path out of the political wilderness:

1. Be clear about how bad things are — and are not — for the Democratic Party.

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Politics In The News

Dec 12, 2016

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The revelation over the weekend that the CIA believes Russia interfered in the election to help sway the vote to Donald Trump isn't going over well with one Donald Trump. Here's the here's the president-elect speaking to Fox News yesterday.

Even before he is sworn in, Donald Trump is putting his own stamp on the role of chief executive.

That has some people rejoicing — and others worried about where he's going to take the country. Here is why some of Trump's critics say the president-elect could be a threat to democratic institutions and why others say those fears are overblown.

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Even before he is sworn in as president, Donald Trump is putting his own stamp on the role of chief executive. NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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President-elect Donald Trump's Cabinet is taking shape. Today he announced that Georgia Congressman Tom Price, a longtime opponent of Obamacare, will be the head of Health and Human Services. Elaine Chao is his choice for transportation secretary.

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President-elect Donald Trump is busy trying to staff his government and decide which of his many campaign promises he wants to keep and which he wants to discard. We will hear from a member of his transition team in a moment.

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The election of Donald Trump was a surprise to pollsters, pundits and, perhaps most of all, the Democratic Party. With Republicans in power in the White House, Senate and House of Representatives, Democrats will now have to figure out their role as the minority party.

Here are four questions the Democrats will have to grapple with as they think about the future.

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If the biggest political story this year is the rise of Donald Trump, then the second-biggest is probably what's happening inside the Republican Party. We're going to dig into that with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara.

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Now we're going to look at some of the political implications of the FBI's announcement as well as some of the other big trends to watch for on Election Day. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here in the studio. Hi, Mara.

Finally. Election Day. It's almost here.

The campaign that many thought would never end is ending tomorrow. Here's our handy guide to some things that the results will tell us — and why they matter for the future.

1. What message do American voters want to send with their choice for president?

Yes, the presidential race is very close, and some public polls show it getting closer as we go into the final hours, but in one sense it's actually been stable for months.

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The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

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It's hard to be any more gobsmacked about the state of the presidential race right now, after a video of Donald Trump making vulgar comments about women surfaced Friday, prompting more than 30 prominent Republicans to call for him to step aside as the nominee.

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