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David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

In 2015, what's American made? The U.S. is known for manufacturing — it's part of our identity, though jobs have been lost. They've gone overseas. Technology has changed the way things are made. Nevertheless, America is still making stuff. And in terms of jobs, the Los Angeles area is the biggest manufacturing hub in the country. There are a few reasons why. There is plenty of space here to build things like factories and runways. That beautiful California weather? It's actually great for...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: We have breaking news this morning of the death of the man who planned the attacks in Paris last Friday. His name is Abdel Hamid Abaaoud. He was in the apartment that police raided yesterday morning in a Paris suburb. And until now, police had said it was difficult to determine whether he had died in that raid. The Paris prosecutor now says that he did indeed die in that raid. And NPR counterterrorism...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris this morning where there is news that the man who is suspected of having planned the attacks here in Paris last Friday that massacred many different locations - that man is dead. Abdelhamid Abaaoud was killed in a dramatic raid on an apartment in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis. And because of the confusing circumstances there, it's taken until now for French...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: We have breaking news this morning of the death of the man who is believed to have planned the attacks here in Paris last Friday. He is confirmed dead by French authorities, and the city is breathing a tentative sigh of relief for now, though this might not be over. There could still be part of a terror cell in the city. His name was Abdelhamid Abaaoud. He was in the apartment that police raided...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Now, as Steve mentioned before his conversation with Mara, the man believed to have coordinated those attacks here in Paris is dead. That is according to French authorities. Abdelhamid Abaaoud was Belgian. He's been described as an operative who carried out the attack for ISIS. He was killed, we're told, in a police raid yesterday in a Paris suburb. And we'll be following that news all morning. Leading...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris. There's a bit of sound here we're hearing from a marketplace, Steve. I took a little trip this morning before much of Paris was awake. I know you and I in Washington, we usually take a walk after the show. With the time change here in Paris, we actually can go out and get some food at the market before the show starts. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: And grab a croissant or something...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Now let's turn to another side of the story. After those attacks in Paris on Friday, a Syrian passport was found beside the body of a suicide bomber. That has many in Europe and the U.S. worrying about the flow of migrants - that it might be bringing in extremists. And my colleague, Joanna Kakissis, has been covering the story from an island in Greece. JOANNA KAKISSIS, BYLINE: Ahmad Abrumiyya (ph) is 28...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris. The day certainly began here more peacefully than yesterday, when a police raid had explosions going off and people hiding in their homes in a Paris suburb. There's still a lot of uneasiness today, though. The target of that raid yesterday in Saint-Denis was the man authorities believe planned the attacks in Paris last Friday. But he was not arrested, and he does not...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: In Paris, has been a chaotic morning here, surreal in many ways. We are sitting in our makeshift studios here overlooking a boulevard in the central part of Paris, where life seems pretty normal. Not so just north of this city in a suburb called Saint-Denis, where there was a police raid early this morning. The police were searching for the man they believe planned the attack in Paris that killed 129...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Residents of a northern suburb in this city woke up to the sound of gunfire and explosions. They were told to stay in their homes. Schools have been closed. This is all surrounding an apartment in the neighborhood, the community of Saint-Denis. Police surrounded an apartment before daybreak, and when they burst in, a woman blew herself up using a suicide vest. French authorities have said the operation...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Let's get the situation now in Paris, the latest. Earlier this morning, in a suburb north of here, French police raided an apartment looking for the man believed to have planned the deadly attacks here last week. They're saying the aim was to stop a follow-up attack here in France. The French President Francois Hollande spoke to a conference of French mayors and said that two terrorists died during a...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: I'm David Greene live in Paris in our makeshift studio that we've set up along Rue Saint-Lazare, a street that leads to a Metro station and commuter train station here in Paris. It has been four days now since 129 people were killed in a massacre in this city. Last night, we were at a cafe just up the boulevard here. The television above the table next to us had the banner headline, France is at war....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris on anything but a normal day. Although people are going through the motions, we have been watching the morning commute in Paris. I went by a metro station this morning. Commuters stopped to pick up a quick latte, maybe a croissant at a coffee stand near the trains. Jonathan Felipe (ph) works at that kiosk. JONATHAN FELIPE: (Speaking French). GREENE: And he was telling me there that he...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene, live in Paris where people are returning to work this morning on a Monday morning like no other. People are going to work on the street behind me, Rue Saint-Lazare, heading to the metro station; it's near a commuter train station - all this after the unimaginable violence Friday night. This morning, I met a 15-year-old girl outside the train station, her name is Louise Adam(ph) and she was...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris. We're in a studio overlooking a major Boulevard in the city leading to one of the major commuter train stations in Paris. Now, we should say news this morning, French police made raids last night here in Paris and across much of the country as they searched for suspects linked to Friday's attacks in Paris that killed 129 people. This is a city in mourning and also clearly in fear....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: I'm David Greene, live in Paris this morning. Our makeshift studio here is overlooking the Rue Saint-Lazare. It's a boulevard with cafes and bistros and some of those classic Parisian apartment buildings. The street, it's a classic Parisian scene. People are walking to the Metro station. They've been going to work here all morning. But this is a Monday morning like no other. News has been breaking this morning...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Good morning. I'm David Greene with an update on a military surveillance blimp that broke loose over Maryland and Pennsylvania this week, ripping power lines and generally causing chaos. The blimp is part of the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System. Wow. You can just call that JLENS. It's a high-tech program, but AP is reporting state troopers had a low-tech solution to...

Fans involved in the baseball playoff series between the Toronto Blue Jays and Kansas City Royals seemed under control — until the gauntlet was thrown by the Kansas City Public Library. The library posted a photo on Twitter of three books stacked so that when you read down the stack, it left a message: But then, the Toronto Public Library responded and the conversation continued: Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Good morning, I'm David...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Now to a company that spent $7 billion on a project that has now decided to abandon it. Royal Dutch Shell announced yesterday that it is shutting down offshore oil operations in the Arctic. The energy giant was drilling some 150 miles off the coast of Barrow, Alaska, and what the company found was pretty disappointing. We reached Amy Myers Jaffe, a professor of energy and sustainability at the...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Now we have a story about one of the world's biggest automakers and how it tried to pull a fast one on environmental regulators. Volkswagen has temporarily halted the sale of many of its diesel cars in the United States. This is after the Environmental Protection Agency said Volkswagen used software that deceived regulators measuring toxic exhaust. The German automaker said today that more than 11...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: OK, I think it's pretty safe to say we've all had misunderstandings. But here's a question. Do you think you're more likely to have a misunderstanding or miscommunication with a close friend or partner or with a perfect stranger? It is moments like this when we like to bring in NPR's Shankar Vedantam. Hey, Shankar. SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, David. GREENE: OK, so you're a good friend. You're a...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngQs0eOeeL4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgs9n0Cw01U When you're out there on the Internet, sometimes it's worth remembering there's a person on the other side of the screen; it could lead to an unexpected connection. This story begins with a guy named Chris Gethard, a comedian who hosts The Chris Gethard Show on the cable channel Fusion. He's funny. And he's weird: Recently, he did a show for an audience of dogs. Dogs in the studio audience, and, he...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: It is possible that you have heard this song. (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET IT GO") IDINA MENZEL: (As Elsa, singing) The snow glows white on the mountain tonight, not a footprint to be seen. A kingdom of isolation, and it looks like I'm the queen. GREENE: This is "Let It Go" from the blockbuster Disney film "Frozen." Parents, you probably know this by heart already. And we are not trying to torture you here,...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: When you walk into a bank and ask for a loan, a banker will pull up your financial history - you know, your bank accounts, your credit scores, your assets and liabilities. This is how the bank determines whether or not you're a good risk. Well, in poor countries, many people have no financial track record. And as a result of that, loans don't get made, businesses don't get started, homes don't get...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: The nation's second-largest health insurer, Anthem, has agreed to buy the fifth-largest health insurer in the country, Cigna, for $48.4 billion. This is the latest in a wave of mergers in the health care industry. NPR's John Ydstie joins us to talk about the merger mania and what might be driving it. Hey, John. JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: Hi, David. GREENE: So let's think back. Three weeks ago, there was this...

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