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Cheryl Corley

Cheryl Corley is an NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

In recent years, Corley has reported on the campaign and re-election of President Barack Obama, on the efforts by Illinois officials to rethink the state's Juvenile Justice System, on youth violence in Chicago, and on political turmoil in the Illinois state government. She's reported on the infamous Trayvon Martin shooting case in Florida and covered tornadoes that have destroyed homes and claimed lives in Harrisburg, Illinois; small towns in Oklahoma; and Joplin, Missouri.

In addition, Corley was among the group of NPR reporters covering the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita as they tore through the Gulf Coast. She returned to the area, five years later, and joined the reporting team covering the impact of the BP oil spill. Corley also has served as a fill-in host for NPR shows, including Weekend All Things Considered, Tell Me More, and Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, Corley was the news director at Chicago's public radio station, WBEZ, where she supervised an award-winning team of reporters. She also has been a frequent panelist on television news-affairs programs in Chicago.

Corley has received awards for her work from a number of organizations including the National Association of Black Journalists, the Associated Press, the Public Radio News Directors Association, and the Society of Professional Journalists. She earned the Community Media Workshop's Studs Terkel Award for excellence in reporting on Chicago's diverse communities and a Herman Kogan Award for reporting on immigration issues.

A Chicago native, Corley graduated cum laude from Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois, and is now a Bradley University trustee. While in Peoria, Corley worked as a reporter and news director for public radio station WCBU and as a television director for the NBC affiliate, WEEK-TV. She is a past President of the Association for Women Journalists in Chicago.

She is also the co-creator of the Cindy Bandle Young Critics Program. The critics/journalism training program for female high school juniors is a collaboration between AWJ-Chicago and the Goodman Theatre. Corley has also served as a board member of Community Television Network, an organization that trains Chicago youth in video and multi-media production.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: It's in details from South Carolina that you sense a community insisting on its humanity in the face of awful news. The news was the killing of nine people in a Charleston church. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: The details come from the local paper, The Post and Courier. It describes a vigil yesterday for the victims. People sometimes applauded. INSKEEP: And when they sang a hymn called "My Hope Is Built," many...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Now a story that's often full of contradictions and controversy - the story of public housing in this country. There's a documentary play on stage in Chicago that's tackling this. It's called "The Project(s)." It focuses on what worked and what went wrong when Chicago tore down its troubled high-rises to build mixed-income communities. NPR's Cheryl Corley has more. CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: In a Southside...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: First lady Michelle Obama returned to her hometown of Chicago yesterday. She told graduates of King College Prep High School that she understood the real story of their South Side neighborhood. (SOUNDBITE ARCHIVED RECORDING) MICHELLE OBAMA: The story of that quiet majority of good folks, families like mine and young people like all of you who face real challenges but make good choices every single day....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Former Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert makes a scheduled appearance in a federal courtroom later this week. When he does, he will join a long line of Illinois politicians who have faced corruption charges. Hastert has not made any public statement since he was indicted last month on charges of lying to the FBI and trying to conceal payments he was making to hide past misconduct. NPR's Cheryl Corley...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Dennis Hastert was the longest serving Republican to serve as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. And yesterday, federal officials announced he has been indicted. They allege Hastert concealed large amounts of cash withdrawals used as payments and then lied to federal authorities about it. Now multiple sources, including The New York Times and NBC News, are reporting that those payments, to...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The images from Baltimore of demonstrations, police in riot gear, looting and outbreaks of violence are familiar to some other cities after encounters with police ended in death for unarmed individuals — primarily black men. Officials say what comes from those tragic encounters can be important lessons about policing and moving forward. In April 2001, Cincinnati Police Officer Stephen Roach fatally shot 19-year-old Timothy Thomas in the city's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, an inner city area,...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: The city of Chicago offered a sweeping package of reparations for men who were tortured by a former Chicago police commander and his so-called midnight crew of officers from the 1970s until the early 1990s. Jon Burge was fired from the police department in 1993. He later served a prison term. Advocates and attorneys for the victims, including Amnesty International, say the reparations package addresses...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: In Chicago, it was a jubilant night for Mayor Rahm Emanuel. The former White House chief of staff won re-election to a second term. Emanuel spent millions of dollars and defeated Jesus Chuy Garcia after being forced into a runoff election. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports. (SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL RALLY) UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Chanting) Four more years. Four more years. CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: With supporters...

Since August, several U.S cities have been at the center of protests about policing and race. Activists in Ferguson, Mo., demonstrated for months in the aftermath of the shooting death of Michael Brown , a black, unarmed 18-year-old killed by a white police officer last summer. They also have demanded resignations and pushed for new laws in what organizers say is the start of a national movement for justice. On a crisp, sunny Saturday afternoon, about 100 people gathered at a school next door...

In the wake of fatal police-involved shootings, cities are looking for ways to institute police department reforms. A community policing program in Racine, Wis., calls for police officers to work out of people's houses in specific neighborhoods. Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: Community policing is getting new attention as protests over police shootings continue around the country. One of the latest incidents happened last month in...

Sigma Alpha Epsilon announced Wednesday a plan to eliminate instances of racial discrimination and insensitivity among its members nationwide. The fraternity's move follows the disbanding of its University of Oklahoma chapter for racially offensive actions. Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DON GONYEA, HOST: The college fraternity whose members were taped singing a racist chant says it will work to create a more open culture. Today, the national executive...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Authorities in Ferguson, Mo., say the two police officers shot at a protest outside the police headquarters have been released from the hospital and are not expected to suffer any permanent injuries. The shooting occurred earlier this morning after the city announced that Ferguson's police chief would resign in the aftermath of a blistering Department of Justice report on the city's police department....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: And we turn now to NPR's Cheryl Corley who is in Ferguson. She's been listening to reaction today. The mayor of Ferguson, James Knowles, held a news conference this evening. And Cheryl, what did the mayor say he's going to do in response to this report from the Justice Department? CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: Well, first the mayor spoke for less than 10 minutes. He read a statement. He didn't take any...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: We go now to NPR's Cheryl Corley in Ferguson. She's been talking with residents in the neighborhood were Michael Brown was shot and killed last summer. And Cheryl, what are you hearing? CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: Well, I've been hearing a lot of emotion. I talked to people in the neighborhood where Michael Brown, as you mentioned, was killed. And there's some satisfaction that the Justice Department...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: President Obama returned to Chicago today to make an announcement in his hometown. The historic Southside neighborhood where he worked as a community organizer is now a new national monument along with two other sites in Hawaii and Colorado. The president also announced another initiative to allow some children and their families free admission to national parks. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports. CHERYL...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: A moment of baseball joy has turned sour. Last year, a Little League team from Chicago made a big impression. Jackie Robinson West lost the league's international World Series, but it won the U.S. championship. Well, today, league officials stripped the team of that championship. The reason - it had players who lived outside the boundaries set for the squad. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports. CHERYL CORLEY,...

Right next to the Chicago River on the city's North Side, Lathrop Homes , with its black, white and Latino residents, is considered the city's most diverse public housing. It's also on the National Register of Historic Places . And with 925 low-rise units on about 30 acres, it's big. But these days, only a fraction of those apartments are occupied. Miguel Suarez has lived in Lathrop Homes for 25 years. He says the Chicago Housing Authority, or CHA, offered people housing vouchers to move...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: As much as President Obama rejects lame duck status, here is one reminder that his time in office is growing short - we're going to find out soon where his presidential library will be located. Chicago desperately wants the library, but it is no sure thing and there's a problem with one of the bids. NPR's Cheryl Corley has more. CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: The University of Chicago, where the president and...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Chicago, New York and Hawaii are all lobbying to be the home of a presidential library for Barack Obama. It might seem like the president's hometown would have the edge, but Chicago is scrambling to remain a top contender. More than a thousand people in Chicago showed up at a hearing last night and again today to weigh in on the matter. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports. CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: As hundreds of...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: Inmates imprisoned for crimes they did not commit have often sought help from the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University. Co-director Jane Raley was a fierce advocate of the falsely accused and worked at the center for more than a decade. She died on Christmas Day. NPR's Cheryl Corley has this remembrance. CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: Jane Raley became co-director of the Center on...

This is the time of year when it's not uncommon to see big trucks barreling down highways and streets spreading road salt. Steve Corsi, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, says that translates into high levels of chloride concentrations for rivers like the Milwaukee in Wisconsin or 18 other streams near urban areas in Illinois, Ohio, Colorado and several other states. "At many of the streams, concentrations have now exceeded those that are harmful to aquatic life," he says. Corsi...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Around this country people clearly want their voices to be heard after the killing of two unarmed black men by police officers in New York and Missouri. There have been protests in cities around the United States. Tomorrow the focus turns here to Washington, D.C., for what's being called a national march against police violence. But there are some who want another voice to be heard more - President...

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