Space
6:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Close Encounters Of The Radio Kind? Mystery Bursts Baffle Astronomers

Scientists say a brief burst of radio activity has been detected at the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. This new report resembles previous activity detected in Australia, which has scientist debating possible causes, including solar flares, blitzars, or something even more mysterious.
Brian Negin iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 8:43 am

Astronomers have a mystery on their hands. Two large radio telescopes, on opposite sides of the planet, have detected very brief, very powerful bursts of radio waves.

Right now, astronomers have no idea what's causing these bursts or where they're coming from. And nothing has been ruled out at the moment β€” not even the kind of outrageous claims you'd expect to see in tabloid headlines.

Australian Recordings Inspire Curiosity And Doubt

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Simon Says
6:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Happy Birthday To Amazon, And Its Data Mining

Amazon celebrates 20 years of selling everything from A to Z...and 20 years of mining customer data.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 9:42 am

Amazon is now twenty years old!

In 1994, Jeff Bezos walked out of the Wall Street hedge fund where he worked after they declined to invest in his idea, and began to sell books out of his garage.

Today, Amazon is a retail and entertainment empire, selling books and shoes, computers, overcoats, band saws, sofa beds, kimchi, canned beans, artwork, wine, grills, generators, drones, kitty litter, pool filter pumps and garden gnomes, etc., etc., and more.

Type in "kitchen sink"- you'll find dozens.

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Deceptive Cadence
6:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

War Of Words At Met Opera May Signal Shutdown

Bryn Terfel as Wotan in the Met's production of Wagner's Ring cycle, one of the productions that has been criticized by some as too costly.
Ken Howard Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 11:06 am

When an opera company is in the midst of contentious labor negotiations, the results can be dramatic. This week, the war of words between unions and management at New York's Metropolitan Opera, the world's largest opera company, escalated. An Aug. 1 shut down now seems likely.

At the center of the debate is the ballooning Met budget, which stood at $200 million in 2006 but has since climbed to more than $325 million. Met General Manager Peter Gelb asserts that union salaries and benefits are his biggest costs, accounting for two-thirds of the operating budget.

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Around the Nation
6:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Lost At Sea, Legos Reunite On Beaches And Facebook

These Lego dragons washed up at Bigbury-on-Sea, on the south coast of Devon, England in the late 1990s.
Tracey Williams Lego Lost At Sea

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 9:36 am

Nearly two decades ago, a massive wave struck the Tokio Express, a container ship that had nearly 5 million Legos onboard. The colorful toy building blocks poured into the ocean. Today, they are still washing up on shores in England.

Tracey Williams and her children first happened upon the Tokio Express Legos in the late 1990s. Since then, she's created a Facebook page called β€” Lego Lost At Sea β€” where other collectors show off their findings.

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The Salt
6:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Forget The Fishing Boat: Alaskans Scoop Up Salmon With Dipnets

Using dipnets --€” which have nets up to 5 feet in diameter at the end --€” isn't easy, and the river can get pretty crowded. Robert Carter, a novice dipnetter, holds up the first fish he caught after a day on the Kenai River.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Media

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 10:38 am

Fishing purists, be warned. This story is not for you.

Yes, it's about salmon fishing on a scenic river in Alaska. But no one here is hooking a prize fish in the remote wilderness. This kind of fishing is all about crowds and slop buckets and big contraptions called dipnets β€” and the lengths Alaskans will go to in order to fill their freezers with sockeye salmon.

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Author Interviews
6:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Plot To Poison Famed French Wine Makes For Gripping (Pinot) Noir

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 8:33 am

RomanΓ©e-Conti β€” a legendary French vineyard β€” produces one of the most elegant and extravagantly-priced wines in the world. In January 2010, proprietor Aubert de Villaine received a threat to his livelihood, if not his life: Pay more than 1 million euros in ransom, or his Burgundy vines would be poisoned.

Maximillian Potter first wrote about this plot for Vanity Fair and has now authored a book called Shadows in the Vineyard: The True Story of the Plot to Poison the World's Greatest Wine.

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Movies
6:34 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Silent Film Fans Make Some Noise To Help ID Forgotten Treasures

All Is Lost (1923), in which two lovebirds struggle to get the bride's family's approval to marry, was screened and identified at 2013's Mostly Lost workshop.
Nitrate Film Interest Group Flickr

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 10:38 am

Deep in the archives of the Library of Congress' Culpeper, Va., film preservation center lie thousands of movies in cool, climate-controlled vaults. Hundreds are a century old or older, and unidentified. Their titles have been lost over the years and the library knows little about them, so it started inviting fans of early film to a yearly event called Mostly Lost to help figure out what they are.

And you know what? Those fans are rowdy.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Sat July 26, 2014

At Washington's Training Camp, Fans Are Split On Name Change

A Washington Redskins helmet lies on the turf at the football team's training facility in Richmond, Va.
AP

Washington, D.C.'s football team has opened its training camp in Richmond, Va., just weeks after trademark registrations for its name were revoked.

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The Two-Way
6:01 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Israel Agrees To 4-Hour Cease-Fire Extension In Gaza

A Palestinian man leans on his car after salvaging usable items from his destroyed house in Shuja'iyya neighborhood in east Gaza City, on Saturday. Gazans are taking advantage of a brief cease-fire with Israel.
Oliver Weiken EPA /Landov

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 10:38 am

Update at 12:35 a.m. ET.

Israel has agreed to add four hours to what was originally a 12-hour cease-fire that had been set to expire at 1 p.m. ET (8 p.m. Israeli time).

Yuval Steinlitz, speaking on Israeli television station Channel 10 said the lull would be extended. He said the decision was made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon. The possibility of a further extension would be discussed at subsequent meeting, Steinlitz said.

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Code Switch
4:34 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Dueling Markets Show Native American Art Is Big Business

An estimated 175,000 people travel to New Mexico in August to view Native American art.
Larry Lamsa Flickr

The 93rd annual Santa Fe Indian Market is only a month away. It's the biggest and best-known destination for Native artists and Native art collectors on the planet, and this year, it's got competition β€” a new event called the Indigenous Fine Arts Market.

Native American art and culture is big business. If you don't believe that, look no further than the controversial or illegal sides of the market. If you've been paying attention over the last year, you've seen some lurid and fascinating headlines:

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