Around the Nation
5:23 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Family Dog Eats Couple's Vacation Money

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 10:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The U.S. dollar remains strong, having weathered an economic meltdown, a government shutdown and the stomach of a dog. Wayne Klinkel of Montana was on vacation with his wife. They left the dog in a car when they stopped at a restaurant and returned to find the dog, Sundance, had eaten five $100 bills. Mr. Klinkel's family collected pieces of money as they emerged and sent them to the U.S. Treasury, which has now reimbursed him.

The Two-Way
5:05 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Book News: Tom Clancy Remembered As The Father Of A Genre

Author Tom Clancy, seen in 2004, was an insurance agent before publishing The Hunt For Red October in 1984.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

'Darling' Makes Unfussy Peace With Religion And Sexuality

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:55 am

Richard Rodriguez begins his latest book, Darling, with an unfussy dedication to the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, a Catholic women's group committed to helping the sick and destitute. This Baptism, if you will, is the first and surely the most straightforward indication within the book that Rodriguez intends to delve into his complex relationship with religion. The path that lies beyond that dedication is weird and wonderful, and readers will find that it's far from a direct route.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu October 3, 2013

'The Rosie Project' Will Charm You With Science

Promo image
iStockphoto.com

He's a socially inept scientist who's tone deaf to irony. She's an edgy young woman whose fallback mode is sarcasm. Put them together, and hilarity ensues in Australian IT consultant Graeme Simsion's first novel, The Rosie Project. It's an utterly winning screwball comedy about a brilliant, emotionally challenged geneticist who's determined to find a suitable wife with the help of a carefully designed questionnaire, and the patently unsuitable woman who keeps distracting him from his search.

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The Two-Way
5:00 am
Thu October 3, 2013

On Day 3 Of Shutdown, It's Deja Vu All Over Again

A gate leading into the Joshua Tree National Park California is latched (though not locked) because of the partial government shutdown. Though national parks are technically closed, national forests remain open — they're too large to close.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 11:35 am

Pick your comparison.

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Around the Nation
3:29 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Colo. Flooding Challenges Small Business Owners In Lyons

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 10:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Amid the partial government shutdown, the Small Business Administration will continue only a few programs, including disaster relief loans. That's good news in Colorado, where nearly a thousand businesses were damaged or destroyed by recent flooding. Many more could see sales go down.

Grace Hood of member station KUNC traveled to the small town Lyons to understand the full scope of challenges facing small businesses.

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Business
3:23 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Fashion Designer Mark Jacobs To Leave Louis Vuitton

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 10:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And in other business news, Marc Jacobs is packing his bags. The fashion designer is leaving Louis Vuitton after 16 years. He is expected to focus on an eventual IPO for his own Marc Jacobs brand.

NPR's Margot Adler reports.

MARGOT ADLER, BYLINE: There was a sense of foreboding at Marc Jacob's spring fashion show in Paris. First, the music.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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National Security
3:17 am
Thu October 3, 2013

NSA Head Admits Testing U.S. Cellphone Tracking

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 10:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Top U.S. intelligence officials are now warning about the threat to security posed by the partial federal shutdown. It is now idling most of the civilian workforce in the intelligence community. This follows an earlier warning to Congress about limiting their ability to monitor phone and data traffic.

That plea began during a Senate hearing about possible changes to intelligence laws, as NPR's Larry Abramson reports.

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Africa
3:17 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Even With Peace, It's Hard To Be A Liberian Entrepreneur

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 10:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

For years, the small West African nation of Liberia was associated with violence, child soldiers, blood diamonds, 14 years of one of the world's most brutal civil wars. Now Liberia is celebrating a full decade of peace. Tamasin Ford brings us the story of one enterprising young woman there who's learning to operate in the new Liberia.

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Business
3:17 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Court Ordered To Review BP Payout Formula

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 10:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a reprieve for BP.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The energy company has won a partial victory after a U.S. appeals court halted some payments related to the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. This is a big win for BP which had complained that the payout formula was too generous, and compensated people who were not harmed. Billions of dollars in claims were filed by businesses and individuals in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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