Parallels
12:58 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Will Colombia's Gamble On Medical Tourism Pay Off?

A billboard announces discounts on cosmetic treatments in a street of Cali, Valle del Cauca department, Colombia. In recent years the country has been building facilities specifically designed for medical tourists.
Luis Robayo AFP/Getty Images

International medical tourism is big business worldwide. Countries like India and Thailand lead the way as top destinations for people looking for high quality care at a fraction of the cost back home.

Lately, countries closer to the U.S. are also trying to break into the market — such as Colombia — which until recently was better known for drug trafficking than nose jobs.

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Around the Nation
12:54 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Philippine Ex-Pats In Calif. Contribute To Typhoon Relief

Many Filipinos living in the United States are frantically trying to get in touch with loved ones in some of the areas hardest hit by the typhoon. California, with about a million Filipino immigrants, is the center for a large fundraising effort.

Los Angeles is home to one of the largest concentrations of Filipino immigrants in the U.S. Many across this city are glued to the local Asian TV stations' nightly news broadcasts. Some are turning their worry and stress into action, pounding the pavement to raise money for typhoon victims.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Storm Surge And Low-Lying Philippines Made A Deadly Combination

Residents wade through flood waters on Sunday in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.
Jeoffrey Maitem Getty Images

The worst part of Typhoon Haiyan, which is thought to have killed as many as 10,000 people in the Philippines, was storm surge, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on All Things Considered.

Joyce spoke with storm surge expert Carl Drews, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Dawes says the surge was greatest at Tacloban City, where the Leyte Gulf narrows into the San Pedro and San Pablo Bay.

"That is about the worst path and the worst place for surge," Drews says.

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Shots - Health News
4:00 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Reach Survivors Of Typhoon Haiyan

Military personnel from the U.S. and the Philippines unload relief goods at the Tacloban airport, Nov. 11, 2013. Some reports estimate that 10,000 people may have died in the city of Tacloban.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:08 am

Aid agencies are scrambling to try to get water and food to people in the Philippines who've been left homeless or injured by Typhoon Haiyan.

But reaching some of the areas ravaged by the intense storm is proving difficult. Even when aid can make it onto the islands, it's still not clear what supplies are needed the most.

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Science
3:52 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:13 pm

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan's devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

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All Tech Considered
3:52 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Today's Online Sharing Companies Can Learn From Napster

Napster founder Shawn Fanning in February 2001, after a ruling that the free Internet-based service must stop allowing copyrighted material to be shared.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:02 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog and aggregated at this link, and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Atlanta Braves Shock Fans With Plan To Move To Suburbs

Undeveloped land stands in the area where a new stadium will be built for the Atlanta Braves. Monday, the team announced that it will leave Turner Field and move into a new stadium outside the city.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:21 pm

In a move that took many fans by surprise, the Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the team will move to the city's suburbs, where it will build a new stadium. The team's lease on Turner Field, the Braves' home since 1997, will expire in 2016.

The new stadium will be located "just outside Atlanta's city limits," reports Atlanta Daily World.

Georgia Public Broadcasting's Jane Hammond reports:

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Code Switch
3:11 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In California, A High School That Cheers A-R-A-B-S

The Coachella Valley High School mascot gives the thumbs up at a 2010 football game. Image courtesy of MyDesert.com.
Jay Calderon Courtesy of The Desert Sun

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

Last week, Coachella Valley High School came under fire for the name of its mascot — the Arab. The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee sent a letter to the school, complaining about the way the mascot depicts people of Arab descent. The complaint made the school national news.

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Shots - Health News
2:57 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

$4.2 Billion Deal Highlights Drug Profits From Rare Diseases

Flemming Ornskov, CEO of Shire, says the company's offer for ViroPharma is part of a broader push into orphan drugs.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:14 am

Two drugmakers you may have never heard of just agreed to a big deal.

Ireland's Shire says it's paying $4.2 billion for ViroPharma, which makes a drug to treat a rare condition called hereditary angioedema. People with the inherited condition are prone to swelling that can be life-threatening. About 1 in 50,000 people have the genetic mutation that causes the problem.

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Around the Nation
2:51 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Obama Honors Veterans And Promises Continued Support

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 pm

President Obama's reached out to veterans Monday in a number of ways to mark the Veteran's Day holiday.

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