The Two-Way
7:22 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Kenyans Mutai, Jeptoo Win New York City Marathon

Runners cross the Verrazano Bridge as they race in the New York City Marathon on Sunday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:52 pm

This Post Was Last Updated At 12:06 p.m. ET.

Two Kenyans running similarly tactical races came from behind to win the New York City Marathon on Sunday, marking the third time Kenyans have won both the men's and women's 26.2-mile road race.

Geoffrey Mutai, of Kenya, stayed pretty quiet for the first 20 miles. He nestled in the pack, shielding himself from the wind, then, as the toughest part of the race began, he accelerated past the pack and never looked back, winning the race in 2:08:24.

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The Two-Way
6:18 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Kerry In Egypt For First Time Since Morsi's Ouster

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Egyptian Foreign Affairs Minister Nabil Fahmy ahead of their press conference on Sunday in Cairo.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:39 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Egypt this morning, marking the highest level visit by a U.S. diplomat since the military ousted President Hosni Mubarak in July.

The visit also comes at a time when relations between the two countries are frayed. Reporting from Cairo, NPR's Leila Fadel sent this report to our Newscast unit:

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Sunday Puzzle
6:05 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Regardless Of The Answer, Stay Staid

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

On-air challenge: Each answer is a two-word phrase consisting of two homophones starting with the letter S. For example, given the clue "remained dignified," the answer would be, "stayed staid."

Last week's challenge: Name a brand of beer. Rearrange the letters to name an activity often associated with beer.

Answer: Tsingtao, toasting

Winner: Jacob Taber of New York, N.Y.

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Law
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

N.Y. Stop-And-Frisk Reforms On Hold For New Year, New Mayor

New York police officers walk through a Brooklyn housing development in August.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 1:45 pm

In New York City, the country's largest police force has been involved in a high-profile legal battle over its stop-and-frisk policy.

Few policies of outgoing New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg have been as controversial as stop-and-frisk, the tactic New York police use to stop people on the streets without a search warrant.

The police department says it's been vital in catching criminals and reducing the city's crime rate.

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Africa
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Morsi Trial May Reignite Anger, Violence In Egypt

An Egyptian woman holds a portrait of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi during a protest in Nasr City in Cairo on Friday.
Manu Brabo AP

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:40 am

Egypt's first-ever democratically elected president goes on trial in Cairo on Monday, charged with inciting violence and complicity in the deaths of protesters.

Mohammed Morsi has been detained at an unknown facility since the military ousted him from power last July. His trial is likely to fan the flames of Egypt's ongoing political crisis

The last time Morsi's supporters saw him was on July 2. The former president was delivering a defiant speech as hundreds of thousands of his opponents rallied in Cairo and other cities, demanding his removal.

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Politics
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

McAuliffe Holds Lead In Va. Governor Contest

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

Tuesday's election is seen as a key off-year contest, and a test of strength for both parties leading up to the 2014 elections. But it's beginning to look like a rout. Democrat Terry McAuliffe is leading Republican Ken Cuccinelli by as much as 12 points. The race appears to have turned into a referendum on Cuccinelli's conservative views.

Author Interviews
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Scientist's Scuba Trip Sparks Search For 'Vanished' WWII Plane

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

More than 400,000 Americans died in World War II, but thousands of them were never found. Some died in a prison camp, and others were lost behind enemy lines — and some were on planes that were lost in the vast Pacific ocean.

On Sept. 1, 1944, a massive B-24 bomber carrying a crew of 11 people went down in the South Pacific. Its wreckage remained undiscovered, and the fate of its airmen unknown for decades. Then an American scientist, Dr. Pat Scannon, became obsessed with the mystery of these missing GIs.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
5:03 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Amid 'Satanic' Panic, One '80s Teen Discovered Rushdie's Charms

Public Domain

In 1980s Arkansas, one concern trumped all others: Satan. He whispered backwards on our rock albums. He possessed otherwise good people's bodies and brought them to sin. His worshippers — it was honestly believed and confidently proclaimed — lived among us.

So when my stepmother opened our town's first bookstore I was amazed by one book in particular: an infernal red and black volume called The Satanic Verses.

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North Country Public Radio/Champlain Valley reporter for the Innovation Trail

Sarah Harris covers the Champlain Valley for Innovation Trail. She was an assistant teacher for the first class of the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.  Sarah's work has aired on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition. Sarah is a 2010 recipient of the Middlebury Fellowship in Environmental Journalism, has lived abroad in the Maldives and Nepal, and is a graduate of Middlebury College.

Movie Interviews
2:31 am
Sun November 3, 2013

'Open Secret': When Everyone Knows Who Your 'Real' Mom Is, Except You

For the first 18 years of his life, Steve Lickteig thought Joanie Lickteig was his sister. Both are pictured here in 1969.
Courtesy Steve Lickteig

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:57 am

Steve Lickteig's life as he knew it was a lie. Lickteig thought he was the adopted son of a former World War II vet and his wife. Life was simple: They ran a farm in Kansas, went to mass at the local Catholic church and raised Steve and their eight biological children.

Lickteig wondered who his real parents were and thought he'd set out to find them someday. Then, when he turned 18, two of his best friends told him the truth: His adopted parents were actually his biological grandparents. The woman who he knew as his older sister was actually his mother.

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