The Two-Way
8:03 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Recently Returned From Africa, Doctor Tests Positive For Ebola At NYC Hospital

Police officers stand outside the home of Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, on Thursday in New York. Spencer tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 10:05 pm

A patient at a New York City hospital has tested positive for Ebola, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a press conference on Thursday.

According to a statement from Doctors Without Borders, a doctor returned to the United States Oct. 12 after working with Ebola patients in Guinea.

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The Two-Way
7:41 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Criticized Over Missing Mexican Students, Governor Of Guerrero Will Step Down

After the kidnapping and disappearance of dozens of students in his state of Guerrero, Gov. Angel Aguirre announced he would step down on Thursday.
Jesus Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 10:16 pm

The governor of the Mexican state of Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped and disappeared last month, says he will leave office.

Angel Aguirre had been under growing pressure to step down as the investigation of the student's disappearance dragged on.

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

EU Leaders Agree To Cut Emissions By At Least 40 Percent

European Union leaders announced on Thursday that they had agreed to cut emissions by at least 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030.

Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European Council, made the announcement on Twitter, saying the agreement marked the "world's most ambitious, cost effective, fair climate energy policy."

The AP reports:

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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Deaths At US-Mexico Border Reach 15-Year Low

An unidentified U.S. Border Patrol agent, left, helps an immigrant, including setting up intravenous fluid replacement for dehydration, near Sells, Ariz. on June 25.
Astrid Galvan AP

The number of people who have died crossing the US-Mexico border has hit a 15-year low. The Associated Press reports:

"...more immigrants turned themselves in to authorities in Texas and fewer took their chances with the dangerous trek across the Arizona desert.

The U.S. government recorded 307 deaths in the 2014 fiscal year that ended in September - the lowest number since 1999. In 2013, the number of deaths was 445."

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It's All Politics
4:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Meet The Hero Dogs Of The Secret Service

Jordan, one of the dogs being hailed as a hero for attacking a White House fence-jumper Wednesday night.
Courtesy of the Secret Service

Hurricane "enjoys playing with his Kong toy." Jordan is partial to walks around the White House. Both have brown eyes and, according to tweets from the Secret Service, are "ready to work." Meet the hero dogs, who helped take down the latest man to jump the fence at the White House.

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All Tech Considered
4:26 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:57 pm

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Second White House Fence Jumper Had Been Arrested Before

A Secret Service police officer walks outside the White House in Washington on Thursday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:59 pm

The man who jumped the White House fence on Wednesday night has been charged with unlawful entry of the White House grounds and harming animals used in law enforcement.

According to officials, Dominic Adesanya kicked and punched two Secret Service dogs. NPR's Tamara Keith filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The dogs, Hurricane and Jordan, helped stop the fence jumper in his tracks on the White House lawn.

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Around the Nation
4:13 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:43 pm

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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The Salt
4:13 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How 'Foodies' Were Duped Into Thinking McDonald's Was High-End Food

McDonald's Organic/youtube

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:13 pm

We all know that how a food is packaged and marketed can influence our choices, no matter how hard we try to shake the effect. Haven't you ever found yourself contemplating a row of wines, trying to decide which bottle to buy, and then opting for the one with the higher price tag, the prettier label or the more tempting descriptors?

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Law
3:29 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county.
David Adame AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:15 pm

Miami-Dade County's sex offender residency restrictions — some of the tightest in the country — drew national attention a few years ago when an encampment of sex offenders sprang up on a causeway in Biscayne Bay. After a public outcry, local and state authorities evicted several dozen people, mostly men, from that makeshift settlement.

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