Politics

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As of Friday, the number of Republican presidential candidates stands at 10 and counting. It's a number that's certain to grow in the coming weeks with the expected official entrances of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and, yes, even Donald Trump.

It's the early presidential campaign season, and candidates are loudly courting voters in high-profile appearances nationwide. But in quiet, closed-press fundraisers, they're also asking well-heeled elites for the cash to keep campaigning. That cash grab is so fast-paced, it would make even hot Silicon Valley startups jealous.

The latest name to make serious noise about a 2016 White House bid is the Republican governor of a state long been considered a key to GOP chances of winning the presidency — Ohio.

It's a political disease that is striking some presidential hopefuls early in this campaign season: foot-in-mouth syndrome. It's one they were hoping to avoid, but just this week, a handful of GOP candidates have fallen victim:

The Key To Comedy Is Timing

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Talk about your hawkish view - a red-tailed hawk has decided to hang out high up on some prime real estate here in Washington.

TAMARA DICKINSON: It's been spotted all over the grounds. It's been spotted several times on the White House itself.

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This post was updated at 5:20 p.m. E.T.

Hillary Clinton called for universal, automatic voter registration Thursday, saying "every young man or young woman should be automatically registered to vote when they turn 18" unless they choose to opt out.

She also called on all states to offer at least 20 days of early voting, to give as many people as possible a chance to cast ballots.

Speaking at Texas Southern University to receive a leadership award, Clinton blasted states, including Texas and Wisconsin that have reduced early voting in recent years.

In the race for the GOP presidential nomination, Rick Perry is getting in Thursday, and both Jeb Bush and Bobby Jindal have announced that they have announcements to make.

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

Rick Perry, the former governor of Texas and 2012 Republican candidate for president, formally announced a second bid for the White House.

At a rally in Addison, Texas, this afternoon, Perry told a group of supporters: "Today I am announcing that I'm running for the presidency of the United States of America."

He decried that "weakness at home has led to weakness abroad" and that "Our economy is barely growing."

The states that set up their own insurance marketplaces have nothing to lose in King v. Burwell, the big Supreme Court case that will be decided by the end of June. But that doesn't mean those states are breathing easy.

With varying degrees of difficulty, all of the state-based exchanges are struggling to figure out how to become financially self-sufficient as the spigot of federal start-up money shuts off.

Updated June 4 at 11:30 a.m. ET

Nobody expects an internship to make one rich — but for many, the entire experience has become simply unattainable.

Lincoln Chafee has been a Republican U.S. senator and an independent governor and now is taking a shot at the presidency, as a Democrat.

Chafee announced his bid in a speech in Arlington, Va., at George Mason University on Wednesday. In his speech, Chafee said, "I enjoy challenges, and certainly we have many facing America. Today I'm formally entering the race for the Democratic nomination for president."

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Diabetes is something nurse practitioner Martha Brinsko helps a lot of patients manage at the Charlotte Community Health Clinic in North Carolina.

"Most mornings when you check your sugar, what would you say kind of the average is?" Brinsko asks Diana Coble.

Coble hesitates before explaining she ran out of what she needs to check it, and she didn't have the gas money to get back here sooner. Brinsko says Coble can get what she needs at the clinic.

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President Obama said Wednesday that China could be open to eventually joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the massive trade deal the White House is hoping to get through Congress.

"They've already started putting out feelers about the possibilities of them participating at some point," the president told Kai Ryssdal of "Marketplace" from American Public Media.

Would a permanent inspector general at the U.S. State Department have flagged then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's use of a private account for her e-mails? That was one of the questions raised at a Senate panel hearing on the lack of permanent inspectors general in the Obama administration.

It's been just two months since the Justice Department indicted Sen. Robert Menendez on bribery and conspiracy charges. But lawyers in the case already seem to be, well, getting under each other's skin.

This post was updated at 5:45 p.m. E.T.

Although not nearly so crowded as its Republican counterpart, the Democratic field of presidential contenders is growing. On Wednesday, Lincoln Chafee, a former senator and governor of Rhode Island, became the fourth major politician to enter the White House chase as a Democrat.

A New York Times-CBS News poll offers compelling new numbers measuring Americans' attitudes toward the rising tide of political money.

Just one question: Which numbers should you believe?

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