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Long-time civil rights advocate Mary Frances Berry says while taking down this flag has symbolic power, much more needs to be done. And she joins us now from Washington, D.C. Welcome to the show.

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On the day when Nikki Haley, South Carolina's governor, proclaimed it "a new day in South Carolina" and signed into law the removal of the Confederate battle flag from Statehouse grounds, one Democratic presidential candidate sought to clarify his stance on the flag's place in American history.

Jim Webb, the former senator and current presidential candidate, provided a nuanced answer to whether he was glad to see the flag gone during an interview with CBS Thursday.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Army confirmed Thursday that it will cut 40,000 troops at several domestic bases over the next two years in a cost-saving move. If the White House and Congress are unable to avert another round of sequestration cuts, the troop reductions could be even deeper, according to Army officials.

FBI Director James Comey said authorities have arrested "more than 10 people" over the past four weeks who have been radicalized through slick electronic recruitment efforts tied to the self-proclaimed Islamic state.

"We arrested them to try to thwart what they were up to," the FBI director said in a briefing with reporters Thursday in his Washington conference room.

"I do believe our work disrupted efforts to kill people, likely related to the Fourth of July," Comey added.

"Pics or it didn't happen" is a common refrain these days. You can't just experience life. You have to document it. And so, when fans line up to shake hands with a presidential candidate, that handshake often really isn't enough. It's all about the selfie — a self-portrait shot from a cellphone. And candidates are being deluged with selfie seekers on the trail.

Selfies are "a part of American culture" and, for candidates, taking them has to be part of a broader digital campaign strategy, said Brian Donahue, founder and CEO of Craft Media Digital, a political communications firm.

The Obama administration's nominee to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff warns that Russia is the biggest threat to American interests and describes Moscow's recent geopolitical moves as "nothing short of alarming."

Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr., speaking at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, said: "Russia presents the greatest threat to our national security. ... If you look at their behavior, it's nothing short of alarming."

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Today in South Carolina, Gov. Nikki Haley signed into law the bill that removes the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds.

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Now we bring you the story of an investigation. Cue the "Magnum, P.I." music...

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MCEVERS: ...Because yes, this involves the famously mustachioed star of the '80s series, Tom Selleck.

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The debate over South Carolina's flying of the Confederate flag touched many emotions and motivations in more than 12 hours of debate, with several Democrats urging its removal and several Republicans urging its persistence.

The bill to remove the flag from its prominent place flying outside the Capitol was finally passed without any changes, in the wee hours of Thursday morning.

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Greece's prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, went before the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, today. He said he wants a fair and viable solution to his country's debt crisis. The atmosphere in the chamber was heated.

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Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore's African-American state's attorney, took the spotlight earlier this year when she filed charges against six police officers in her own city. The officers were charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, an African-American man who died while in custody.

It was a powerful image to some Baltimore residents — an African-American woman who said she heard where the city's protesters were coming from, but also that she came from a family of police officers and needed the public to let her do her job.

Former Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore told the Richmond Times-Dispatch he's in and plans to make an official announcement the first week in August.

This campaign season, it was Donald Trump playing "Rockin' in the Free World" at his presidential announcement. Singer Neil Young was not happy.

But before Trump, there was "Dole Man," "Sarah Barracuda" and many other attempts by candidates to use popular songs, only to make musicians mad.

This story was first published by Vermont Public Radio.

Sen. Bernie Sanders spends a lot of time on the presidential campaign trail talking about the plight of the middle class and the prodigality of the "one percent."

Meanwhile, Sanders and his wife, Jane, were likely in about the top 5 percent of American income earners last year, according to copies of their 2014 tax returns obtained by Vermont Public Radio.

Hillary Clinton's campaign is telegraphing that it is "worried" about an insurgent Bernie Sanders. But should it be?

"We are worried about him, sure," Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri said Monday on MSNBC's Morning Joe. "He will be a serious force for the campaign, and I don't think that will diminish."

Former Virginia Governor Jim Gilmore is the latest candidate to enter the 2016 presidential race — he told the Richmond Times-Dispatch Tuesday that he plans to make a formal announcement in August.

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