KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Politics

Political news

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

(Laughter). We're joined onstage now by our very own Debbie Elliott, NPR's Southern correspondent...

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, BYLINE: Hello.

SIMON: ...And John Archibald is a columnist here at al.com.

JOHN ARCHIBALD: Hey.

(APPLAUSE)

What's Ahead In U.K. Politics

Jun 10, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

One of the biggest political gambles in British history has apparently failed. British Prime Minister Theresa May has formed a new minority government after she failed to win a majority in this week's general election.

Colstrip, Mont., is about 750 miles away from Seattle, as the crow flies. Politically, the two places may be even further apart. And yet, they're connected.

If you're turning the lights on in the Pacific Northwest, some of that electricity may be coming from Colstrip. And if you're in Colstrip, wondering how long your own lights will stay on, you're likely looking west.

All we want are the facts, ma'am.

During his congressional testimony Thursday, James Comey played his best Sgt. Joe Friday, the protagonist of the 1950s Dragnet TV series known for that signature line.

Asked whether he thought President Trump obstructed justice, Comey, the fired FBI director, declined to give his opinion.

"I don't know," Comey said. "That — that's Bob Mueller's job to sort that out."

Saturday's nationwide "March Against Sharia," sponsored by a group known for aggressively criticizing Islam, has in recent days become a rallying cause for right-wing extremists, forcing march organizers to repudiate some of their own supporters and prompting concern about clashes with militant leftists.

A nonprofit group's claim that President Trump is violating the Emoluments Clause of the U.S. Constitution should be dismissed because the plaintiffs have no standing to sue, according to a court filing by the Department of Justice.

"Those claims falter on threshold grounds: no Plaintiff has alleged an injury" that meets the standing requirement, the DOJ says in a document submitted in federal court.

As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson tries to heal a deep rift among Arab partners, President Trump seems to be upping the ante. Trump says he consulted with Saudi Arabia and others on a recent trip to Riyadh and decided to call out Qatar for its "very high level" of terror financing.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to look now at the significance of one of James Comey's big revelations yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, for more on the week in politics, we're going to turn to our Friday commentators. Guy Benson, the political editor of townhall.com, welcome to the studio.

GUY BENSON: Hello.

Catalonia will hold a referendum on October 1 on whether to leave Spain, the head of the region announced Friday.

"The question will be: 'Do you want Catalonia to become an independent state in the form of a republic'," said Carles Puigdemont, the head of the regional government, Reuters reports.

But the Spanish government said the vote will not happen.

The Trump White House had been considering Robert Mueller as a top candidate to lead the FBI before the deputy U.S. attorney general changed course and tapped Mueller to serve as special counsel investigating Russian interference in last year's election, two sources familiar with the process told NPR.

President Trump said Friday he would be willing to testify under oath about his interactions with former FBI Director James Comey, whom he fired in May.

The president said Comey's testimony on Thursday before the Senate Intelligence Committee mostly vindicated his previous claims about their interactions.

Friday News Roundup - International

Jun 9, 2017

The Islamic State says it was behind attacks in Iran, after attacking London. President Trump picks a fight with London’s mayor just before Britain’s snap election. And Qatar’s neighbors in the Gulf turn unexpectedly hostile.

These and more of the week’s top international news stories are on the Friday News Roundup.

GUESTS

Andrew Taylor, Professor of political science, North Carolina State University

Bruce Lawrence, Author, “The Koran in English: A Biography”; professor emeritus of Religion, Duke University

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jun 9, 2017

The testimony of fired FBI Director James Comey to the Senate Intelligence Committee dominated the news this week, even before it happened.

Some cities had watch parties. Plenty of others went on with life as normal. And Washington held its breath.

The consequences of Comey — part of this week’s Friday News Roundup in front of a live audience in Chapel Hill, N.C.

GUESTS

Updated on June 10 at 7:32 p.m. ET

So now that former FBI Director James Comey has appeared before a Senate committee and accused the White House of lying about his firing — and, in the process, raised significant questions about obstruction of justice — what happens next?

A lot.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

David Greene is on the line from Moscow. David, are people saying just the same thing there?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Updated at 11:05 a.m. ET

Ordinary people often get into legal trouble in response to desperate circumstances. Politicians, however, seem to make the worst trouble for themselves when they are riding high and carrying all before them.

Thus the most famous political scandals of U.S. history have happened not when presidents or members of Congress had their backs to the wall but when their sails were filled with a favorable wind.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

While former FBI director James Comey was testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee Thursday, several hundred attendees from across the country listened to President Trump share the administration's religious agenda. The luncheon headlined by Trump was the kick-off event of the Faith and Freedom Coalition's 2017 Road to Majority gathering taking place in Washington, D.C., over three days.

Updated at 7:28 p.m. ET

Former FBI director James Comey may have done more damage to Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday than even President Trump, whom Comey publicly accused of waving him off part of the Russia investigation.

Comey said he expected Sessions to recuse himself from the Russia investigation weeks before he did because of reasons that are classified. That does not comport with Sessions rationale when he announced his recusal in early March.

House Republicans voted Thursday to deliver on their promise to repeal Dodd-Frank — the massive set of Wall Street regulations President Barack Obama signed into law after the 2008 financial crisis.

In a near party-line vote, the House approved a bill, dubbed the Financial Choice Act, which scales back or eliminates many of the post-crisis banking rules.

The legislation is the brainchild of House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas.

Pages