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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump addressed the annual evangelical gathering known as the Values Voter Summit Friday in Washington, where in promised in part to give churches "their voices back."

The bombastic, at times crude, thrice-married GOP standard bearer does not exactly fit the mold of a nominee that religious conservatives typically champion.

The Camp of the Sacred Stone is full of all manner of people — kids, elders, lawyers, laid-back hippies, and representatives of several Native American tribes — all gathered alongside the Standing Rock Sioux Nation to resist construction of a controversial oil pipeline that would cut across the American heartland.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, the Republican candidate for vice president, did something his running mate, Donald Trump, declines to do. He released his tax returns dating back 10 years.

This week on the campaign trail, Donald Trump and his surrogates are being haunted by the ghost of comments past.

Specifically, allegations the Republican presidential nominee made five years ago that President Obama lied about his birthplace to make him eligible for the presidency. (Obama was born in Hawaii.)

It's a theory that those close to Trump — who was one of the most well-known "birthers" — have tried to distance from the candidate.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

With barely two months until Election Day, the NPR Politics team returns with its weekly roundup of political news. They discuss the tightening of the presidential race, NBC's "Commander-in-Chief" forum from earlier this week, and answer some listener questions.

On the podcast:

  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders
  • White House Correspondent Tamara Keith
  • Campaign Reporter Scott Detrow
  • Editor and Correspondent Ron Elving

Donald Trump's praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin is again stirring up controversy after he gave an interview Thursday to state-funded Russian Television.

Trump talked to former CNN host Larry King, who now hosts a show on RT America, for about 10 minutes. The Republican candidate again cast doubt on whether Russia was behind the hacking of the Democratic National Committee, a belief at odds with U.S. intelligence officials.

That's also despite having encouraged Russia to "find" Clinton's emails just six weeks ago.

Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Washington, D.C., New York City and Pennsylvania. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have made Sept. 11 a recurring theme in their campaigns, but both say they will stay off the campaign trail that day and will not visit the Ground Zero site in New York City.

Here, a look at current players in the political landscape and where they were in their political careers on Sept. 11, 2001.

The Supreme Court on Friday temporarily invalidated Michigan's new ban on straight-ticket voting. The court let stand lower court rulings that blocked the ban from going into effect.

The straight-ticket option allows voters to cast their ballots for all candidates of one party with a single mark.

Last January, the Republican-controlled Legislature in Michigan voted to ban the straight-ticket option, which was first enacted 125 years ago and is popular particularly among black urban voters as well as in some heavily Republican areas.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump raised $90 million in August, the campaign said Thursday.

That's a "record" haul for the Trump campaign and its joint fundraising committees, the campaign bragged in a Thursday statement, but it's no match for Hillary Clinton, who raised $143 million in August, as her campaign reported last week.

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell used a personal computer connected to a private telephone line to send and receive emails to staffers, friends and foreign leaders without having to go through State Department servers.

Powell shared that experience with Hillary Clinton two days after she took over as secretary of state. Powell cautioned Clinton to "be very careful," lest her emails be discovered and become part of the official State Department record.

In story posted on the popular Facebook page Humans of New York, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton likened perceptions that she is "cold" or "unemotional" to having to learn to control her emotions as a young woman.

Clinton recounted taking a law school admissions test and having a group of men taunt the women. According to Clinton, they yelled things like "You don't need to be here" and "there's plenty else you can do."

"One of them even said: 'If you take my spot, I'll get drafted, and I'll go to Vietnam, and I'll die,'" the post reads.

Donald Trump would have "a very good relationship with many foreign leaders," he said Wednesday at NBC's candidate forum, including Russian President Vladimir Putin. That's important, he said, because better ties with Moscow would let the U.S. and Russia work together to fight the Islamic State.

The Claim

"And, you know, the beautiful part of getting along?" Trump asked. "Russia wants to defeat ISIS as badly as we do."

The Question

Is it true that Russia "wants to defeat ISIS" as badly as the U.S. does?

You've heard it a bajillion times at this point: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are the two most unpopular major party presidential candidates on record. Both of them have unfavorability ratings of more than 50 percent.

But here's one more place that unpopularity pops up: the number of people who simply don't choose either candidate. Especially when you compare this election with 2012, a massive number of people are either choosing third-party candidates or simply have not yet decided.

President Obama repeated his argument that Donald Trump is not qualified to be president.

He urged both voters and journalists to pay careful attention to what he called Trump's "uninformed or outright wacky ideas," and not to grade the Republican White House nominee "on a curve."

"Somehow behavior that in normal times we would consider completely unacceptable and outrageous becomes normalized" during an election campaign, Obama said Thursday at the conclusion of a southeast Asian summit meeting in Laos.

Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson asked a television interviewer today, "What is Aleppo?" betraying a lack of interest or even superficial knowledge of the civil war in Syria that's been raging for more than five years.

The question came during an interview on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." Panelist Mike Barnicle asked the two-time libertarian nominee and former governor of New Mexico, "What would you do if you were elected, about Aleppo?"

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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