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Of the nearly 3,000 migrant minors who were separated from their parents and placed in federal custody, the Trump administration says at least 102 are under 5 years old. And for several weeks, administration officials have been under a court-ordered deadline: Reunite those young children with their parents, and do it quickly.

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Justice Stephen Breyer On A Changing Court

Jul 9, 2018

Justice Stephen Breyer is the 108th person to sit on the Supreme Court. Soon he will welcome the 114th, as President Donald Trump nominates a successor to Justice Anthony Kennedy.

President Trump is expected to make the most of this opportunity to cement a conservative legacy, one that will be felt long after his presidency. With so much commentary and debate expected to surround the Supreme Court in the weeks and months ahead, we present a view from inside, courtesy of Justice Breyer.

The last thing Washington needs right now is another blockbuster news story.

But here it comes anyway, President Trump's latest choice to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. At a minimum, that person will be the center of attention in Washington through much of the summer and fall, through Senate hearings and deliberations — after which the nominee is highly likely to be confirmed and to serve on the nation's highest court for decades.

When it comes to Washington news stories, it doesn't get much bigger than that.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

With just hours to go before the official announcement, President Trump has made a decision on his pick for the next Supreme Court justice, a source close to the decision-making process tells NPR's Mara Liasson.

But there is still no indication which of the four finalists it will be.

As of Monday morning, Trump was still deciding among Judges Thomas Hardiman, Brett Kavanaugh, Raymond Kethledge and Amy Coney Barrett.

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Morning News Brief

Jul 9, 2018

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We know President Trump has a flair for the dramatic. And there are few decisions as consequential and thus as dramatic as a Supreme Court nominee.

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NATO leaders are hoping their summit in Brussels this week will not suffer the same fate as last month's Group of 7 meeting, which unraveled over trade disputes with President Trump.

"They are still licking their wounds from what happened at the G-7," said Julie Smith, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security. "They're looking for an opportunity to kind of put forward a counter-narrative that the trans-Atlantic partners are united."

But with tensions still running high between the U.S. and its allies, unity may be hard to come by.

It started with a rolled ankle during a routine training exercise.

Shannon Hubbard never imagined it was the prologue to one of the most debilitating pain conditions known to exist, called ­­­­­­­complex regional pain syndrome.

It's a condition that causes the nervous system to go haywire, creating pain disproportionate to the actual injury. It can also affect how the body regulates temperature and blood flow.

The Trump administration said Saturday that it is temporarily halting billions of dollars of payments designed to help insurers meet the Affordable Care Act requirement that they provide coverage regardless of whether a person is healthy or sick.

President Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani said Sunday that the president's former lawyer, Michael Cohen, "should cooperate" with prosecutors, and that if he tells the truth, Trump has nothing to worry about.

Giuliani made the television rounds Sunday morning, appearing on three different programs, as speculation grew louder last week that Cohen was inching closer to criminal charges and possibly working out a deal with prosecutors.

"Michael Cohen should cooperate with the government," Giuliani said on ABC's This Week.

People have asked Janelle Bynum whether legislation would help solve the problem of police being called on black people for just going about their daily lives. Bynum, an Oregon state representative who herself had authorities called on her while canvassing for votes earlier this month, simply tells them, "You can't legislate humanity."

His name is Johan.

He drank a bottle of milk and played with a purple ball as he waited for the immigration judge, The Associated Press reported.

John W. Richardson, the judge at the Phoenix courthouse, said he was "embarrassed to ask" if the defendant understood the proceedings. "I don't know who you would explain it to, unless you think that a 1-year-old could learn immigration law," he told Johan's attorney.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

The final hours of President Trump's decision-making on his second Supreme Court nominee are being described as hectic and unpredictable — and the president has still not made a decision.

"It's insane" over there, said a source close to the process. Few have had any sleep in Bedminster, N.J., as deliberations continue over the pros and cons of the potential nominees, and no one is sure which way the president is going to go, the source said.

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Deep underground, in a network of caves, a mission is underway in Thailand to save the lives of a group of boys and their soccer coach. We're following that story, and we will bring you updates throughout the morning.

Mike Davis didn't think Donald Trump could get elected.

Davis is the kind of Republican who backed Ohio governor John Kasich in the 2016 primaries, the kind of Republican who subscribes to the Wall Street Journal. Davis, 64, is the former mayor of Dunwoody, Ga., a small city in the state's 6th Congressional District, one of the most highly-educated districts in the country.

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Sandra Lopez hasn't left the house for eight months. If she does, she could be deported.

People come to her instead; the English tutor might stop by one day, the yoga instructor the next. Lopez says these visits are welcome distractions from the boredom that comes with being in sanctuary.

"When you enter sanctuary, you know the date, the hour, the minute, but you don't know when you're going to leave," says Lopez, who's originally from Mexico. "It could be months. It could be years."

Updated at 9:26 a.m. ET Monday

A man almost ran over a campaign volunteer with his car after threatening to kill supporters of President Trump and Rep. Lee Zeldin at the New York Republican congressman's campaign headquarters on Long Island on Friday, police said.

Lots of controversial cases at the intersection of religion and the law wind up before the Supreme Court.

And, for most of U.S. history, the court, like the country, was dominated by Protestant Christians. But today, it is predominantly Catholic and Jewish.

It has become more conservative and is about to get even more so with President Trump's expected pick to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is stepping down from the court at the end of July.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo finished two days of talks with senior North Korean officials in Pyongyang on Saturday, telling reporters that the two countries agreed to continue discussions on denuclearization and the repatriation of the remains of Americans killed during the Korean War.

The talks came amid growing concern among nuclear experts that North Korea is not taking steps toward denuclearization and uncertainty as to what President Trump and Kim Jong Un meant when they committed to it in Singapore last month.

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Scott Pruitt was head of the Environmental Protection Agency for 16 months. And during his short tenure, he became entangled in a number of government ethics rules, which now start to look a little bit ragged. NPR's Peter Overby reports.

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President Trump is in New Jersey where he'll be thinking over his pick for the Supreme Court. We'll get to that and the week's other big political developments. We're joined now by NPR's Ron Elving. Good morning, Ron.

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Who's In The Running For Kennedy's Seat

Jul 7, 2018

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Pruitt's Impact On The EPA

Jul 7, 2018

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