Politics

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Businesses and unions often disagree on public policy. But after the Supreme Court's tie vote on immigration Thursday, company executives and labor leaders united to call on Congress to settle the issue.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A campaign putting out a list of big name endorsements isn't particularly remarkable. But what is remarkable about the Clinton campaign's list is that it includes prominent Republican executives — business leaders who say they have never voted for a Democratic presidential candidate in their lives.

Take Jim Cicconi, the senior executive vice president at AT&T. He served in both the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations and donated $10,000 last year to Jeb Bush's Right to Rise superPAC. But he says he's voting for Hillary Clinton in November.

Five years ago, the residents of a southern Chinese village drew the world's attention when they chased Communist Party officials out of their hamlet and elected a new leader.

Now, the land disputes that spurred them to action remain unresolved, and the residents of Wukan village are rising up in protest once again after their elected leader was detained on corruption charges Saturday.

Updated at 1:15 p.m.

House Democrats have ended their almost 26-hour-long sit-in to push for gun control legislation, pledging on Thursday afternoon to continue their fight once Congress returns from the July Fourth recess.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., ended the daylong protest surrounded by his Democratic colleagues. The civil rights leader proclaimed that this "is a struggle, but we're going to win this struggle."

The protest that played out Wednesday on Capitol Hill wasn't quite plebiscite by Periscope. But it came close.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The View From Jersey City, N.J.

Jun 23, 2016
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The NPR Politics team is back with an episode on gun laws and why, in recent American history, they never seem to change. The team discusses the four gun proposals that were rejected by the Senate this week, as well as a possible compromise bill that is in the works and the power of the NRA.

On the podcast:

  • Congressional reporter Susan Davis
  • Editor and correspondent Ron Elving
  • Campaign reporter Sam Sanders
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump laid out a series of campaign promises and leveled a slew of accusations at rival Hillary Clinton Wednesday. Read more about the speech here.

NPR's politics team (with some help from our colleagues on the international desk) has annotated Trump's speech, below. Portions we commented on are bolded, followed by analysis and fact check in italics. We will update further.

Donald Trump did what Republicans have begged their presidential candidate to do for months — lay out the case, from A to Z, against Hillary Clinton.

During a speech in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton launched a major attack on the economic record of her Republican rival, Donald Trump.

The speech went over some by-now familiar ground about Trump's business record, as well as his controversial positions on issues such as government debt and the minimum wage.

And at one point, Clinton took on Trump's views about women in the workforce.

Report: Partisan Bad Blood Highest In Decades

Jun 22, 2016

This election has been ugly.

Outside a Donald Trump rally a few weeks ago in New Mexico, anti-Trump protesters threw plastic bottles and burning t-shirts at police.

Donald J. Trump, the Republicans' presumptive nominee for the White House, attacked his primary rival Hillary Clinton on Wednesday as "a world-class liar" who allegedly used her government power to pad her bank account and reward special interests.

"Hillary Clinton may be the most corrupt person ever to seek the presidency," Trump declared in a speech from New York, as he sought to change the subject after a string of bad news about his campaign's fundraising prowess and personnel moves by pointing the finger at Clinton's long record.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has changed his mind and will indeed run for re-election to the U.S. Senate.

It's a big departure for the former presidential candidate, who had repeatedly maintained that there was no "Plan B" if his campaign for the presidency did not work out. Even after withdrawing from the White House contest in March, Rubio continued to insist he was not going to run again and even mocked such insinuations that he would reverse course.

But on Wednesday, Rubio did just that. In a statement, he admitted it was a puzzling turn of course.

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