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The House Intelligence Committee's investigation into the Trump campaign's potential connections to Russia's election meddling isn't dead — but it's not exactly dancing a jig, either.

No rest for the weary in our weekly roundup of national education news.

Supreme Court rules on special education case

"I'm thrilled," said Amanda Morin, a parent and advocate with the web site Understood.org, after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously in a case that could affect 6.5 million special education students. "Now I can actually go into a school system and say 'The Supreme Court has said, based on my child's abilities, he is legally entitled to make progress.'"

The negotiator-in-chief couldn't seal the deal.

President Trump, the former businessman who has never been shy about touting his negotiating skills, has for several weeks been involved in a high-profile negotiation and persuasion effort with members of his own party in an effort to pass the American Health Care Act.

That effort failed.

But this is how Trump sold himself.

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And now we're back with NPR's congressional correspondent, Sue Davis. Hi there again.

SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: Hey there.

MCEVERS: And we have White House correspondent Scott Horsley also. Hi, Scott.

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And we have Congressman Bradley Byrne of Alabama. He actually supported this bill. Welcome, Congressman.

BRADLEY BYRNE: It's good to be back on the program.

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In the coming days, there will be lots of digging into what brought down the Republican health care bill. Here's what House Speaker Paul Ryan had to say just after the vote was called off.

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In a series of memorandums sent to U.S. embassies, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has offered a glimpse of what President Trump's promised "extreme vetting" will mean for visa applicants when put into practice.

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Right. Congressman Mike Kelly is a Republican from Pennsylvania. He had supported the Republican health care bill. He joins us now. Welcome to the program, Congressman.

MIKE KELLY: Thank you, Audie. Thanks for having me.

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The big story at this hour - President Trump has told Congress not to vote on Republicans' long-awaited replacement for the Affordable Care Act also known as Obamacare. Let's go first to NPR's Susan Davis who is at the Capitol. Hey there, Sue.

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We are back with NPR congressional correspondent Sue Davis, who's still on the line. Hey there again.

SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: Hey, Kelly.

MCEVERS: And we also have White House correspondent Scott Horsley, too. Hi there, Scott.

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I'm Audie Cornish in Washington where Republicans were not able to rally enough of their own members to vote for a replacement to the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare.

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The House was supposed to vote this afternoon on the Republican bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. But instead, at the president's urging, House Speaker Paul Ryan abruptly pulled the bill. Ryan described it this way.

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Updated at 5 p.m. ET

House Republicans scrapped a vote on their health care replacement plan on Friday after defections from both the right and center that made it clear the bill would not pass.

"Obamacare is the law of the land. It is going to remain the law of the land," House Speaker Paul Ryan admitted shortly after he pulled the bill. "We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future. I don't know how long it's going to take us to replace this law."

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Throughout the campaign, President Trump billed himself as a master negotiator who would make the "best deals" for the American people.

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What a day it was yesterday on Capitol Hill. House Republicans delayed a vote on their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Here's Speaker of the House Paul Ryan.

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You're going to hear a lot of this kind of wordplay today. The Republican health care plan is on life support...

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President Trump has been urging voters to pressure Congress to pass a replacement to the Affordable Care Act. He spoke in a video message.

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And to help us understand what's happening on Capitol Hill tonight, I am joined by NPR's Ron Elving. Hello there, Ron.

RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Kelly.

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Updated at 11 a.m. ET Friday

The U.S. State Department has signed and issued a presidential permit to construct the Keystone XL pipeline. That reverses former President Barack Obama's 2015 decision to reject the controversial pipeline.

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