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Federal authorities have charged nine people in connection with an elaborate trading scheme involving hackers from Ukraine and securities traders in the U.S. that generated more than $30 million in illegal profits.

The federal indictments, unsealed today in New York and New Jersey, allege that hackers broke into three news wire companies to get early access to more than 150,000 confidential press releases — such as merger-and-acquisition announcements. This allowed the schemers to make trades on them before the deals became public.

For the past nine years, some of America's biggest producers of fresh salad greens and vegetables have been waging a quiet war on wildlife surrounding their fields, all in an effort to keep your veggies free of contamination from disease-causing bacteria.

Now, a fresh analysis of safety data suggests that the effort is mostly in vain. Clearing away wildlife habitat does not make food any safer.

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Nick Symmonds, an American middistance runner, won't be competing in the world championships in Beijing this month.

Symmonds, who is a U.S. National champion and has competed in the Olympic Games, failed to sign a terms and conditions agreement with USA Track & Field that is necessary to be part of the team. He has a personal sponsorship deal with Brooks Running, while the American world championships team is sponsored by Nike.

On Monday, Google CEO Larry Page announced the formation of a new parent company for Google called Alphabet. Page describes Alphabet as a collection of companies including Google, Life Sciences (which focuses on medicine and health issues), and Calico (a company that claims to tackle aging), among others.

Last Tuesday, Netflix announced it would begin offering employees who are new parents unlimited paid leave for a year, allowing them to take off as much time as they want during the first 12 months after a child's birth or adoption.

The news drew praise from people who said it would be good for working parents, and would help America catch up to most other developed nations, where paid time off for a new child is mandatory.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Google is restructuring. In a blog post today, CEO Larry Page announced a new firm called Alphabet. Alphabet will become the parent company atop all of Google's many ventures. NPR tech reporter Aarti Shahani joins us now to explain. Hi, Aarti.

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New Greek Bailout Deal Looms

Aug 10, 2015

Negotiations between Greece and its creditors dragged on overnight as the parties work to reach an agreement that would save the bankrupt country from another loan default. The deal would funnel up to 86 billion euros ($94 billion) to Athens, allowing the Greek government to make a 3.4 billion euro payment to the European Central Bank by the Aug. 20 deadline.

Given Russia's cyber skills, it's not surprising that a Russian entrepreneur, Eugene Kaspersky, runs one of the world's leading companies offering protection from malware and online crime.

But with the current tensions between Russia and the West, Kaspersky's ties to the Russian government have raised questions.

There's a line in the 2007 movie Die Hard 4: Live Free Or Die, when in the midst of a wave of cyberterrorism, the villain warns "you have no idea who you're dealing with."

Why The Nation's Rental Market Is Exploding

Aug 10, 2015
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In Music City, Rents Keep Going Up And Up

Aug 10, 2015
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In the years before the Great Recession, many Americans piled up too much credit card debt. Now, they seem to be a little wiser about using their plastic. But it can be tough staying disciplined while taking the kids for back-to-school shopping.

The Great Recession has taught Americans a valuable lesson, according to the country's top consumer watchdog.

Music icon Prince is worried about the future of the music business for artists, and his top priority can be summed up in one word: Freedom.

"Record contracts are just like — I'm gonna say the word – slavery," Prince told a group of 10 journalists Saturday night, during a meet and greet at his Paisley Park Studios in Minneapolis. "I would tell any young artist ... don't sign."

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Labor Department's July jobs report, released Friday, showed employers added 215,000 workers and that the unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.3 percent.

So how would you interpret that report if you were a policymaker for the nation's central bank?

It really — really — matters how you read those numbers, because you have a huge decision to make in September. You and the other Federal Reserve Board policymakers have to set the direction for interest rates.

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added 215,000 jobs last month, just shy of the number forecast by economists. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 5.3 percent.

Wages were up slightly, and the number of long-term unemployed remained the same as June.

Until recently, nurses at Los Angeles County Harbor-UCLA Hospital had to maneuver through a maze of wheelchairs, beds, boxes and lights to find surgical supplies in the equipment closet for the operating rooms.

But as public hospitals like Harbor-UCLA try to cut costs and make patients happier, administrators have turned to an unlikely ally: Toyota.

An online food service offered a special promotion during last night's Republican debate: A free taco for every time Donald Trump said "Mexico," which turned out to be a platterful.

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Not too long ago, a New York taxi medallion was worth more than a million dollars. Gene Friedman managed to buy more than 1,000. But that was before Uber, and now people like Friedman face bankruptcy.

Listen to the full story by Planet Money.

Businesses in Ferguson, Mo., are bracing as the city prepares for peaceful protests marking the first anniversary since it was embroiled in violence following the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Brown was unarmed when he was shot by a police officer on Aug. 9. In November, many businesses were looted, vandalized and set on fire after a grand jury decided to not indict Wilson. Since then businesses have been working to rebuild.

Netflix maintains a network of DVD distribution centers across the country. Workers there typically report for their shifts at 2:00 a.m. and according to job postings, the work in these centers can be physically demanding and repetitive. It involves lifting, sorting and inspecting thousands of DVDs for damage.

These employees are offered vastly different benefits than are their white-collar colleagues.

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The last defendant in the Bernard Madoff Ponzi scheme is going to jail three years after he pleaded guilty to helping conceal the massive fraud from regulators.

Irwin Lipkin, 77, will spend six months in prison for his role in the scheme that defrauded investors of billions of dollars in investments.

Texts, instant messages, video calls, Snapchats, Facebook messages, direct tweets or Instagrams — with so many ways to communicate electronically, one would think that all the variations have been exhausted. And yet, developers keep hitting us with more.

Yahoo just launched a new video messenger app called Livetext, which allows users to send videos with one catch: There's no sound.

It's like if FaceTime had a baby with Charlie Chaplin and Snapchat.

Brenda Hummel's 7-year-old daughter Andrea was born with severe epilepsy. Like many children with significant diseases or disabilities, she has health insurance through Medicaid. Hummel navigated Iowa's Medicaid resources for years to find just the right doctors and care for her daughter. But now Iowa's governor, Republican Terry Branstad, is moving full speed ahead with a plan to put private companies in charge of managing Medicaid's services, and that has Hummel worried.

Egypt has completed a major expansion of the Suez Canal after a furious year of construction, opening the new 22-mile cut in a third of the time that was initially forecast.

The $8.5 billion expansion allows two-way traffic and deepens and widens portions of the existing channels to accommodate larger vessels. Before the new construction, about 50 vessels a day transited the 146-year-old canal linking the Red Sea to the Mediterranean.

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