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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

This year, Social Security will not make enough money to cover its expenses--it will have to dip into its savings. That savings is slated to run out by 2034. As baby boomers retire, the Social Security equation is changing. Today on the show, we look at possible fixes.

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Passenger jets in the future will be lighter, more fuel-efficient and faster — partly because they won't have windows.

That's the prediction of Tim Clark, the president of Emirates airline. He says video screens that mimic windows through live camera feeds — as used in some Emirates first-class suites — are effective replacements for actual windows.

Say Goodbye To Some Paper Investment Reports

Jun 6, 2018

Investors and retirees who now get lengthy paper reports on how their mutual funds and other investment funds are doing will have to go online for the same updates. The new move by a Washington regulator is frustrating consumer watchdogs.

Facebook's longstanding agreements that led it to share users' data with device-makers included Chinese phone-maker Huawei – a company of which the U.S. government has long been suspicious, and which intelligence officials view as a security threat.

On Tuesday, Delaware became the first state to take advantage of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision and legalize full-scale sports betting — with the governor first in line to lay down money on a single game.

Gov. John Carney put $10 on the Phillies game that night — and it paid off. The Phillies beat the Cubs 6-1.

On May 14, the high court struck down a federal law that prevented states from legalizing sports gambling. The justices ruled that Congress can ban sports betting itself but said it can't mandate what state legislatures do or don't pass.

International House of Pancakes has created a stir by saying that after being IHOP for 60 years, it is "flippin' our name to IHOb" — setting off speculation over what that mysterious b could signify.

For now, the company isn't saying. IHOP promises to reveal the meaning on June 11.

But the Internet isn't big on waiting. Hungry for answers, people responded to the cryptic tweets: Could it be breakfast? Biscuits? Brunch? The improbable bancakes? Simply, and minimally, bacon? The on-trend bitcoin?

Chinese cellphone maker ZTE Corp. — the target of U.S. sanctions before President Trump ordered an abrupt about-face last month — has reportedly agreed to a preliminary deal to lift a U.S. Commerce Department ban on it buying from American suppliers.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

On a cold December night last year, a meeting was called in the lobby of my apartment building. Concerned residents gathered to discuss a matter of great import: what to do about the swarms of packages jamming the lobby closet and overflowing into the entryway.

Unclaimed boxes were an eyesore and a nuisance. Finding the right package was starting to require gymnastic ability. And the boxes kept coming, by the dozens, maybe hundreds. Most of them were from Amazon: brown, with a smile on the side.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Yesterday's primary election results in eight states helped to set the stage for November.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Senate Republicans worried about a possible trade war with U.S. allies Canada, Mexico and the European Union are pushing a plan to give Congress the final say over some trade actions.

A group led by Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker plans to unveil legislation this week to limit when President Trump, or any future president, could invoke national security as a reason for taxing foreign imports. It is a rare effort among congressional Republicans to use legislation to limit controversial policies embraced by Trump.

The U.S. economy has been humming along for the last few years, but its momentum can mask the financial fragility of millions of Americans adults. A survey by the Federal Reserve reveals just how precarious situation is for a surprising number of people — and how vulnerable they are to the regular ups and downs of the economic cycle.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Solo: A Trade Wars Story

Jun 5, 2018

President Donald Trump’s tariffs on aluminum and steel put a number of nations on edge.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the assertion that the tariffs are a response to national security threats is “insulting and unacceptable.”

The European Union has opened a World Trade Organization case.

David Koch, one half of the billionaire duo that built one of the nation's largest privately owned companies and one of its most controversial political networks, has announced his retirement from politics and business.

In a letter to Koch Industries employees written by his brother Charles Koch, the men announced that David was stepping down due to health concerns.

Recent years have been among the warmest on record, with a spike in record-high temperatures. Heat waves are also projected to become more frequent, more severe and longer.

NPR is working on a series of stories on what happens when people, animals and plants can't cool down. We would like to know how rising temperatures are affecting your life, business or community.

Updated at 9:14 a.m. ET

Mexico is putting tariffs on imports of U.S. steel and farm products — including pork, cheese, apples and potatoes — as it hits back at the U.S. for the Trump administration's tariffs on steel and aluminum products from Mexico, Canada and the European Union.

Signed by Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, the decree also suspends the country's preferential tariff treatment of the U.S. It was published in Mexico's official gazette on Tuesday.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We saw the start of a conference in Silicon Valley yesterday, a conference for Apple software developers. They lined up for hours until the doors opened.

Tim Cook, who has led Apple since 2011, spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep in a wide-ranging interview on Monday as the company kicked off its annual Worldwide Developers Conference.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Today NPR spoke directly with Apple CEO Tim Cook about the revelations that hardware makers had access to personal data in the Facebook app. NPR's Laura Sydell was there and joins us now. Hi, Laura.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: Hello.

"We've never been in the data business," Apple CEO Tim Cook told NPR on Monday, responding to a report that Facebook struck agreements giving Apple and other device makers access to Facebook users' personal information.

Information on users' relationship status, religion and political leaning is among the private data that became available under partnerships between Facebook and at least 60 device makers, The New York Times reported.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The man who built Starbucks into a worldwide empire is finally parting ways with his company. Howard Schultz is retiring, stepping down as the executive chairman of Starbucks. This means a new wave of speculation has started that he may be looking to get into politics.

Updated at 7:03 p.m. ET

Howard Schultz announced Monday he will be stepping down as Starbucks' executive chairman and member of the board of directors on June 26.

Vaccines are expensive to develop and it can take decades to get them to market. This means promising vaccines often sit in laboratory freezers during major epidemics. That is what happened during the 2014 Ebola outbreak, which killed more than 11,000 people. Today on the show, how that grim equation may be changing.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Fallen media mogul Harvey Weinstein's recent indictment on rape charges comes nearly eight months after allegations against him first surfaced. His case touched off a global #MeToo movement to speak out against workplace sexual harassment. And that, in turn, has created a deluge of complaints to human resources departments everywhere.

"It created this HR level of activity like nothing we've ever seen," says Johnny Taylor, CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management.

Updated at 6:39 p.m. ET

Apple on Monday announced a new app to allow users to get reports on how much their kids are using particular apps on their iPhones and iPads.

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Facing new accusations about how it handles users' data, Facebook says "we disagree" with reports that the company exposed a wealth of private information to other tech giants as part of its plan to become ubiquitous on mobile devices.

Facebook says it made deals with about 60 companies, from Apple, Amazon and Blackberry to HTC, Microsoft and Samsung, to "recreate Facebook-like experiences" on their devices.

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