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Curt Schilling, the MLB pitcher turned analyst for ESPN, was fired by the network after sharing a post on Facebook that appeared to comment on North Carolina's law that bars transgender people from using the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity.

No impurities, no chemicals, no artificial colors, no electricity, no gas, no phone and ... no clothes?

That's the premise of a pop-up restaurant, called The Bunyadi, that's scheduled to open in central London in June.

"We believe people should get the chance to enjoy and experience a night out without any impurities ... and even no clothes if they wish to," said restaurant founder Seb Lyall in a press release.

And, apparently, many people do so wish.

Earlier this month, Khairuldeen Makhzoomi, who came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and is currently a student at the University of California, Berkeley, was removed from a Southwest Airlines flight because another passenger overheard him speaking on his cellphone in Arabic.

Lowe's home improvement company, like a growing number of large companies nationwide, offers its employees an eye-catching benefit: Certain major surgeries at prestigious hospitals are free.

How do these firms do it? With a way of paying that's gaining steam across the health care industry, and that Medicare is now adopting for hip and knee replacements in 67 metropolitan areas, including New York, Miami and Denver.

Conor McGregor, one of the world's biggest mixed martial arts stars, shocked fans on Tuesday when he said he was retiring.

"I have decided to retire young. Thanks for the cheese. Catch ya's later," he tweeted.

San Francisco will soon begin requiring new buildings to have solar panels installed on the roof.

It's the first major U.S. city to have such a requirement, according to Scott Weiner, the city supervisor who introduced the bill.

Like so much on Capitol Hill, the encryption debate is charged with feelings. Law enforcement asserts criminals are "going dark." Privacy advocates say, that's not true; we are in a "Golden Age of Surveillance." What's missing, according to a leading voice on security inside Google, is evidence.

"People are acting a lot from fear, on both sides of the debate, frankly," says Adrian Ludwig, who is in charge of security for Android, the most popular operating system in the world.

The European Union has filed new antitrust charges against Google, alleging that it uses its Android operating system to impose unfair conditions on makers of mobile devices.

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We found that Google pursues an overall strategy on mobile devices to protect and expand its dominant position in internet search," Margrethe Vestager, the EU's commissioner for competition, said in a statement today.

On Tuesday, the state of Utah officially declared a new public health crisis: pornography.

Gov. Gary Herbert signed a resolution stating that pornography is a "public health hazard" that harms both individuals and society.

The nonbinding resolution calls for research, education and policy changes "to address the pornography epidemic that is harming the citizens of Utah and the nation."

Carmaker Mitsubishi Motors says "improper conduct" resulted in 625,000 of its vehicles getting inflated gas mileage ratings, in a scandal that's centered on minicars made for Japan's market.

The cars in question are Mitsubishi's eK Wagon and eK Space, as well as the Nissan Dayz and Dayz Roox (which the industrial giant made for Nissan Motors). While the scandal seems to be limited to the Japanese domestic market, Mitsubishi says it is now investigating vehicles it made for overseas markets as well.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Confused if you should "dip" or swipe your new chip card?

You might be haunted by the memory of the last time the machine balked when you inserted your chip credit card in the slot — and you suffered the impatient glares from that long line of people behind you.

It can take time for new technology to settle in. Chip cards, designed to curb fraud, have been in use in Europe and the rest of the world since 2002, but they're new to the United States.

Sen. Bernie Sanders says that if he is elected president in November, one of his first acts in office would be to begin breaking up the large financial institutions that pose a grave risk to the economy.

But there's a problem with that idea: It's not clear the president has the legal authority to break up the banks.

"It's not something the president can do. It's not even something the Treasury can do," says Karen Shaw Petrou, managing partner of Federal Financial Analytics.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S. lawmakers Tuesday once again brought Apple, the FBI, security experts and law enforcement officials to testify on the ongoing debate over encryption and the ability of investigators to access data on electronic devices.

Insurance giant UnitedHealth Group says it will stop selling insurance on Obamacare exchanges in most states starting next year.

In a Tuesday call detailing UnitedHealth's first quarter earnings, CEO Stephen Hemsley said the company would "remain only in a handful of states," after losing money on the individual health plans it sold on state exchanges.

Picture a dusty, nomadic herdsman around 5000 B.C., trudging with his mare somewhere in Central Asia, and pausing to quaff a refreshingly tart yogurt drink from his gourd. Fast-forward to the present day, and it seems all you need for your daily dose of friendly flora is to wander into the kitchen and pop a breakfast burrito in the microwave.

Updated at 12:24 p.m. ET, with Facebook statement

An 18-year-old woman in Ohio is being charged with kidnapping, rape, sexual battery and a variant of distributing child pornography.

What led to this extraordinary list of alleged crimes? Live-streaming the alleged rape of her 17-year-old friend.

Prosecutors say Marina Lonina broadcast the incident on the Twitter-owned app Periscope. Lonina claims through her lawyer that she live-streamed the alleged rape because she was trying to get the man to stop.

Editor's note: To take a sample Samsung Aptitude Test, click here or at the end of this story.

For weeks, young people who have already taken plenty of tests found themselves cramming for yet another one: the Samsung Aptitude Test, or SAT.

"Sometimes I feel a little bit nervous, but now I'm OK," says Daewon Kim, who studied about nine hours a day in the lead-up to Samsung's two-hour employment entrance exam.

We know that a third party helped FBI crack the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. But many questions remain. Should the FBI reveal the software loopholes, or vulnerabilities, of the iPhone to Apple? If yes, then what's the process? Can the hackers hold onto the technique and re-sell it in the future? And who can own a software vulnerability to begin with?

When companies uproot, executives usually point to factors like lower government taxes or fewer unions.

But one gun maker, Beretta, blames something entirely different — a law passed in Maryland to try to curb mass shootings.

The company recently moved its factory to Nashville, Tenn., because it says the law in Maryland threatened its business. The opening day was celebrated with shooting demonstrations and a warm welcome from state officials.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Outside Reno, in Nevada's high desert, Tesla is building what it says is the world's largest battery factory. The Gigafactory, as it's called, will churn out batteries for the company's electric cars. But it's also making something new — a battery for the home.

Tucked away in a dusty valley near Sparks, Nev., the Gigafactory is kind of like Willy Wonka's chocolate factory: It's mysterious, it's big and few people have been inside.

Actually, "big" may not do it justice.

Yellowstone National Park, a wilderness recreation area stretching for nearly 3,500 square miles atop a volcanic hot spot in Wyoming and parts of Montana and Idaho, may be in trouble.

Each year, Yellowstone attracts millions of visitors and provides a home to countless animal species, including the once-threatened grizzly bear and bison. But finding the right balance between tourism and preservation can be tricky.

Insurance giant United Healthcare Group has griped that the Obamacare insurance exchanges for health coverage are money-losers and has threatened to stop selling plans on them.

United Healthcare's latest move is to drop out of the Obamacare insurance market in Oklahoma in 2017. It's the fourth state that the company is abandoning because it says selling insurance plans on exchanges there is unprofitable.

This week, NPR and some member stations will be talking about trade on the campaign trail and in communities around the country.

Economists for decades have agreed that more open international trade is good for the U.S. economy. But recent research finds that while that's still true, when it comes to China, the downside for American workers has been much more painful than the experts predicted.

And that's playing out on the presidential campaign trail in a big way.

'Disastrous' Trade Agreements?

OPEC nations met in Qatar this weekend to discuss the possibility of a freeze in oil production, as a way to boost prices — but the oil producers couldn't come to an agreement.

Oil prices hit a 12-year low in January, The Associated Press notes, falling beneath $30 a barrel. The prospect of OPEC talks in Doha, Qatar, helped boost prices to around $40, but an analyst tells the AP they may fall again — perhaps sharply — after the talks collapsed.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Erika Stallings' mom was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 28. When it came back in her early 40s, her physicians started looking for clues.

"That's when the doctors realized there may be something genetic going on, and that's when she was tested, and found out she was a carrier for BRCA2," says Stallings.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes. Carrying a mutated BRCA gene increases a person's risk for developing certain cancers, including breast and ovarian cancer.

This week, as part of our A Nation Engaged project, NPR and some member stations will be talking about trade — both on the campaign trail and in communities around the country.

Trade has become a target this presidential campaign season.

Both Democrats and Republicans have been attacking trade agreements as "unfair" to American workers.

That resonates in places like Massena, N.Y., where voters cast primary ballots this week.

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