Business

Rethinking Retirement: The Changing Work Landscape
4:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:34 pm

Saving for retirement is a challenge facing most Americans. Research shows the challenge is made harder by our basic human impulses. We know we should be saving. But we don't. We consistently make bad financial decisions.

One thing that leads us astray is what behavioral economists call "loss aversion." In other words, we hate losing. And that gets in the way of us winning — if winning is making smart financial decisions.

How A Smashed Car Is Like A Smashed Nest Egg

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All Tech Considered
2:28 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

A Week Into His New Job, Controversy Forces Mozilla CEO To Resign

Mozilla co-founder Brendan Eich in 2010.
Drew McLellan Flickr

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:22 am

Brendan Eich, embattled co-founder of Mozilla and creator of the JavaScript programming language, has stepped down from his new role as CEO of Mozilla, the nonprofit foundation and tech company behind the Firefox browser.

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Business
2:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Transatlantic Duo Looks Into The Future Of Flight

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

And now, Delta Airlines and Virgin Air go together like Ford and Jaguar? That one didn't go so well. But in the case of these two very different airlines, which are global partners, marriage appears to be working out. So say our next two guests, Delta CEO Richard Anderson and Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson, they're both in Washington attending the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Aviation Summit this week.

And they've joined me in the studio. Welcome to both of you.

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Planet Money
1:53 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

In One Word, What's Your Biggest Source Of Work-Related Stress?

Katenesse Twitter

The big jobs report that comes out at the beginning of every month has tons of data on how the job market is doing. But it doesn't tell us much about what peoples' jobs are really like.

Last month, we asked people to tell us what they really do at work. This month, we asked: What's your biggest source of work-related stress? Tell us in one word and a photo, and explain why. Here are some of the responses.

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The Two-Way
6:44 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week

The scene at a job fair last fall in Van Nuys, Calif.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 11:18 am

There were 326,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, up by 16,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reported Thursday morning.

Although the number increased, claims remained at the lower end of the range they've been in for the past year and were running at a pace close to where they were before the economy sank into its latest recession in December 2007.

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Business
5:07 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Women Defy Hollywood's Conventional Wisdom

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:53 am

A new study shows that films featuring prominent female characters profit more than those that don't.

Business
4:11 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Odds Aren't Improving For Long-Term Unemployed Workers

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:53 am

There is still be a huge number of people who have been out of work for six months or more. Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution.

Business
4:07 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Amazon Unveils Fire TV, Its Video Streaming Device

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:53 am

Amazon is making an aggressive move toward your living room TV with a new video-streaming device. Amazon Fire TV joins a crowded field of devices vying for the same spot.

NPR Story
2:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

China Produces Plan To Boost Disappointing Economic Growth

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:53 am

China's new package is designed to keep the country on track to reach target growth rates of 7.5 percent for this year.

NPR Story
2:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Chemical Spill In W. Va. Tests Tolerance For Big Coal

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:27 am

Linda Wertheimer talks to Evan Osnos about his New Yorker piece in which he explores how the coal industry has become a political player in the state, and what that could mean for future regulation.

NPR Story
2:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

In Ann Arbor, Obama Gathers Support For Minimum Wage Hike

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:53 am

The Senate could vote on a minimum wage bill as soon as next week. But it is hard to imagine the Republican-controlled House will take it up.

NPR Story
2:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Breakfast Waffle Wars Heat Up

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:53 am

Taco Bell last week announced its Waffle Taco. Not to be outdone, White Castle is adding Waffle Sandwiches to its breakfast line. Fast food breakfast is a $50 billion market.

Paying For College
1:38 am
Thu April 3, 2014

First Test For College Hopefuls? Decoding Financial Aid Letters

Colleges send each prospective student a letter detailing a financial aid award package — but many families say the letters are difficult to understand.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:43 am

Around the country, millions of parents of prospective college freshmen are puzzling over one big question: How will we pay for college?

The first step for many families is reviewing the financial aid award letters they receive from each school. But often those letters can be confusing. Some are filled with acronyms and abbreviations, others lump scholarships and loans together. And because they're often very different, they're also difficult to compare.

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The Salt
3:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Stop, Thief! When Colleagues Steal From The Office Fridge

"Too darn funny what a co-worker put on top of her lunch. It was fake of course, but got the point across."
Courtesy of Toni Kinnard

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 7:54 pm

As a wedding planner, Jeanne Hamilton saw her share of very bad manners — people who made her think, "There should be an etiquette hell for people like you."

And bingo! That was the beginning of her website, Etiquette Hell, a repository of more than 6,000 firsthand accounts of bad behavior people witness in their fellow peers.

And the most frequent complaint? Fridge theft. It's rampant, apparently, in offices all over the world.

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Business
3:53 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Traders Defend High-Speed Systems Against Charges Of Rigging

"The stock market is rigged," says Michael Lewis, and high-frequency traders are to blame. But defenders of high-speed trading say it plays a legitimate role.
Paul Giamou iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 7:54 pm

The FBI and the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed this week that they're both investigating the world of high-frequency stock trading. They did so at a time when a new book on the subject, Flash Boys by Michael Lewis, is causing an uproar on Wall Street.

To read Lewis' book is to be reminded of how drastically the stock market has changed in a decade — and how opaque it remains. Lewis says this opacity serves to cover up some disturbing developments.

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
2:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Cycling's Catching On In Texas, For A Very Texas Reason

Bicycles and pedicabs along a dedicated bike lane in Austin, Texas.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 7:54 pm

For years, cyclists have faced long odds in Texas, where sprawling highways teem with trucks. Dallas was ranked the worst city for bicycling in the country, several years in a row. But in recent years, the two-wheeled form of transportation has begun to gain ground.

It's no surprise that progressive Austin — where the disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong still lives — has plenty of cyclists.

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The Salt
1:28 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.")
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 3:55 pm

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Wed April 2, 2014

GM Has 'Culture Of Cover-Up,' Key Senator Says

General Motors CEO Mary Barra as she testified Wednesday on Capitol Hill.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Day Two of General Motors CEO Mary Barra's time testifying before Congress about safety problems with her company's cars has been highlighted by a top senator saying the company "repeatedly lied" about its problems and has fostered a "culture of cover-up."

From The Detroit News:

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Sweetness And Light
6:58 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Deford: Paying College Athletes Would Level The Playing Field

Paycheck Players: Love of the game may no longer be enough motivation for college athletes.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

For many decades, baseball had a reserve clause, which essentially tied a baseball player to a franchise in perpetuity. The statute fell into legal jeopardy, and a few wise men amongst the owners said, maybe we ought to toss these players a bone, before we blow the whole scam.

But the owners were arrogant and stood pat, and, soon enough, the reserve clause, kit and caboodle, was outlawed as, essentially, un-American.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Job Growth Picked Up Some Speed In March, Survey Signals

Kiara Crawford, Brittney Winkler and Jessyca Freeman (left to right) were among those applying for work last month at a job fair in Washington, D.C. Early data from that month signal that job growth may have gained some speed.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The first slice of data about job growth in March offers some hope that the U.S. labor market gained some strength:

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Business
5:49 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Flights Canceled After Lufthansa Pilots Strike

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a three-day airline strike.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The German airline Lufthansa announced it has had to cancel approximately 3,800 flights because of a planned pilot's strike, which starts today and lasts until Friday.

Business
5:14 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Protesters Fault Taiwan For Trade Deal With China

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTORS)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And this is what a protest sounded like a few days ago in Taiwan, more than 100,000 people protesting a new trade agreement building ties between Chinese and Taiwanese businesses. Students are also upset. They've been occupying Taiwan's legislature for almost two weeks now.

NPR's Frank Langfitt explains why people are so angry.

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Around the Nation
4:16 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Finding A More Nuanced View Of Poverty's 'Black Hole'

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Ask Anne Valdez what poverty means for her, and her answer will describe much more than a simple lack of money.

"It's like being stuck in a black hole," says Valdez, 47, who is unemployed and trying to raise a teenage son in Coney Island, New York City. "Poverty is like literally being held back from enjoying life, almost to the point of not being able to breathe."

For years, researchers have complained that the way the government measures income and poverty is severely flawed, that it provides an incomplete — and even distorted — view.

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Politics
3:17 am
Wed April 2, 2014

GM CEO Pressed On Handling Of Ignition Switch Defect

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

There was only one thing the new head of General Motors could really say about its recall of defective vehicles. The recall was a decade in coming, and the defect has been linked to at least 13 deaths.

Mary Barra faced questions about it yesterday before Congress.

(SOUNDBITE OF CONGRESSIONAL HEARING)

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NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Ryan's Budget Plan Takes Midterm Elections Into Consideration

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Elsewhere on the program today we heard of President Obama's push to raise the minimum wage. Maybe it will become law; maybe it won't. Either way, Democrats believe it helps them in this election year. Now let's hear about Republicans.

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NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Ranch Dressing Is The Cream Of The Crop

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Our last word in business today: Dip it.

That's what millions of Americans are doing with ranch dressing. A new report says it is the salad topping of choice in cafeterias and restaurants in the United States. Its sales and shipments are doubled that of the number two dressing: blue cheese.

We are using ranch on salads, on broccoli, baked potatoes, chicken wings, even pizza.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Concerns Linger For N.C. Residents After Coal Ash Spill

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A federal criminal investigation is focusing on Duke Energy and a North Carolina state environmental agency. A couple of months ago, as you may recall, a storm water pipe ruptured and poured as much as 39,000 tons of potentially toxic carbon byproduct into the Dan River in North Carolina.

North Carolina Public Radio's Jeff Tiberii reports.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Mother Of Victim: More Killed By GM Ignition Switch Defect

Laura Christian, far right, talks about how her birth daughter Amber Marie Rose was killed on July 29, 2005, in a car crash that investigators determined was linked to a defective ignition switch.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 5:24 pm

The birth mother of Amber Marie Rose, the teen whose 2005 death was the first linked to an ignition switch problem that's triggered a massive recall of General Motors vehicles, says that through a Facebook group for families of victims, she's identified at least 29 fatalities due to the defect. GM only acknowledges 13 deaths.

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Business
3:27 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Never Too Late: More Older Adults Sold On Entrepreneurship

More and more older adults are becoming entrepreneurs instead of retiring, like Paul Tasner of Pulpworks, who spoke at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition in California.
Courtesy of Kevin Warnock

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:57 am

If you've ever been driven to rage and despair trying to pry open one of those plastic blister packs, Paul Tasner says it doesn't have to be that way. According to the 68-year-old Tasner, all it would take is for more products to use the packaging he's developed for his company, Pulpworks.

As you might guess from the name, it specializes in packaging made from pulp — from paper, cardboard, even sugarcane fiber — that's molded to fit a product.

"I just loved the idea of turning [what is] basically garbage into packaging," Tasner says.

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Planet Money
2:38 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

More House, Less Booze: How Spending Changes From Age 25 To 75

What is it about bars that brings out bad behavior?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 10:34 am

As anyone who has been 25 and not 25 can tell you, spending patterns change over the course of adult life.

We built the graph below to track these changes. It shows how different categories of spending change between age 25 and 75. For each category, spending at age 25 is equal to 1 on the graph.

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