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The Chronicle of Higher Education reported an unusual discovery on Monday. The founder, editor and columnist of a website that bills itself as a resource for student loan news does not exist.

When a consumer has a complaint about a bank, whether it's dealing with a mortgage or a credit card, right now there's a place to lodge that complaint online.

Note: This episode originally ran in 2015.

California is looking at a drought again. The last drought in California made life inconvenient in a lot of ways, from water rationing to taps actually running dry.

The thing is, then and now, there's actually still water in the ground. There are water aquifers literally underneath many of those homes with empty faucets. But the water level has gotten so low that they can't reach it anymore.

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Outside of Cheyenne, Wyoming is an 8,900-acre former ranch where cattle and horses once roamed. Now it's just open land with nothing but grass. When the owner passed away he didn't have a succession plan. With no obvious heirs, a family member sold it. It eventually became subdivided and a realty company now advertises it for redevelopment primarily as retirement or vacation properties.

A shortage of workers willing and able to do farm labor is forcing some big changes on California's agricultural sector.

On his farm in Ventura County, north of Los Angeles, Tom Deardorff has increased wages to attract workers for the jobs that require manual labor, and he's switched to automation where he can.

He still can't find enough workers, however, so he's had to make some drastic changes. He's stopped growing certain fruits and vegetables. And he's moved a lot of production south. To Mexico.

Every time Rupert Murdoch gets closer to control of the British-based entertainment and TV giant Sky, new obstacles arise.

The latest challenge could shatter his plans — or make him a richer man.

The Philippine island of Boracay is a tourist magnet, with its beaches regularly appearing on lists of the world's best. It's easy to see why.

"I think this is an amazing beach," says Frida Roemer from Copenhagen, lounging on the island's White Beach. "The clear water, the white sand ... I extended my ticket because I just liked it so much."

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Updated at 4:19 p.m. ET

Interest rates reached a milestone Tuesday and the stock market frowned.

Tuesday morning, for the first time in four years, the rate on the 10-year U.S. government note topped 3 percent. The bond market move contributed to a sharp sell-off in stocks, as investors wondered whether the long-running bull market might be at a pivot point.

The Port of Long Beach is one of the biggest ports in the country. It and its neighbor, the Port of Los Angeles, handle 390 billion dollars worth of goods every year.

And business has boomed as the economy has improved. U.S. consumers bought more stuff; ships started getting bigger to meet demand; the Port of Long Beach invested billions.

Seventy percent of the ships that dock at the port come from China. So talk of a trade war has everybody's attention down on the docks.

This morning in New York City, the streaming giant Spotify -- which began publicly trading earlier this month and has a current valuation of $28 billion -- held a press conference to announce changes to the free version of its mobile app for both iOS and Android.

Updated at 1:12 p.m. ET

Organizers of a newsroom union at the Chicago Tribune have informed its publisher that colleagues have given such overwhelming formal support for their effort that the paper's parent company should recognize the guild voluntarily and start to negotiate a contract.

The organizers gave the Tribune's parent company, Tronc, a day to make a decision.

China's employers engage in blatant gender discrimination, often advertising jobs for "men only," while others hire women with physical attributes aimed at appealing to their male coworkers, according to a new study published this week by Human Rights Watch.

President Trump's tariffs on imported steel aren't the first time the industry has gotten protection from the U.S. government. Not by a long shot. In fact, tariff protection for the industry — which politicians often say is a vital national interest — goes back to the very beginning of the republic.

In his book, Clashing Over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy, Dartmouth professor Douglas Irwin writes that protection for the metal producers began in the 1790s.

From the company that brought you the option of letting a courier inside your home comes a new service: package delivery inside your car.

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Volkswagen is trying yet again to turn the page after its emissions cheating scandal — leaving diesel behind in favor of electric cars.

The major shift comes as the German automaker — the world's largest in term of cars sold — has a new leader in Herbert Diess.

Facebook announced changes to its content review policy Tuesday, adding an appeals process for removed content and releasing the internal guidelines it relies on to make content determinations.

While the social media giant has listed a set of publicly available community standards for several years, the latest update includes the more detailed guidelines that content reviewers use internally when deciding whether to allow or remove posts.

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OK, the Me Too movement has spotlighted sexual harassment in the workplace, but what about discrimination before you get the job? A new report finds that China's top employers routinely publish sexist ads. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports.

Most people, when they think of Los Angeles, think immediately of Hollywood.

But LA is about a lot more than movies.

NPR's Sonari Glinton gave us an overview of the City of Angels that came with a few surprises.

What Will Change In Cuba After Castro?

Apr 23, 2018

Cuba’s culture is rich. Its economy remains poor. The island’s new president, Miguel Díaz-Canel, has promised to be faithful to the revolution, as millions of Cubans still struggle to make ends meet. Can communism prevail?

Since long before anyone can remember, the big, fertile slopes of the Alazani Valley in eastern Georgia have been planted with grapevines. It's the heartland of winemaking in the country that invented it 8,000 years ago. But in recent months, the valley has been going through a new kind of ferment, because of bitcoin.

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So how exactly can your neighborhood coffee store shut down for a few hours and then reopen with a little less bias? That's what Starbucks proposes to do after a much publicized arrest of two black men at a Starbucks in Philadelphia. Here's Simone Alicea of KNKX in Seattle.

"I thought this just happened to me."

That's the refrain from dozens of teachers who reached out to NPR — via email and social media — in response to our investigative story about serious problems with a federal grant program that, they say, have left them unfairly saddled with thousands of dollars of debts they shouldn't have to pay.

Amazon has been one of President Trump's favorite targets on Twitter.

He has accused the company of not collecting taxes (which it does), charged it with putting retailers out of business — and focused his attacks on the tech company's relationship with the Postal Service.

So the president might be surprised to learn that one of Amazon's biggest customers is, in fact, the federal government. Amazon's relationship with the government goes well beyond delivering packages — to playing a vital role in protecting America's national security secrets.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Billboards are having a moment.

Traditional advertising has been falling for years. Companies just aren't spending as much on newspaper, radio and television ads. And last year was not much better, according to an industry report.

But there is one traditional advertising form that is showing signs of life: billboards and other parts of the segment known as out-of-home advertising.

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