Arts

The Salt
11:34 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Beer-Tapping Physics: Why A Hit To A Bottle Makes A Foam Volcano

Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:37 am

Ah, the old beer-tapping prank: One strong hit on the top of an open beer bottle, and poof! Your IPA explodes into a brewski volcano.

"In one second, most of your beer has really turned into foam," says physicist Javier Rodriguez Rodriguez of Carlos III University in Madrid. "You better have put the bottle into your mouth, because you need to drink whatever is coming out."

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Food
11:05 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Don't Stuff The Turkey And Other Tips From 'America's Test Kitchen'

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:24 pm

If there's one Thanksgiving mistake Jack Bishop sees more than any other, it's people rushing to carve their birds. Bishop is editorial director of the public TV series America's Test Kitchen. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "Turkey needs to rest before you carve it ... and a lot fewer juices will end up on the carving board."

Bishop and Bridget Lancaster, also of America's Test Kitchen, share their tips for buying, seasoning and cooking a turkey, and describe some of their favorite side dishes.

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Monkey See
10:39 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Katie Couric And Yahoo!: Two Brands Wondering What's Next

Katie Couric made her name on NBC's Today show, which she hosted for 15 years. Since leaving the network in 2006, Couric has anchored CBS Evening News and launched her own daytime talk show on ABC, Katie.
Ida Mae Astute AP

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

Depending on which analyst you read, Katie Couric's move to become "global anchor" for Yahoo! News is either a "bad bet" and an "awkward fit," or an "upheaval in the pecking order" that could "signal the end of old media dominance."

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Arts & Life
9:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Saving Yourself From Thanksgiving T.M.I.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, a couple of days until Thanksgiving means just a short wait for pie. But instead of slicing it up this year, have you thought about putting it on a stick? Let us be the first to introduce you to pie pops. That's later. But first, you may get your fill of more than just dessert this holiday season. You might also be treated to a heaping helping of family news.

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Religion
9:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Meet Mensch On A Bench, Jewish Counterpart To Elf On The Shelf

Courtesy of Neal Hoffman

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 2:27 pm

During a visit to a store last holiday season, Jewish father Neal Hoffman felt bad telling his son Jake that he couldn't have an Elf on the Shelf. The widely popular Christmas toy is intended to watch children's behavior for Santa. Hoffman kept thinking, maybe there could be something similar, but rooted in Jewish tradition.

Hoffman, a former Hasbro employee, decided Mensch on a Bench was the answer. "A mensch means a really good person. It's a person that you strive to be," he says.

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The Two-Way
5:23 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Book News: Secret Video Documents Conditions In Amazon Warehouse

A worker at the Amazon fulfillment center in Swansea, Wales, processes orders in 2011.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 6:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Code Switch
2:47 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

What Do We Mean When We Talk About 'Latino Art'?

Radiante, Olga Albizu
Courtesy of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 4:42 pm

When the Whitney Museum of American Art announced the artists for its 2014 biennial, people took to the Internet to chime in about who's been included and who's been left out; the last biennial had been blasted for ignoring Latino artists. But when a new show opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum featuring only Latino artists — "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" — it was blasted for other reasons.

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The Salt
1:22 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Oprah's 'Love Sandwich'

Peter wonders if starting P Magazine was such a good idea.
NPR

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:41 pm

Subscribers to Oprah's O magazine wait all year for the "Oprah's Favorite Things" issue, in which Oprah lists a bunch of things you need to buy if you want any chance of becoming Oprah. It's just out, and in it Oprah mentions that she makes for Stedman something she calls a "Love Sandwich." If you don't know who Stedman is, I'm not even going to put a link here to help you, because really, you should already know.

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New In Paperback
1:01 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Nov. 25-Dec. 1: A Scholar, A Singer And Princeton's Dark Secrets

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 9:36 am

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
12:15 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Roosevelt's Polio Wasn't A Secret: He Used It To His 'Advantage'

Franklin D. Roosevelt smiled upon hearing that he was leading the 1928 contest for governor of New York, more than six years after he contracted polio.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:07 pm

Americans remember Franklin Delano Roosevelt as the president who led the country through the Great Depression and World War II. He bolstered the nation's spirits with his confidence, strength and optimism, despite being crippled by polio, a disability that's largely invisible in photographs and newsreels of his presidency.

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The Salt
11:16 am
Mon November 25, 2013

An Omnivore's Dilemma: Would You Eat Michael Pollan Microbe Cheese?

Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School.
Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 1:03 pm

Making your own cheese and yogurt is all the rage these days. (Our friends at Kitchen Window broke down the process in a recent post, if you're curious.)

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The Two-Way
9:57 am
Mon November 25, 2013

500,000 Lights: Family's Christmas Display Sets World Record

Decorating their house and yard with more than 31 miles' worth of lights, an Australian family has reclaimed a Guinness world record in Canberra, Australia.
Guinness World Records 2014 is out now

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 11:28 am

The Christmas decorating season is in full bloom in Australia, where a family's use of more than half a million lights has set a new world record. The Richards family's yard in Forrest, a suburb of Canberra, features a canopy of lights fanning out beneath a large tree whose trunk is wrapped in glowing colors.

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Africa
9:36 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Winnie: Not 'Just The Woman Who Stood By Mandela's Side'

Idris Elba (as Nelson Mandela) and Naomie Harris (as Winnie Mandela) in a scene from his trial.
Keith Bernstein The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 5:39 pm

A new film about Nelson Mandela's public rise in South Africa also takes a close look at the personal side of his life with former wife, Winnie.

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Monkey See
7:31 am
Mon November 25, 2013

What Really Makes Katniss Stand Out? Peeta, Her Movie Girlfriend

Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson in Catching Fire.
Lionsgate

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 1:02 pm

[General Hunger Games/Catching Fire information below; no huge surprises revealed.]

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The Two-Way
5:18 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Book News: Wanda Coleman, L.A.'s 'Unofficial Poet Laureate,' Dies

Arthur Miller with award finalist for poetry Wanda Coleman at the 2001 National Book Awards in New York City.
Scott Gries Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Television
1:03 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Bill Cosby, Still Himself After All These Years

Bill Cosby performs his stand-up special, Far From Finished. The actor and comedian has been working in show business for 50 years.
Erinn Chalene Cosby Comedy Central

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 11:11 am

Comedian Bill Cosby has been in show business for 50 years, and he celebrated on Comedy Central over the weekend with a stand-up special — his first in 30 years — called Far From Finished.

That earlier special, called Bill Cosby Himself, inspired one of the most popular sitcoms in TV history: The Cosby Show, starring Cosby as paterfamilias Cliff Huxtable. It was a show that was really the first of its kind, capturing life in a highly educated upper-middle-class African-American family.

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Arts & Life
9:30 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Expatriates Make Do Or Do Without For Thanksgiving

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 11:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here in the U.S., Thanksgiving's no problem, right? You go to the grocery store, you pick up your turkey, your cranberries, various other holiday delights and you're good to go. But putting together a Thanksgiving meal outside of these United States can sometimes require more creativity. We caught up with some American expats determined to conjure up the holiday. Jessica Osbourne in Seoul says there's one Thanksgiving food she can count on.

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Author Interviews
9:25 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Daniel Menaker's 'Mistake' Formed His Life View

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Daniel Menaker knows writing. He also knows writers. He' was the fiction editor at The New Yorker for 20 years and later editor-in-chief at Random House. He's worked with an astonishing group of writers over the years: Alice Munro, Elizabeth Strout, David Foster Wallace, Billy Collins. This list could go on and on. And, of course, he is a writer himself, the author of six books.

His latest, a memoir is called "My Mistake." It's arranged chronological starting at the very beginning of his obsession with words.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:28 am
Sun November 24, 2013

We Plant The Seed, You Pick The Tree

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:57 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a tree. Identify the tree name from its anagram. For example, given "has," the answer would be "ash."

Last week's challenge from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass.: Think of a word meaning "quarrel" in which several of the letters appear more than once. Remove exactly two occurrences of every repeated letter, and the remaining letters can be rearranged to spell a new word meaning "quarrel." What are the two words?

Answer: Misunderstanding, argument

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Three Books...
5:03 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Day In, Day Out: Three Not-At-All-Boring Books On Tedium

Andrey Popov IStockphoto

Consider how many synonyms there are for tedium: boredom, monotony, uniformity, dreariness, ennui, listlessness, each with its own subtle nuances. Perhaps it says something about our society that we must differentiate between the boredom of the office cubicle and of the traffic jam.

None of the authors below set out to write a book about tedium, but hovering always just behind the scenes is that debilitating affliction, sluggish and repetitious, playing a central role in their lives.

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Author Interviews
3:48 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Thanksgiving Dinner Deja Vu? Try French Food This Year

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

As you're thinking about this year's Thanksgiving menu, you might be feeling a bit bored. Green bean casserole? Been there. Turkey and stuffing? Meh. Pumpkin pie? Cliché.

We were looking for a little Thanksgiving inspiration, so we reached out to culinary legend Patricia Wells. The veteran restaurant critic and cookbook author has been teaching French cooking for nearly two decades in Paris and Provence.

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Theater
3:42 am
Sun November 24, 2013

A Couple Of Knights (And Matinees) On Broadway

Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen play Vladimir and Estragon in Waiting for Godot, one of two 20th-century classics they're doing in repertory this season on Broadway.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:50 am

Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart have known each other for years — they were both actors at the Royal Shakespeare Company in the '60s and '70s, and both achieved broader fame through movies and television. Both were knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for their work onstage and off. And then, of course, they were cast as mortal enemies in the first X-Men film 14 years ago, and have come back to the roles of Magneto and Professor X several times since.

"We became good friends as a result of shooting multimillion-dollar adventure movies," Stewart says.

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Book Reviews
3:14 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

An Inside Look That Strips The Face Paint Off The NFL

New York Jets tight end Josh Baker celebrates after scoring a touchdown during the first quarter in the game against the New York Giants in 2011.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 6:44 pm

Nicholas Dawidoff's Collision Low Crossers: A Year Inside the Turbulent World of NFL Football may be the best book I've ever read about football. It is certainly the most detailed account of the players inside the helmets and the coaches obscured from an enthralled public by large, laminated playsheets.

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Technology
3:14 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Online Streaming Deal Could Mean All Homer Simpson, All The Time

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 4:07 pm

After a fierce bidding war, FX spinoff cable network FXX won the rights to make all seasons of TV's longest-running scripted show, The Simpsons, available for online streaming. It may be the largest TV syndication deal ever. Anthony Breznican, a senior writer at Entertainment Weekly, says the deal shows how networks are trying to capitalize on the "binge watching" trend. The deal gives FXX the right to air more than 500 episodes of The Simpsons, now in its 25th season on Fox.

Movie Reviews
3:14 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Two Very Different Movies, Two Heroines With Spine

Jennifer Lawrence makes her second appearance as the savvy, steel-spined Katniss Everdeen in the dystopian Hunger Games series.
Murray Close Lionsgate

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 4:07 pm

It's a fact of Hollywood life that the movie industry is dominated by men. Male stars make more money. Male executives make more decisions. And the vast majority of films are about what men do, or think, or blow up. But this weekend, two heroines are the backbone — the impressively sturdy backbone — of two very different pictures.

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Author Interviews
2:21 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

'Hunting Season' Examines Racism And Violence In An All-American Town

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 4:07 pm

On a chilly night in November 2008, an Ecuadorean immigrant named Marcelo Lucero was attacked and murdered in the Long Island town of Patchogue, N.Y., where he lived and worked. His attackers, a group of local teenagers, were out "hunting for beaners" — an activity that had become part of their weekly routine.

Lucero, then 37, and his childhood friend, Angel Loja, were out for a late-night stroll when they saw a group of seven young people approaching them.

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Theater
5:35 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Broadway's Season Of Adventure

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: The fall season is underway on Broadway. And NPR's Trey Graham may still be a little glassy-eyed, because took in five shows over a three-day weekend. He joins us in our studios. Trey, thanks for making time for us.

TREY GRAHAM, BYLINE: Thanks for having me.

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Author Interviews
5:35 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Even On The Water, Class Remains In Session

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 3:24 pm

As Matt de le Pena's book, The Living, opens, a young man named Shy works as a towel boy by day and a water boy at night, spending his summer earning money on a cruise ship.

Then the big one hits — the epochal earthquake that Californians have always heard would strike one day — and 17-year-old Shy is flung into shark-infested seas from a sinking ship.

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Fine Art
5:35 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Kiefer's Bleak Horrors Of War Fill An Entire Building

Anselm Kiefer's Velimir Chlebnikov, a series of 30 paintings devoted to the Russian philosopher who posited that war is inevitable, is on display at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.
MASS MoCA

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 6:50 pm

Anselm Kiefer was born in 1945, in the Black Forest of southwest Germany, just as the Third Reich was collapsing.

"I was born in ruins, and for me, ruins are something positive," Kiefer says. "Because what you see as a child is positive, you know? And they are positive because they are the beginning of something new."

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Television
3:25 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Sarah Silverman, Serving Up Sinfully Divine Comedy

Nothing's sacred in We Are Miracles — but then as Sarah Silverman told Terry Gross in 2010, "there's a safety in what I do because I'm always the idiot. ... I'm always the ignoramus no matter what I talk about or what tragic event, off-color, dark scenario is evoked in my material."
Janet Van Ham HBO

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 9:18 am

Sarah Silverman is funny — sweet, bawdy, innocent, outrageous, Emmy-winning, milk-through-your-nose funny. And her new comedy special, We are Miracles, debuts tonight on HBO.

Performing in front of a live audience, the comedian takes on religion, pornography, childhood, politics and stereotypes, and no one's left standing. (No really: One punchline involves Hitler being assigned "Heil Marys" as penance.)

Silverman tells NPR's Scott Simon that she thinks good comedy comes from "some kind of childhood humiliation or darkness."

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