Arts

The Salt
2:59 pm
Sun September 22, 2013

Move Over Vodka; Korean Soju's Taking A Shot At America

Boxes of empty Jinro soju bottles sit in a downtown Seoul, South Korea, shop on April 1, 2005.
Jung Yeon-Je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 1:35 pm

Every year, the trade magazine Drinks International puts out a list of the top-selling alcohols in the world, and in the category of spirits, there is one brand that more than doubles the sales of its closest competitor every year. Smirnoff, Jack Daniel's and Bacardi don't even come close.

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Author Interviews
2:59 pm
Sun September 22, 2013

'Hollywood Said No,' But 'Mr. Show' Fans Said Yes!

From left, Bob Odenkirk and David Cross co-created the sketch comedy series Mr. Show. They have since played long-running roles on Breaking Bad and Arrested Development, respectively.
Sharon Alagna Courtesy of Grand Central Publishing

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 4:19 pm

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Author Interviews
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Abused By Both Polanski And Media, 'The Girl' Moves On

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

In March of 1977, a 13-year-old aspiring actress scored what she thought would be her big break: a magazine photo shoot with a famous movie director. What happened that day made headlines around the world: Director Roman Polanski, then 43, gave Samantha Gailey a hefty helping of champagne and Quaaludes, then raped her.

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The Sunday Conversation
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

NFL Veteran Recounts The Bruises And Breaks Of Life In The League.

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Being a professional football player can be a brutal life. Nate Jackson spent six years in the NFL, mostly as a receiver with the Denver Broncos, and while he wasn't a star — or even a starter — he did carve out life in the rarefied air of professional sports, and he got just as banged up as any big-name player. But he learned to play through the pain.

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Sunday Puzzle
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Play The Blame Game

NPR

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

On-air challenge: You will be given two words. Think of a third word that can follow each to complete a familiar two-word phrase. The third word will rhyme with one of the given words. For example, given "blame" and "board," you would say "game," as in "blame game" and "board game."

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Photography
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

In Ed Ruscha's Work, A City Sits For Its Portrait

Another image from Twentysix Gasoline Stations: œStandard, Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, taken in 1962. The humble gas station also made an appearance in Ruscha's painted works.
Ed Ruscha Courtesy of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

For a seminal work of art, Twentysix Gasoline Stations doesn't look like much. It's a small, thin paperback book resembling an old industrial manual — just 26 black-and-white photos of gas stations that Los Angeles artist Ed Ruscha self-published 50 years ago, when he was 26.

"If I showed the book to somebody who worked in a gas station, they might be genuinely interested in it, saying, 'Oh yeah, I remember that place out on the highway.' "

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Books News & Features
5:03 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Banned Romance: What's So Bad About Happily Ever After?

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 10:07 am

As Banned Books Week begins, it's a good time to examine one genre that frequently falls afoul of censors: romance.

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Movie Interviews
3:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

'Wadjda' Director: 'It Is Time To Open Up'

Women aren't permitted to travel unattended in the streets of Saudi Arabia, so Wadjda director Haifaa Al Mansour worked from inside a van, communicating with her crew via walkie-talkie.
Tobias Kownatzki Razor Film/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

Wadjda, being touted as the first feature film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia — a country with no movie theaters and a relationship with cinema that's complicated at best — tells the story of a defiant 10-year-old pushing back against the social expectations that define her life as a young Saudi woman.

Wadjda's source of independence comes in the form of a green bicycle she wants to buy for herself. But girls in Saudi Arabia don't ride bicycles, so she has to be creative.

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Monkey See
10:10 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

On TV's Big Night, Can Netflix Crash The Emmy Party?

Neil Patrick Harris will host the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards Sunday on CBS.
Nino Munoz CBS

It might seem like the only TV serious viewers are paying attention to right now is Breaking Bad, but on Sunday night, just as Walter White's penultimate episode is unfolding on AMC, we'll be finding out over on CBS whether his show, his portrayer Bryan Cranston, or other personnel will be taking home Primetime Emmy Awards.

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Books
3:45 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

'Epic Pale Whale Fail': Oswalt's Contribution To 'Moby-Dick'

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 3:05 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

From NPR West, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Arun Rath.

It's one of the monuments of American literature, Herman Melville's "Moby Dick." The Los Angeles library system posed a challenge to Twitter followers recently. Send us your best 140-character summary of the novel. Among the responses they received: Epic pale whale fail, Ishmael goes fishing with Ahab who has male fish issues and: We're going to need a bigger metaphor. Those three were submitted by comedian Patton Oswalt.

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Around the Nation
3:45 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

Hollywood's Chinese Theater Reopens After Makeover

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Our first show from NPR West in Southern California coincides with another grand occasion, the reopening of the iconic Chinese Theater on Hollywood Boulevard. It's been refurbished and reconfigured. And as NPR's Sam Sanders reports, it has a new name too.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell...

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: Since 1927, stars have been parading down the red carpet and making their marks here.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Movie Interviews
5:46 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Isaiah Washington, Taking On A Killer Of A Character

Isaiah Washington (left) plays a sort of fatal father figure to Tequan Richmond's Lee in Blue Caprice. The characters are inspired by the so-called Beltway snipers, who killed 10 people in and around Washington, D.C., in 2002.
IFC Films

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 11:06 am

The motion picture Blue Caprice seems to be about a boy who's been abandoned by his mother and aches for a father. He meets a man who can no longer see his own children, and who longs for a son. They find each other — but what follows is anything but a happy ending.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
5:03 am
Sat September 21, 2013

For Shy Girl, Poe's Rapping And Tapping Inspired More Than Fear

Marius G. Sipa iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 2:16 pm

Koren Zailckas' latest book is the novel Mother, Mother.

The fourth grade blessed me with "the cool teacher." I've long since forgotten his name, but I haven't forgotten the sound of him tearing into the teacher's parking lot every day on his Harley Davidson. In memory, Mr. Cool towered over me at six-foot-something, his death-metal hair offset by a wiry goatee, his Air Jordans a bright counterpoint to his spider web tie.

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Author Interviews
3:36 am
Sat September 21, 2013

A Road Trip Sparks An Unlikely Friendship In 'Norvelt To Nowhere'

Jack Gantos recently won the Newbery Medal, the highest award in children's literature, for his novel Dead End in Norvelt.
Anne Lower Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 9:34 am

From Norvelt to Nowhere is a book that begins in the shadow of nuclear annihilation, during the Cuban missile crisis in 1962. The first few paragraphs also disclose that nine elderly women in the town of Norvelt are dead by poison.

Did we mention it's a kids' book, too?

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The Salt
3:35 am
Sat September 21, 2013

No Schmear Job: A Brief History Of Bagels And Lox

A marriage made in New York, though both partners came with plenty of baggage.
Jerry Deutsch iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 3:35 pm

There's a certain kind of joy in breaking the overnight fast by biting into a bagel: crackling crust, chewy center, smooth and silky cream cheese, sharp smoked salmon. For some, capers and onions join the ritual.

But just who invented this breakfast staple, which has become as American as apple pie?

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:19 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Not My Job: Comedian Jeff Garlin Gets Quizzed On The IgNobels

Peter Kramer Getty Images for TFF

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 8:36 am

Jeff Garlin is a Chicago-born comedian who became well-known playing Larry David's manager on Curb Your Enthusiasm. He's got a new sitcom on ABC called The Goldbergs and a new film, Dealin' with Idiots, which he wrote, directed and stars in.

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Movie Interviews
2:34 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Stuart Blumberg Really Wants To Talk About Sex

Stuart Blumberg has written several films, but Thanks for Sharing is his first directorial effort.
Anne Joyce Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 3:28 pm

When somebody enters a 12-step program to deal with addiction, it's meant to be an all-encompassing, life-changing process — and one we don't always hear about.

But in Stuart Blumberg's romantic comedy Thanks for Sharing, which hits theaters this weekend, the 12-step program is front and center. In this case it's for people struggling day to day with sex addiction, forging bonds with their fellow addicts and sponsors.

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Movie Reviews
11:30 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Gandolfini Is So Vivid In 'Enough Said,' You Forget He's Gone

James Gandolfini plays a divorced TV archivist who falls in love with a divorced masseuse, played by Julia-Louis Dreyfus, in Nicole Holofcener'€™s Enough Said.
Lacey Terrell Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:42 am

Nicole Holofcener's Enough Said is her most conventional comedy since her 1996 debut, Walking and Talking. I don't love it as much as her scattershot ensemble movies Friends With Money and Please Give, but it has enough weird dissonances and hilarious little curlicues to remind you her voice is like no other. I love it enough.

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Books
9:57 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Could Banning Books Actually Encourage More Readers?

What do the books "The Catcher in the Rye," "Invisible Man" and Anne Frank's diary have in common? They've all been banned from libraries. On Sunday, the American Library Association begins its annual recognition of Banned Books Week. Tell Me More host Michel Martin talks to former ALA president Loriene Roy about targeted books, and efforts to keep them on shelves.

Barbershop
9:48 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Is Public Numb To Mass Shootings?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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TED Radio Hour
8:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Are The Dangers Of A Single Story?

Novelist Chimamanda Adichie at the TEDGlobal conference in 2009.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 11:25 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Chimamanda Adichie's TEDTalk

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

About Chimamanda Adichie

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TED Radio Hour
8:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Makes A Good Story?

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton on the TED stage in 2012.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 11:45 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Andrew Stanton's TEDTalk

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TED Radio Hour
8:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

How Do Book Covers Tell Their Own Stories?

"A book cover designer is making a piece of art — a piece of design — that's very much in service to another piece of art." — Chip Kidd
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Chip Kidd's TEDTalk

Chip Kidd doesn't judge a book by its cover; he creates covers that embody the books — and he does it with a wicked sense of humor. Kidd showcases the art and deep thought of his cover designs.

About Chip Kidd

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TED Radio Hour
8:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

How Do You Find A Story In A Painting?

Author Tracy Chevalier speaking at the TED Salon in 2012.
Dayfdd Jones TED

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 11:45 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Tracy Chevalier's TEDTalk

When writer Tracy Chevalier looks at paintings, she imagines the stories behind them: How did the painter meet his model? What would explain that look in her eye? She shares the story of Vermeer's most famous painting that inspired her best-selling novel "Girl With a Pearl Earring."

About Tracy Chevalier

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Movie Reviews
7:39 am
Fri September 20, 2013

In 'Rush' As In Real Life, It's The Driver, Not The Car

The radically different Formula One racers James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth, left) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) are at the center of Ron Howard's Rush, a biographical drama that's as strong on character as on cars.
Jaap Buitendijk Universal Pictures

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 7:52 am

You might think that if the driving scenes in your auto-racing movie are the least interesting thing about it, that's a problem. But it's far from a sign of engine trouble for Rush, a swift-moving, character-rich biopic whose kinetic Grand Prix sequences are constantly being overshadowed by genuinely riveting scenes of ... people talking.

But then in a film written by Peter Morgan — of The Queen and Frost/Nixon -- maybe it's no wonder that questions like why they drive, why they want to win and who they want to beat take center stage.

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Monkey See
7:18 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Autumn Leaves, Cumberbatches, And More Fall Amusements

Martin Freeman as the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug.
Mark Pokorny Warner Brothers Pictures
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show finds me, Stephen, Trey and Glen together again in the studio, but due to a scheduling tweak, finds us in Historic Studio 45 instead of Historic Studio 44, so we hope you can all still follow the conversation.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Don't Worry, Kids, These (Sex) Addicts Are All Right

Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow star in Thanks for Sharing, a heartfelt if overstuffed take on addiction and recovery.
Anne Joyce Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions

Somewhere between Tim Robbins' angry assumption about his wife's pain pills and Pink's ecstatic-dance excursion with the guy from Book of Mormon, I realized that the dealing-with-addiction drama Thanks for Sharing really, really wanted to tell me everything it knows about life in recovery. As a critic, I've gotta acknowledge the problems that kind of crowding creates for a storyteller. As a person, I've gotta admire the generosity it bespeaks.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

A 'Shot' In The Gloom, And All Hell Breaks Loose

Sam Rockwell plays John Moon, an unemployed farmer who launches a series of unfortunate and bloody events after he mistakenly shoots a woman while hunting a deer.
Tribeca Film/Well Go USA Entertainment.

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:52 pm

Watch enough TV or movies these days, and you're likely to witness a throat getting slit. Not off-screen, or in a flash, but performed in full view of an unflinching camera. Call it authenticity, call it chutzpah or call it sadism, it takes only a few episodes of, say, Boardwalk Empire or Breaking Bad to realize that our visual storytellers are increasingly going for the gore.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

'Enough,' Almost, But At Least There's Gandolfini

After James Gandolfini's death this past June, the actor's turn in Enough Said, where he stars opposite Julia Louis-Dreyfus as a man looking for a second chance at love, has taken on a tinge of the bittersweet.
Lacey Terrell Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:40 pm

It was writer-director Nicole Holofcener's good fortune, and her bad luck, to have snagged James Gandolfini for Enough Said, her comedy about two imminent empty-nesters dipping their toes into fresh romantic waters. Given his untimely death, the film is likely to be remembered less for its own modest virtues than as a last chance to say a bittersweet farewell to its star.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

From Lebanon To Israel, With An Olive Tree In Tow

Zaytoun follows Yoni (Stephen Dorff), an Israeli fighter pilot, and Fahed (Abdallah El Akal), a young Palestinian boy, as they travel together and form an unlikely bond.
Eitan Riklis Strand Releasing

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 6:27 am

Israeli director Eran Riklis often depicts characters separated by borders. In The Syrian Bride, a Druze woman leaves Israel to marry, knowing she can never return to visit her family; in Lemon Tree, a privileged Israeli woman and a disadvantaged Palestinian regard one another warily from opposite sides of the fence between free and occupied territory.

Zaytoun is different: This time, the director allows his characters to cross the frontier. That makes for a story that's sweeter, but also less convincing.

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