Arts

Wisdom Watch
10:33 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Cable And Corruption In Southern California

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now it's time for a Wisdom Watch conversation. That's a part of the program where we talk to those who've made a difference with their work. Today we're talking with Clinton Galloway. He's the author of the book "Anatomy of a Hustle: Cable Comes to South Central L.A."

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Monkey See
10:17 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Viewer Discretion: Deciding When To Look Away

The Louisville Cardinals huddle up on the court after teammate Kevin Ware injured his leg in the first half against the Duke Blue Devils on Sunday.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

I was out of the house, as it happens, for most of the first half of yesterday's Louisville-Duke game, and when I got home and looked at Twitter, before I turned on the TV, there was a huge stack of stuff to read, and the first thing that caught my attention about the game was this.

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New In Paperback
9:34 am
Mon April 1, 2013

April 1-7: An MIA Mom, A Deluded Romance And Homegrown Terrorism

Harper

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:18 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Book News: Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder, Researchers Say

William Shakespeare, brilliant playwright and cutthroat businessman?
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Performing Arts
3:22 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

For Female Magicians, The First Trick Is Being Accepted

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 4:28 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks to female magician, Dorothy Dietrich, on the struggles of being a female in a male dominated magic world.

Author Interviews
3:08 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

An Unlikely Explorer Stumbles Into Controversy

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 11:03 am

The mostly forgotten explorer Paul du Chaillu introduced the world to gorillas. His methods were attacked and his work discredited during his lifetime, but he also experienced fame and redemption.

Author Monte Reel illuminates the little-known tale of the 19th century explorer in his new book Between Man and Beast: An Unlikely Explorer, the Evolution Debates, and the African Adventure That Took the Victorian World by Storm.

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Movie Interviews
8:03 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Cristian Mungiu: Metaphor Or Not, 'Hills' Has Eyes For Romania's Past

Director Cristian Mungiu on the set of his new film, Beyond the Hills. As in his earlier 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, the filmmaker focuses on two young women adrift in the post-Soviet wilderness of Romania.
Sundance Selects

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 4:28 pm

Cristian Mungiu became the poster boy for the Romanian New Wave when his film 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days took the top prize at the Cannes International Film Festival in 2007. Like that film, Mungiu's latest turns an unblinking camera on two troubled young women in a dysfunctional society. Beyond the Hills is now opening in theaters across the U.S.

Like its predecessor, Beyond the Hills was a prizewinner at Cannes: Its two young stars shared the best actress prize last year, and Mungiu won best screenplay.

The story he tells is disturbing.

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You Must Read This
5:03 am
Sun March 31, 2013

In Alice McDermott's 'Charming Billy', Love Turns To Grief

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:12 am

Harold Augenbraum is the executive director of the National Book Foundation.

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The Salt
3:42 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Italy's Chocolate Easter Eggs: Big, Bold And Full Of Bling

In 2012, an Italian chocolatier presented Benedict XVI, now pope emeritus, with a 6.5-foot-tall chocolate Easter egg weighing some 550 pounds.
L'Osservatore Romano AP

In Italy, there are no Easter egg hunts, no marshmallow Peeps and definitely no jelly beans.

Instead, there are chocolate eggs — massive, elaborately decorated, beautifully wrapped chocolate Easter eggs that now fill shop windows across the country. The sweet treats are considered Italians' food gift of choice at this time of year. And each one comes with a surprise tucked inside.

"You want something that really gives a big effect," says Rome-based food writer Elizabeth Minchilli.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Hiding In Plain Sight

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

On-air challenge: You will be given some words. For each one, you provide a four-letter word that can follow the first to complete a familiar two-word phrase. The four letters of the second word can always be found inside the first word. For example, given "personal," the answer would be "loan."

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Author Interviews
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

In A New Memoir, Maya Angelou Recalls How A 'Lady' Became 'Mom'

Maya Angelou and her mother, Vivian Baxter. Although it took years, Angelou and her mother eventually developed a close and loving relationship.
Random House

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 1:40 pm

Maya Angelou has lived a life so expansive and extraordinary that, even after seven autobiographies, she still has more stories to tell. Her latest book, Mom & Me & Mom, explores her relationship with her mother, Vivian Baxter. When Angelou was young, Baxter sent Angelou and her brother away to be raised by their grandmother; years later, she called them back to live with her again, the start of a sometimes fractious but eventually loving relationship.

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Movie Interviews
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

Why Actor James McAvoy Almost Turned Down 'Trance'

In director Danny Boyle's upcoming film Trance, James McAvoy plays Simon, an art auctioneer whose gambling problem pushes him into an awkward relationship with a group of criminals.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

Scottish actor James McAvoy stars in the new heist thriller Trance. It's the latest film from director Danny Boyle, best known for the Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire.

In Trance, McAvoy plays Simon, an art auctioneer with a gambling problem who ends up mixed in with a gang of criminals.

Although the 33-year-old has been dying to work with Boyle for years, he says he almost didn't take the part.

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Author Interviews
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

'Game Over': Mixing Sports and Politics

The New Press

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:27 pm

The uneasy confluence of sports and politics is featured in a new book by The Nation's Dave Zirin, called Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down.

During the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War, athletes routinely made their political views known. In some cases, that isolated them from sports fans. In other cases, their influence led to real change. But in recent decades, those voices fell silent. Some say the siren's call of endorsement deals made them gun-shy about speaking their minds.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

The Movie Saoirse Ronan Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Alicia Silverstone (from left), Brittany Murphy and Stacey Dash in Clueless.
Elliot Marks AP

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Movies
8:34 am
Sat March 30, 2013

The 'Trailer Trash' That's Sent Us To The Cinema

Host Scott Simon speaks with Ian Crouch, web producer for The New Yorker, about tropes in movie trailers throughout the years. Crouch's blog post, "Trailer Trash," was published Friday on The New Yorker's Culture Desk blog.

Theater
6:16 am
Sat March 30, 2013

New York's Living Theater Drops Its Curtains

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 8:34 am

For nearly 70 years, the Living Theater championed some of the most challenging work in New York Theater. It was the original off-Broadway company. But last month, Jon Kalish reports, co-founder Judith Malina shuttered the space she poured all of her money into and moved into an assisted-living home.

Author Interviews
4:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

'Life After Life,' The Many Deaths And Do-Overs Of Ursula Todd

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 8:34 am

One night in 1910, a little girl is born during a snowstorm in the English countryside. The umbilical cord is wrapped around the baby's neck; she turns blue and gasps for life. The doctor can't make it through the snow, and the little girl dies.

That same little girl is born on another version of that night in 1910, but this time the doctor makes it through the storm, delivers the baby and stays for breakfast.

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Author Interviews
4:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

David Sheff On Addiction: Prevention, Treatment And Staying 'Clean'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 1:43 pm

David Sheff wrote a book in 2008 that became a kind of landmark. Beautiful Boy was a painful, personal story of the battle he tried to fight with and alongside his son, Nic, who was addicted to methamphetamines. The book became an international best-seller and made David Sheff one of the country's most prominent voices on addiction — not as a doctor, an addict or an academic expert, but as a father.

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Author Interviews
4:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

The 'Unsinkable' Debbie Reynolds Looks Back On Life, Love And A Boozy Busby Berkeley

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:29 am

Debbie Reynolds has been in show business for more than 60 years — beginning as an ingenue chirping a novelty tune called "Aba Daba Honeymoon" in one of her first films, a Jane Powell/Ricardo Montalban vehicle called Two Weeks With Love. That was 1950. Today, she's indisputably a grand dame of show business, working with names like Matt Damon and Michael Douglas.

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Arts & Life
4:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

A Fossilized Confection Baked For Easter 1807

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 8:34 am

A British couple believes they've come across a hot cross bun that was baked more than 200 years ago. Host Scott Simon explains.

Theater
3:42 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

'Testament Of Mary': A Familiar Mother, In First Person

Fiona Shaw rehearses for her role as the Virgin Mary in The Testament of Mary. Irish novelist Colm Toibin's one-woman play opens April 22 at Broadway's Walter Kerr Theater.
Hugo Glendinning

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 5:55 pm

How do you play a character who's been depicted more than nearly any other character in all of Western civilization?

That's the challenge currently facing Irish actress Fiona Shaw, who in the past has played such well-known fictional characters as Harry Potter's Petunia Dursley and Marnie Stonebrook on HBO's True Blood -- not to mention titanic classical roles from Euripides' Medea to Shakespeare's Richard II.

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Movie Reviews
3:29 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

A Film So Sumptuous, 'Renoir' Himself Might Have Helped Out

Jean (Vincent Rottiers) assists his ailing father, the artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), in his studio on the French Riviera.
Samuel Goldwyn Films

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 5:55 pm

The year is 1915. A beautiful young woman bicycling through sun-dappled woods passes under an effigy of a German soldier and seems entirely unfazed. World War I is raging elsewhere in Europe, but here on the French Riviera life is serene.

The cyclist, Andree, is on her way to pose for an elderly Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), whom she somewhat startles by claiming to be an artist herself.

"An artist," wonders the great man.

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Architecture
3:22 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Self-Taught Architect Behind Brooklyn's 'Broken Angel' Faces Eviction

Over the past three decades, Arthur and Cynthia Wood turned their four-story home into a work of art. They purchased the brick tenement at the intersection of Downing and Quincy streets in 1979 for $2,100 in cash.
Courtesy of Chris Wood

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 5:55 pm

A New York landmark of sorts is in danger of being wiped off the map. The building now known as Broken Angel was an ordinary 19th-century brick structure until self-taught artist and sculptor Arthur Wood started building on top of it in the late 1970s. Now Wood faces eviction from his own masterpiece — a towering structure that looks like a cathedral built out of salvaged junk.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

R&B Singer Aaron Neville Plays Not My Job

Courtesy of Aaron Neville

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:15 am

There might be a prettier voice in the world than Aaron Neville's, but if there is, it belongs to a bird, and there's no way that bird looks as good in a leather jacket. Neville has sung duets with Aretha Franklin, has a bridge in India named after him, and has had his voice prescribed by British social workers to help people with depression. He has a new album called My True Story.

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Movie Reviews
11:15 am
Fri March 29, 2013

A Film So 'Wrong' It's Almost ... Um ... Wha???

The bewildered Dolph (Jack Plotnick) is just as baffled about the bizarro plot of Wrong as most of the audience will be. He's searching for his missing dog — or something like that.
Drafthouse Films

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:48 am

Writer-director Quentin Dupieux's last film came with its own viewing guide, a warning in the form of a to-the-camera prologue given by a flippant floppy-haired police officer: "All great films, without exception, contain an important element of no reason."

The cop's argument is too sweeping, and its examples too transparently nonsensical, to be taken seriously: Why is E.T. brown? For no reason. Why did the guy in The Pianist have to hide? For no reason!

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Food
10:39 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Spicing Up Your Easter Or Passover Meal

Penny de los Santos Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 10:02 pm

Traditional Passover and Easter food is sacred to some. But for observers looking for something different than the same-old lamb or gefilte fish, chef Pati Jinich has some ideas to spice up your holiday table.

She's the author of a new cookbook, Pati's Mexican Table, and has a PBS show by the same name.

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Monkey See
10:20 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Moody Mysteries And More Punching Bags

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's show, Glen and I are joined not only by our producer Jess Gitner, but also by a new face for PCHH: NPR Books editor Petra Mayer, whom you may very well know as much of the voice of our books team on social media.

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Ask Me Another
8:07 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Who's That Girl? II

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:02 am

Female muses have been glorified in art both old ("O lady myn, that called art Cleo," wrote Chaucer) and new ("Wake up to your girl, for now let's call her Cleopatra," sang Frank Ocean). Guest musician Julian Velard takes popular songs that have a women's name in the title, and substitutes a man's name in its place. Can you name the original lady? After, Velard pays tribute to a famous chanteuse with a cover of "Teenage Dream" by Katy Perry.

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Ask Me Another
8:07 am
Fri March 29, 2013

War [Ugh] What Is It Good For?

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

On our stage right now, we have Adam Herbst and Andy Cohen, ready for our next game. Andy, I hear that you are an aspiring hypnotist.

ANDY COHEN: Stage hypnotist. Yes, I got training last month in Las Vegas.

EISENBERG: I feel sleepy right now.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Adam, I love that your least favorite word is iconic.

ADAM HERBST: This is true.

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Ask Me Another
8:07 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Character Voices

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

All right, ready or not, we have our next two contestants. We have Liz Kash Stroppel and Barri Trott settling behind their puzzle podiums. Welcome to both of you. Liz, do you have a favorite cartoon character?

LIZ KASH STROPPEL: Let's see, I think Jessica Rabbit.

EISENBERG: Jessica Rabbit, that's a good one, yes.

STROPPEL: Yes.

EISENBERG: How about you, Barri?

BARRI TROTT: I think Wallace and Gromit, it I can do two.

EISENBERG: Sure, Wallace and Gromit. I know, delightful.

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