Arts

New In Paperback
9:19 am
Mon May 6, 2013

May 6-12: An Apocalypse, A Trip To Malawi And Anne Boleyn

Cover of The Lower River

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Books
9:17 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Wendy Williams Dishes Her Own Dirt

Karl Giant

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 1:35 pm

Daytime television talk show host Wendy Williams is known for pushing the envelope and dishing the dirt on celebs. She got her start over 20 years ago, as a radio DJ and host. Williams quickly became known in New York as a "shock jockette" who never bit her tongue.

Her quick humor has made The Wendy Williams Show one of the most popular in daytime talk. But Wendy's road to stardom had its bumps.

On Drug Use

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Monkey See
7:53 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Shut The Door, Have A Suite: 'Mad Men' Steps It Up

Jon Hamm as Don Draper in Mad Men.
Michael Yarish AMC

[CAUTION: This is all about Sunday night's Mad Men. Obviously, if you haven't seen Sunday night's Mad Men and you still intend to, you might hold off.]

It's reductive to conclude that on far too many episodes of Mad Men, nothing happens. Of course something always happens: someone feels something, or learns something, or is locked in a continuous internal struggle with something. A dynamic continues to simmer, a memory comes to the surface, angels and demons battle for somebody's soul.

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Monkey See
6:10 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Armor And Anxiety: Tony Stark Is The New Captain America

Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark in Iron Man 3.
Marvel/Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:37 am

Meet Tony Stark at the opening of Iron Man 3: insanely wealthy, possessed of every toy, and traumatized by an attack on New York that has left him restless, anxious, belligerent, and given to both hunker-down security measures and fate-tempting swagger. He declares his total lack of fear, then builds the fortress walls higher.

Let's step back.

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Book News: Harper Lee Says Literary Agent Exploited Her Health

Harper Lee smiles before receiving the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom at the White House in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Religion
2:08 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Search For Faith In 'Godless' Washington

The National Cathedral in Washington, D.C, is one of the world's largest cathedrals, and the seat of the Episcopal Church.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 2:03 pm

War has brought the act of faith to the forefront for those who occupy the White House. President Lincoln famously issued a call to prayer during the Civil war. Franklin Roosevelt announced D-Day to the nation with a prayer.

Today, President Obama receives a daily spiritual meditation. The man who sends those messages is a Pentecostal minister named Joshua DuBois.

When he first moved to Washington, D.C., DuBois says he had already formed an impression about the spiritual life of the town.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
1:47 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

The Movie Derek Cianfrance Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actors Ray Liotta (from left), Robert De Niro, Paul Sorvino and Joe Pesci in Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas.
Warner Bros. Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 5:20 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
1:43 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Tale From The Delta, Born Of The Blues

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 5:20 pm

Bill Cheng's new novel, Southern Cross the Dog, is deeply rooted in the Mississippi Delta. It follows the story of one boy after he survives the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and spends the next few decades as a refugee, an abandoned orphan and then an itinerant laborer.

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Television
5:45 am
Sun May 5, 2013

Pat Sajak: 'I Didn't See Myself As A Game Show Host'

Wheel of Fortune has been a part of American culture since 1975. The show has been in syndication since 1983 and since then there has only been one host, Pat Sajak. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Sajak about his early years in broadcasting, the military and hosting one the nation's most popular game shows.

You Must Read This
3:54 am
Sun May 5, 2013

A Chatty, Pensive, 'Rude As A Goat's Beard' Child Soldier

A. Igoni Barrett is the author of Love Is Power, Or Something Like That: Stories.

The reign of the child soldier in African literature is over.

Now, in the aftermath of its decline, the props of the regime — as with the downfall of your common blood-and-flesh despot — are being dismantled. The discerning reader has long grown weary of dead and dying stereotypes of the modern African novel: Civil wars. Black magic. Vulture-stalked refugees. In life as in literature, the stranglehold of these banal memes on African narratives is broken.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:24 am
Sun May 5, 2013

Two Last Names For The Price Of One

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 4:39 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today consists of two people, either real or fictional, whose last names are anagrams of each other.

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Food
3:24 am
Sun May 5, 2013

How To Dip Without Breaking The Chip

Claire O'Neill NPR

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:13 am

The Mexican army's May 5 victory in 1862's Battle of Puebla is a pretty small holiday in Mexico. But in the U.S., Cinco de Mayo has grown into a kind of Mexican St. Patrick's Day. So this weekend, in honor of that holiday, thousands of Americans will be dipping tortilla chips into guacamole, and when they do they'll have an important decision to make: how best to dip without breaking the chip.

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Author Interviews
3:24 am
Sun May 5, 2013

Paul Rudnick On His 'Gorgeous' Adventure

Cover of Gorgeous

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 4:38 am

Paul Rudnick has made a name as a playwright, novelist, columnist and screenwriter. Now he's turned his attention to the Young Adult market with a kind of Cinderella story starring a young woman named Becky, who's grown up in a trailer park.

When Becky's mom dies, she discovers a mysterious phone number. Calling it, she receives a mystical offer: A legendary New York fashion designer will make her three dresses, one each in black, white and red, and if she'll only wear them — and do everything he says — she'll become history's most beautiful woman.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:28 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

The Movie Paula Patton Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly in Adam McKay's Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 4:24 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen a Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that actress Paula Patton, whose credits include the films Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, Jumping the Broom and Disconnect (currently in theaters) could watch a million times is the comedy Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.

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The Two-Way
2:54 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

Star Wars Fans 'Use The Fourth' To Celebrate

Fans are celebrating Star Wars Day today, May 4. Here, actor David Prowse (center), who played Darth Vader in the first Star Wars trilogy, poses with costumed fans in France last week.
Thierry Zoccolan AFP/Getty Images

Today is May 4, unofficially known as Star Wars Day — seemingly for the lone reason that it presents an opportunity for people to tell one another, "May the Fourth be with you." But fans of the George Lucas films are also using the day as an excuse to break out costumes and photos, and generally let their Jedi flag fly.

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Sports
10:07 am
Sat May 4, 2013

A 'Decadent And Depraved' Derby With Hunter S. Thompson

When illustrator Ralph Steadman accepted an assignment with writer Hunter S. Thompson at the Kentucky Derby, he never imagined the weekend that would ensue. Here, Steadman depicts the race's winner, a colt named Dust Commander.
Ralph Steadman

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 4:27 pm

In the spring of 1970, a British illustrator named Ralph Steadman had just moved to America, hoping to find some work. His first call came from a small literary journal called Scanlan's. It was looking for a cartoonist to send to the Kentucky Derby. Steadman had heard of neither the race nor the writer he was to accompany, a fellow named Hunter S. Thompson.

Steadman hadn't read any of Thompson's work, and he certainly didn't know that the writer had a bit of a drinking tendency, but he agreed to go.

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Author Interviews
5:03 am
Sat May 4, 2013

A Look Inside The Garage: A Q&A With Marc Maron

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 2:23 pm

With his newest book, Attempting Normal, released on April 30, and a TV show, Maron, that premiered on IFC on May 3, comedian Marc Maron is having a busy spring. Maron considers himself primarily a stand-up comic, but he's also an actor, author and host of the popular podcast WTF with Marc Maron. The podcast has a simple premise: Maron interviews another comic. But the resulting product is complex and compelling.

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Movie Interviews
3:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

'The Great Gatsby': Retold Again, With A Distinct Treatment

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
3:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Please Don't Delete This Interview About Spam

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:53 am

Open up your email on any given morning and you might get two or three notes from friends — and twice as many from people trying to sell you energy pills, offshore real estate or virility enhancers.

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Author Interviews
3:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

'Fat' Dad Jim Gaffigan On Kids, Comedy And Apartment Living

Jim Gaffigan is an American stand-up comedian.
Nigel Parry Crown Archetype

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:53 am

Jim Gaffigan is outnumbered. The comedian and actor lives with his wife, Jeannie Noth Gaffigan, and five children — that's not a typo — in a two-bedroom apartment in lower Manhattan.

It's a neighborhood that quite proudly abounds with hipsters, swingers, adults-only shops, men in high heels, and people who mutter to themselves on the street. But nothing may attract more surprise in the neighborhood than a Midwestern couple and their five children.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
1:53 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Not My Job: Steve Martin Takes A Quiz About Boring People

Jason Merritt Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:56 am

Steve Martin is a comedian, a playwright, an author, an art collector, an actor, a Grammy-winning banjo player, a composer and, as we all know, a "wild and crazy guy."

So we've decided to ask him three questions about the most mundane and dull guys we could find: the speakers at London's Boring Conference, which we read about in the Wall Street Journal.

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Author Interviews
12:03 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Burt Bacharach: 'Never Be Afraid Of Something That You Can Whistle'

Burt Bacharach has just released a memoir, Anyone Who Had a Heart.
Olaf Heine HarperCollins

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 8:25 am

Burt Bacharach has written huge hit songs, each recognizable after just a couple of notes: "Alfie," "What the World Needs Now," "That's What Friends Are For" — the list goes on. He's written 73 Top 40 hits, along with musical comedies and other collaborations. He's won Oscars and the Gershwin Prize. His songs are often poised on the edge between poignancy and joy, or sometimes the reverse.

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Three-Minute Fiction
10:13 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Round 11: Finders Keepers

Karen Russell's debut novel, Swamplandia! was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2012. Her most recent work is a collection of short stories, Vampires in the Lemon Grove.
Michael Lionstar

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 4:30 am

Round 11 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest begins now!

Here's how it works: We ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, so no more than 600 words. Each round, we invite an author to throw out a challenge and help us judge the contest.

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Author Interviews
3:07 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Advice For New Dads From A Veteran Father Of Four

Little, Brown & Company

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Clyde Edgerton is the author of 10 novels, but his latest book is nonfiction — a guide for dads. Papadaddy's Book for New Fathers: Advice to Dads of All Ages opens with a summary of Edgerton's own family situation:

I have a daughter, Catherine, aged 30. I have a 9-year-old son, Nathaniel, a 7-year-old son, Ridley, and a 6-year-old daughter, Truma. I'm 68. The age gap between the younger kids and me is not something I think about much, because I feel physically about like I did when I was 40 — or at least, I think I do. I think I ...

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Code Switch
3:06 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Bollywood's Early Roots In A Silent Film

Dhundiraj Govind Phalke (left), known as the father of Indian cinema, examines a filmstrip.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 8:35 am

Film festivals around the world are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Indian films this year.

Bollywood today is well known for its over-the-top song-and-dance numbers. (Case in point: In the 1998 Hindi film Dil Se, a troupe of dancers gyrate in unison to a love song on top of a moving train.)

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Movie Interviews
2:49 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Riz Ahmed: Shifting Across Identities And Roles

In the new film The Reluctant Fundamentalist, the Pakistani-British actor Riz Ahmed plays Changez, a self-described "lover of America" who moves back to Pakistan to educate activists.
IFC Films

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 1:32 pm

The Reluctant Fundamentalist is the story of one man's struggle with identity and loyalty after 9/11.

The film's title character, Changez, is an ambitious twenty-something who seems to have it all: A Princeton degree, a Wall Street career and a beautiful girlfriend (played by Kate Hudson). But after 9/11, Changez becomes conflicted about where he belongs.

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Movie Reviews
12:55 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

A Modern 'Maisie,' Still Yoked To Absurd Adults

True Blood star Alexander Skarsgard turns in a sensitive performance as a sort of surrogate dad for the poorly parented title character (a restrained Onata Aprile) in What Maisie Knew, a quietly stirring update of the Henry James novel.
JoJo Whilden Millennium Entertainment

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 1:30 pm

By the end of What Maisie Knew, what 6-year-old Maisie knows is the thing everyone in the theater has figured out in the first five minutes: This poor little girl has two of the most horrible movie parents since Faye Dunaway got her hands on a wire hanger.

They fight or are distracted so much that Maisie is often left to her own devices, making herself meals or scrounging for cash to pay for the pizza her parents ordered.

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Arts & Life
10:21 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Hey Teenagers! We Want To Hear Your Stories

Are you the next Radio Diaries teen diarist?
M Mujdat Uzel iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:49 pm

Are you a teenager with a story to tell? NPR and Radio Diaries want to hear it. Write it down, photograph it (and record it if you want) and then submit it to the storytelling site Cowbird.

Beginning in 1996, Radio Diaries gave tape recorders to five teenagers to create audio diaries about their lives. Starting on May 6, All Things Considered will revisit these original diarists, now in their 30s, to document their lives for NPR listeners.

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Unstoppable Learning

Babies and young children are "already about as smart as they could possibly be."
TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 3:00 pm

Why do we put so much effort in making kids think and act like us? In this hour, TED speakers explore the different ways babies and children learn — from the womb, to the playground, to the web.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
8:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Can Schools Exist In The Cloud?

Sugata Mitra at the TED conference in 2013.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 3:21 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unstoppable Learning.

About Sugata Mitra's TEDTalk

After years of offering children self-supervised access to the Web, Sugata Mitra says kids can teach themselves. Mitra continues the conversation from earlier this episode by arguing that self-organized classes are the future of education, and he puts forward a bold vision: to build a school in the cloud.

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