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How To Build A Tech Empire At Age 24

Aug 9, 2015

He may have been dubbed "The Mark Zuckerberg of Accra" by Forbes Africa, but tech entrepreneur Raindolf Owusu has his eyes set on much bigger goals.

Owusu wants to bring the Internet to all Africans — and train the next generation of tech leaders on the continent.

It's a hot and humid day, like there's a thick blanket of air sitting on top of Seoul, when I visit the city's bustling Namdaemun market. The place has everything from live eels to military surplus gear, and I go to a corner with rows and rows of electric fans.

Kim Yong Ho has run an electronics shop here for four decades. His grandchildren are running around. And he says he would be very careful about letting them fall asleep in a room with an electric fan sitting next to them on a desk or the floor.

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Typhoon Soudelor — fresh from hitting Taiwan, where it left a handful dead and millions without electricity — is now ashore in mainland China, where it is expected to push inland before losing steam over the weekend.

At least six people were killed and 101 others injured when Soudelor barreled through Taiwan, according to The Associated Press. Among the dead were an 8-year-old girl and her mother, who were swept out to sea and drowned on Thursday.

An ex-Soviet army officer turned Taliban commander has been found guilty in a federal court in Richmond, Va., on 15 counts related to a 2009 attack on Afghan and U.S. soldiers at Camp Leyza in Afghanistan's Khost province.

Irek Hamidullin, 55, is a former Soviet tank commander who stayed behind in Afghanistan after the Soviet withdrawal in the late 1980s.

Early one morning in June, a Panama hat weaver named Simon Espinal sat down to work at a wooden table in his house in Pile, an obscure village hidden in the hills near Montecristi, in Ecuador's steamy coastal lowlands.

Selecting eight threadlike strands of toquilla straw from a special stock of extraordinarily fine straw he had spent three weeks preparing, he separated them into four matched pairs with which he formed the cruzado — the crossed threads — that is the start of every Panama hat.

And then he began to weave.

In the French port city of Calais, a few thousand people from the Middle East and North Africa live in shabby plastic tents. They've crossed the Mediterranean and traveled through Europe to arrive here.

About two-thirds of these people will try to enter Britain, while the remaining third are applying for asylum in France. In April, the French government said migrants would be tolerated at this site, known as "The Jungle."

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And now for some Friday debate quarterbacking. I'm joined by our regular political commentators, E J Dionne of The Washington Post.

Hey, E J.

E J DIONNE, BYLINE: Good to be with you.

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In Bangladesh today, another well-known secular blogger was murdered. This is the fourth such killing this year. Police say the 40-year-old activist was hacked to death by assailants in his home in the capital Dhaka. NPR's Julie McCarthy has more.

Today there are 7.3 billion people on planet Earth, according to the United Nations.

If you think that's a lot ... just wait.

A new U.N. report forecasts the biggest growth spurt in history. By the year 2030, the report predicts, Earth's population is expected to jump to 8.5 billion. And by the end of the century, the projection is 11.2 billion. That's about 6 percent higher than earlier forecasts.

Sumo Breakfast Of Champions: Bowls And Bowls Of Clay Pot Stew

Aug 7, 2015

At the U.S. Sumo Open on Saturday in Long Beach, Calif., roughly 60 sumo wrestlers from around the world will face off at one of the largest sumo competitions outside Japan.

To the untrained eye, they may look like pudgy giants in underwear shoving each other around a ring. But this is a sport and there's a lot to it. Pros have to master 82 winning techniques, and follow strict training regimens that include weight lifting and flexibility exercises.

Brian "B Flow" Bwembya used to make music for lovers, donning shades and gold chains in music videos and singing "You're the reason for my life, you're the only one I would make my wife" to pretty girls.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From NPR's South America correspondent, Lourdes Garcia-Navarro:

Niloy Chakrabati Neel, a Bangladeshi blogger who used the pen name Niloy Neel to criticize Muslim extremism, was hacked to death by a machete-wielding gang who broke into his apartment Friday. He is the fourth such social media activist to be killed in the South Asian country so far this year.

"They entered his room on the fifth floor and shoved his friend aside and then hacked him to death," Imran H. Sarker, head of the Bangladesh Blogger and Online Activist Network, or BOAN, tells Agence France-Presse.

Here's What Black Lives Matter Looks Like In Canada

Aug 7, 2015

When we're talking about police brutality, issues in Canada aren't on a lot of American's radar. If anything, there's a widespread belief that Canada is some sort of racism-free zone.

But according to many black Canadians, a #BlackLivesMatter movement is badly needed in that country — and it's starting to take shape.

Ball's Back In Your Court, Lava Grillers

Aug 7, 2015
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When President Obama announced a year ago that he was authorizing new military operations in Iraq, he drew sharp limits on that action.

It would only comprise, he said, "targeted airstrikes to protect our American personnel, and a humanitarian effort to help save thousands of Iraqi civilians who are trapped on a mountain without food and water and facing almost certain death."

Airstrikes began the next day to rescue the Yazidi people who were trapped on Iraq's Mount Sinjar.

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Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, who is in line to be Democratic leader when Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada steps down next year, says he will vote against the president's nuclear control deal with Iran.

In a post on Medium, Schumer says after "considerable soul-searching," he has decided he can't support the agreement.

Schumer says among his reservations about the deal is that it does not allow for inspections of Iranian nuclear facilities at any time. He adds:

It goes by many names: Delhi belly. Montezuma's revenge. The Aztec two-step. But doctors use one not-so-glamorous term: traveler's diarrhea.

If you're visiting a place this summer with less than ideal sewage disposal — maybe a resort in Mexico or a village in Rajasthan — chances are your GI tract will give you trouble at least once ... maybe twice ... maybe continuously.

The Defense Department says the wife of a senior leader of the self-proclaimed Islamic State was released into the custody of the Iraqi government today.

Nasrin As'ad Ibrahim, also known as Umm Sayyaf, had been detained by U.S. forces in Irbil, Iraq. She had been there since May 15 when her husband, Abu Sayyaf, was killed by U.S. Special Operations Forces during a raid against the network in Syria.

Physician and epidemiologist Gary Slutkin has worked in more than 20 countries, fighting infectious diseases like cholera, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. After a decade abroad, he returned to the United States in 1994 and found an acute problem here: gun violence. He began to study the issue and saw familiar patterns: "I just said, 'This is behaving exactly like an infectious disease.' This is the same kind of map, same kind of clustering. Someone has picked this up from someone else, and they pass it on to someone else, and pass it on to someone else."

The remains of two Japanese climbers, who disappeared on the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps in 1970, have been found on a glacier at the famed mountain.

Swiss police say that DNA testing has confirmed the remains — found at an altitude of 9,200 feet on the 14,692-foot peak — are Michio Oikawa and Masayuki Kobayashi, 22 and 21, respectively, who were reported missing on Aug. 18, 1970, according to Agence France-Presse.

A small group of U.S.-trained Syrian fighters entered northern Syria late last month and waited for their mission. They were on a base, with American supplies that included heavy machine guns, communications technology and laser pointers for directing airstrikes.

These fighters are, in effect, the elite members of a much bigger rebel group called Division 30. Their mission is to fight the self-declared Islamic State, though there are multiple factions involved in the Syrian civil war.

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