World News

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Minhae Kim didn't check air pollution levels before bringing her one-year-old to Seoul's Yongsan Family Park.

Perhaps she should have. On this day — and on most days this spring — the measures of the most dangerous kind of pollution in Seoul exceed the World Health Organization's recommended limit. And Korea ranks near the very bottom for air quality in Yale University's latest 180-country Environmental Performance Index.

Yamato Tanooka, the boy who was left in the woods in what his parents had thought would be a brief punishment — and who had been missing in northern Japan for six days — has been found, according to local media reports.

"Police say the boy is in relatively good health," according to NHK News. The agency adds that officials are now working to confirm that he's the boy they've been looking for since Saturday.

The federal government is moving to ban virtually all sales of items containing African elephant ivory within the U.S. For a long time it's been illegal to import elephant ivory. This new rule extends the ban to cover ivory that's already here.

Hillary Clinton didn't just take aim at Donald Trump's national security policies in a major speech Thursday. She declared him unfit to negotiate with allies, command U.S. forces or be privy to the nuclear code.

"Americans aren't just electing a president in November — we're choosing our next commander in chief, a person we count on to decide questions of war and peace, life and death," Clinton said in San Diego. "It's not hard to imagine Donald Trump leading us into a war just because someone got under his very thin skin."

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In an old brick mill building in Skowhegan, Maine, production line workers are cutting, stitching and gluing New Balance sneakers. The company calls them lifestyle shoes, better known for their looks than their athletic performance.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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French President Francois Hollande is reportedly considering a state of emergency in his country, after days of heavy rain across western Europe caused major flooding that left thousands of people stranded.

Back in 1947, Alexander John Haddow made a discovery that didn't seem particularly important.

He was part of a team doing research on yellow fever in Uganda, and he identified a new virus that was making a monkey in his lab sick.

He named the virus Zika, after the Zika forest where his lab was located.

At first, Haddow believed only monkeys were affected. It turns out humans could catch the virus, too, but in Uganda, there have been only two documented cases (although that may be because the symptoms are often mild or even nonexistent).

Archaeologists in London have unearthed the oldest handwritten documents in Britain — a collection of notes, bills and contracts dating back nearly 2,000 years.

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Khaled el-Balshy greets a fellow journalist with two kisses on the cheek and a hearty handshake in his office. He has just been released on bail after being charged with harboring fugitives and publishing false news.

Balshy is the undersecretary of the journalists union in Egypt, also called the Press Syndicate. Balshy; the head of the union, Yehia Qalash; and another board member, Gamal Abdel Raheem, are facing trial on Saturday and the prospect of going to prison, as President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi continues a broad crackdown on critics.

The American Green Berets were seated around a long, plywood table at their base when they spotted the Taliban counterattack on their screens.

The burly Americans were working on computers, drinking coffee and munching on chips and peanut butter cookies. Their team leader answered an ever-ringing phone, giving his superiors updates on an Afghan commando mission in the mountains just north of Afghanistan's Kandahar Airfield.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A convoy carrying much-needed aid, including medicine and baby milk, has reached the besieged suburb of Daraya in Syria's capital. Less than a month ago, a convoy was turned away by government forces.

The International Committee of the Red Cross, the United Nations and the Red Crescent — an aid organization active in the Muslim world — coordinated the effort to get supplies to the Damascus suburb.

It's the first delivery of its kind to the town since 2012.

The Red Cross announced the convoy's arrival on Twitter:

Tom Licence has a Ph.D., and he's a garbage man.

When you think of archaeology, you might think of Roman ruins, ancient Egypt or Indiana Jones. But Licence works in the field of "garbology." While some may dig deep down to get to the good stuff — ancient tombs, residences, bones — Licence looks at the top layers, which, where he lives in England, are filled with Victorian-era garbage.

A French ship has detected signals from a flight recorder for EgyptAir MS804, the plane that crashed into the Mediterranean nearly two weeks ago, according to Egyptian officials and a French company.

Egypts Civil Aviation Ministry said Wednesday a ship picked up pings from deep underwater that seemed to be either the data or voice recorder.

A statement from Alseamar confirmed that the ship Laplace picked up a signal Wednesday, less than a day after it started searching for the recorders, The Associated Press reports.

Thai authorities found 40 dead tiger cubs in a freezer during a raid on a Buddhist temple Wednesday.

Authorities say they don't know why the cubs were kept but plan to investigate. The temple, for its part, says the cubs died of natural causes and were preserved by a veterinarian, possibly to prove that the bodies had not been sold on the black market.

The "Tiger Temple" in Kanchanaburi province charged admission and let visitors pose with tigers, The Associated Press reports.

Driving instructor Mohammad al-Hattab, 33, remembers very well when police pulled him over last fall.

"It was a Sunday, about 1:30 p.m.," said Hattab in the office of the al-Jarajwa driving school in Gaza City. "I remember two guys on two motorcycles. They were in civilian clothes. One stopped in front of my car. He started shouting, 'Stop, stop, we are police.'"

Swiss engineer Carl Eduard Gruner first imagined it in 1947: a massive tunnel, unprecedented in length, buried a mile and a half under Switzerland's symbolic Gotthard mountain range.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the misty rain, surrounded by Rio de Janeiro's green hills, police officer Eduardo Dias was buried last week. He was shot, purportedly by gang members, as he was leaving his post inside the favela, or shantytown, where he worked as a community cop.

The killing took place a few hundred feet from the Maracana Stadium, where the opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics will be held on Aug. 5. As family members wept by the graveside, the pastor raised his hands.

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