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As soon as you set foot in any of the refugee camps along the South Sudan border in Uganda, a vast human suffering becomes easily apparent.

Canada Is Full Of Cry(ing) Babies

Apr 5, 2017

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Now over the next 10 minutes or so, we're going to work through some of the biggest stories of this day.

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Murder is on the rise in Mexico. Ten years after the government launched its war on drugs and sent the military to combat cartels, homicides are at levels not seen since the height of that offensive. The violence is widespread, but it remains most prevalent in a few hard-hit towns and cities.

Hugo del Angel says his city, Ecatepec, a sprawling, struggling suburb of nearly 2 million outside Mexico City, is definitely high on that list.

"It's probably one of the three most problematic in the whole country," he says.

Fourteen people were killed and many more injured in Russia's second-largest city. According to Russian authorities, the attack was carried out by a suicide bomber originally from the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan.

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Nathan Hodge of The Wall Street Journal, who gives us an update from St. Petersburg.

The Trump administration will withhold $32.5 million in funding that had been earmarked this current fiscal year for the United Nations' lead agency on family planning and maternal health, known as the United Nations Population Fund or UNFPA.

The administration says it's doing so because it has determined that UNFPA helps to support a Chinese government family planning program that forces people to get abortions and sterilizations. The U.N. agency says that is not the case.

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Just days before President Trump is set to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping, the administration has made a move that has some U.S.-China experts scratching their heads. The Commerce Department has quietly put a notice into the Federal Register stating that the U.S. will review a hot-button issue between the two superpowers.

A powerful South African union federation that had been a key ally of President Jacob Zuma has become the latest group to join the rising calls for him to resign.

"There has never been so much pressure on him to go, from allies and opponents," NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports, adding that Zuma's problems began with the widespread perception that he was mired in corruption scandals.

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET Wednesday

Poisonous chemicals are suspected of augmenting an aerial bombardment of a rebel-held town in Syria's Idlib province Tuesday, with the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights saying at least 20 children were among those who died. The group says the initial death toll of 58 has risen to 72, and that all the victims were civilians.

The attack was reportedly carried out in Khan Shaykhun, a town in northwest Syria that sits about halfway between Homs and Aleppo on the country's main north-south highway.

There's a saying that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Apparently, so is history.

In the case of Poland's new Museum of the Second World War, the beholder is the nationalist government. Run by the populist Law and Justice Party, it has declared the museum an expensive mess that waters down Polish history and should be closed — or at a minimum, revamped. The museum opened March 23 in the northern port city of Gdansk, where World War II began when Germany invaded the city in 1939.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

Russian investigators believe a man suspected of carrying out Monday's explosion on a St. Petersburg subway train died in the attack. The death toll has risen to 14 people, but officials say it could have been far worse, as a second, unexploded device was found at a different metro stop.

The device that detonated on the train was set off by a man "whose remains were found in the third car," says the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation, which is leading the inquiry.

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Let's get something straight up front: Spain and the U.K. are not going to war over Gibraltar.

That, at least, is what politicians from both countries have been carefully asserting since Michael Howard, a former British Conservative party leader, made a not-so-subtle suggestion Sunday that force would be on the table in some recent unpleasantness over the long-disputed peninsula.

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NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Ben Taub about his New Yorker article "The Desperate Journey of a Trafficked Girl." Taub spent several months following a Nigerian teenage girl's route as she, and thousands like her, try to reach Europe, risking death, forced labor and sex work.

Nomadic herders are invading wildlife conservancies in Kenya's Rift Valley in search of pasture for their cattle. That's culminated in violence, as police move in to push the herders out.

But some local farmers say it's more complicated, that the cattle don't belong to the herders but to wealthy politicians, who are storing their wealth in cattle and laundering ill-gotten money through cattle.

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When he testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee last week, former FBI agent Clint Watts described how Russians used armies of Twitter bots to spread fake news using accounts that seem to be Midwestern swing-voter Republicans.

Michael Ignatieff, president and rector of the Central European University in Budapest, talks to NPR's Robert Siegel about the Hungarian government's efforts to shut down the school, which awards diplomas accepted in the U.S. and Hungary.

The Hungarian government is proposing a law that would require that all foreign schools operating in Hungary have a campus in their home country. The Central European University doesn't currently have a campus in the U.S.

Ten people were killed and many more injured after an explosion Monday in Russia's second-largest city, St. Petersburg. The blast at one of the metro stations caused havoc amid the afternoon commute.

No one has claimed responsibility, but Russia's Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev is calling it a terrorist attack.

<em>The Washington Post</em>'s Andrew Roth shares the latest updates.

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The Egyptian president is 1 of 3 world leaders meeting with President Trump this week. The king of Jordan visits the White House on Wednesday, and China's president will be a guest at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida at the end of the week.

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The world is doing a much better job of keeping babies alive long enough to become children, children alive long enough to become teens and teens alive long enough to fully grow up, according to a report in today's JAMA Pediatrics. "I think that the overall highlight of the report is good news," says Dr. Nicholas J.

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