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The Iran nuclear deal includes more surveillance at the country's nuclear facilities, something President Obama says will ensure that Iran does not build a bomb.

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In Athens today, there were protests outside the Greek Parliament as its members debated the country's proposed bailout deal.

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UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Chanting in Greek).

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Back in April when president Obama called the nuclear deal the best way to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, he cited our next guest, Ernest Moniz, as an authority.

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Manuel Santos, from Valencia, Spain, is feeding his daughter, Carmen, a 6-month-old who was born to a surrogate in Thailand.

Father and daughter are in a temporary apartment in Bangkok, accompanied by Santos' husband, Gordon Alan "Bud" Lake III, from New Jersey, and the couple's 2-year-old son, Alvaro, who was born to a surrogate in India.

The boy is creating chaos, dumping toys around the apartment. He's the only one in the family who looks happy today.

Few places are as rich in cycling lore as the Col du Tourmalet, the brutal 6,939-foot pass in the French Pyrenees that has been a mainstay of the Tour de France since 1910. This is where history is written and legends are made.

The Iranian nuclear negotiations were hugely complicated. If you understood them, even vaguely, congratulations.

Now that there's a deal between Iran and six world powers, there's a whole new set of issues to master. Iran is obligated to scale back its nuclear program, inspectors will be poking around to ensure compliance and the international community will have to lift a raft of sanctions.

Here's a primer on what to expect in the next few months:

1. What Happens Next?

Fed up with depressing images of starving children used in the media to portray their home, Africans are taking to Twitter to show off the beauty and diversity of their continent.

A group of young Africans is using the hashtag #TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou to push back on generalizations that people elsewhere may have about their home continent. So far, there have been more than 75,000 tweets using the hashtag since the campaign began on June 23.

The deal between Iran and six world powers is limited to keeping that nation from building a nuclear bomb. But it's inevitable that the agreement, announced Tuesday in Vienna, will have broader consequences and one of them could be a buildup of conventional arms in the Middle East.

As part of the nuclear deal, a United Nations arms embargo on Iran, which was imposed in 2007 in response to the country's nuclear program, will be lifted in five years for most weapons, and in eight years for ballistic missiles.

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And for more now on the Iran nuclear deal, we're joined by Karim Sadjadpour, who's senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment.

Welcome.

KARIM SADJADPOUR: Great to be with you.

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As Dan Charles reported on Monday, yogurt has a way of igniting passions. In his story of arson, the flames were literal.

Once you start looking, it's really not hard to find people — even entire countries — deeply attached to this nourishing and calming food.

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Now reaction from a key Democratic senator. Ben Cardin of Maryland is the ranking minority member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In a statement today, he spoke of Congress's solemn obligation to review this deal.

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She was only 15 minutes late. That's amazing! After all, she is the first lady of the United States. She has a busy schedule. She was scheduled to speak to the Girl Up Leadership Summit at 11:15 a.m. And by 11:27ish she was in the house.

"You all look amazing," Michelle Obama told the 200-plus activists who represent some of the world's 1,000 Girl Up clubs. They'd come to Washington, D.C., to bond, to learn about girls' issues and to lobby Congress.

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Exhausted negotiators reached a deal to curb Iran's nuclear program, and now the sales pitches begin in Washington and Tehran. President Obama framed this as a choice between war and peace.

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NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Scott Peterson, a correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor, about the reaction in Iran to the newly-struck nuclear deal.

India is in the midst of a war of sorts — a war over eggs. To eat them, or not to eat them. Actually, it's more about whether the government should give free eggs to poor, malnourished children.

It all began in late May, when Shivraj Chouhan, the chief minister of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, shot down a proposal to serve eggs in government-run day care centers (anganwadis) in some tribal areas.

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