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For Germans, Friday's working session between President Trump and Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House proved unexpectedly cordial and, at times, odd.

The chancellor, who is usually reserved, looked surprised when Donald Trump greeted her with a kiss on each cheek, a move the president seemed to have picked up from the French during the first state visit by France's president, Emmanuel Macron, earlier this week.

Venezuelans Fleeing To Brazil And Colombia

Apr 28, 2018

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This story was originally published on Oct. 20, 2017, and is being republished with minor changes to update.

When U.S. troops were ambushed in Niger last October, the widespread reaction was surprise: The U.S. has military forces in Niger? What are they doing there?

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET Saturday

At least three Palestinians died Friday, and a fourth died Saturday after being shot the day before, amid violence between protesters and Israeli troops along the Gaza-Israel border, Palestinian officials say. They say hundreds more were injured when Israeli troops opened fire on the demonstrators who rushed a security barrier in the region, seeking to cross into Israel.

The Palestinian Ministry of Health says at least 178 of those casualties came due to the Israeli security forces' use of live ammunition.

Seema heard the children on the upper floors of the house scream "chlorine, chlorine!" Amina says she felt gas hit her lungs. Abu Faisal found himself caught in a yellow-tinged cloud.

These are just some of the testimonies collected by NPR from now former residents of Douma, a town outside the Syrian capital Damascus, who say that on the night of April 7, they endured the terrifying experience of a chemical weapons attack.

Archaeologists discovered the remains of more than 140 children in Peru, children who they believe were sacrificed because of heavy rains.

Their skeletons were found on an excavated site formally known as Huanchaquito-Las Llamas — ground that was controlled by the Chimú Empire some 550 years ago, reported National Geographic in an exclusive published on Thursday.

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The Pentagon has started briefing the families of four soldiers killed in an ambush in Niger last October, and the military acknowledges a series of missteps contributed to the deaths, one family member told NPR.

"I think in any instance where people lose there lives, there were obviously mistakes that were made," said Will Wright, the brother of one of those killed, Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright. Will Wright is himself a combat veteran, having served as a staff sergeant in Afghanistan. He and his family were briefed by military officers on Thursday.

In a day filled with compelling images and stirring rhetoric, Friday's political theater and media spectacle in South Korea had something for just about everyone. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un took historic strides across the border to meet South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Then, he invited Moon to step briefly into the North. Over the course of the day, the two leaders took part in a tree-planting ceremony and met one on one in the Demilitarized Zone; they smiled and embraced, and at the end of their historic summit, announced lofty goals.

Updated at 5:19 p.m. ET

President Trump expressed optimism for upcoming talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, saying of a potential agreement to denuclearize the Korean peninsula "I hope I'm able to do [it] for the world."

A hundred years ago, the world was struck by a nightmare scenario.

World War I was still raging. And then a suspicious disease appeared.

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Comfort Zone.

About Dan Pallotta's TED Talk

Stepping outside of one's comfort zone can happen on different levels. Entrepreneur and humanitarian activist Dan Pallotta says that doing so is not only important for individuals — but for society.

About Dan Pallotta

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Comfort Zone.

About Ann Morgan's TED Talk

In 2012, Ann Morgan set out to read a book from nearly 200 different countries around the world. She describes how that experience challenged her limits and tested her assumptions.

About Ann Morgan

Retired Brig. Gen. Donald C. Bolduc served as commander of the U.S. Army's Special Operations Command Africa from April 2015 to June 2017.

Africa will soon be home to a quarter of the world's population. Unfortunately, the pace of economic development will not sustain its rapid population growth and will exacerbate already high rates of unemployment and poverty, which are key drivers of instability.

That instability is already a problem with ramifications not only for our African partners but also for international allies, U.S. interests and our homeland.

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Our series "Take A Number" looks at problems around the world — and the people trying to solve them — through the lens of a single number. Today's number: 10 — that's the percentage of Hungarians who feel "totally comfortable" having an immigrant as a friend.

Every day at noon, Ibrar Hussein Mirzai hears the cathedral bells as he leaves his intensive Hungarian-language class in the small, leafy town of Fót, just north of Hungary's capital Budapest.

Merkel Visits The U.S.

Apr 27, 2018

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An airstrike this week highlighted the human cost of the war in Yemen. Saudi Arabia is supporting the government against a rebel group. And Saudi bombs struck a wedding, killing over 20 people.

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North and South Korea today followed up symbolic drama with what seemed like serious announcements. North Korea's Kim Jong Un stepped across the line into the south and shook hands with South Korea's Moon Jae-in. That was the symbolism.

It's no secret that Britain has an obesity problem. One official has described childhood obesity in the U.K. as a "national emergency." In an effort to combat the problem, the government has just slapped a new tax on sugar, directly aimed at lowering the consumption of sugary drinks.

In Scotland, that has already had an impact on the country's beloved sugar bomb of a soft drink, Irn Bru.

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The leaders of North and South Korea are making history at the DMZ.

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What exactly makes a woman?

Track and field's world governing body thinks the answer has to do with levels of serum testosterone, at least when it comes to female runners competing in middle-distance races.

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