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Tens of thousands of German residents in Frankfurt are being told to evacuate by Sunday morning for authorities to defuse a World War II-era bomb.

A Frankfurt police spokesperson said as many as 70,000 people could be affected, according to The Local Germany, which would make it Germany's largest evacuation since World War II.

David Tang, Hong Kong-born socialite, entrepreneur, philanthropist and impresario, has died at 63.

The Financial Times — the British paper for which Tang wrote a weekly column — reported his death on Wednesday, writing that Tang died on Tuesday night in a London hospital. Tang had cancer, the paper notes.

Episode 791: Tips From Spies

Aug 30, 2017

Talking to spies is hard! You'll ask an innocuous question and they just clam up. But, after interrogating spies and a spy reporter, we teased out a few bits of advice that you might find useful.

The thing is, real spies don't like car chases and rooftop shootouts. What they want to do is fly below the radar, stay out of trouble, and always have a getaway. But pulling that off takes a lot of training and practice. It means keeping your wits when everyone is panicking, staying cool under pressure, knowing how to size up a complicated problem in a second.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has differed with President Trump over a number of significant foreign policy issues — North Korea, Iran and Qatar, to name a few. But when Tillerson distanced himself from the president on the question of American values — telling Fox News Sunday that the president "speaks for himself" by blaming "both sides" for violence that took place during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. — questions grew over whether he would soon be out of office.

It's a pair of rites we see often at the passing of great authors: first, the tributes from those who loved their books; then, the good-faith effort to find their unfinished works and shepherd them to the bookshelves they never would have found otherwise.

At 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, Fox News went off the air in the U.K. But why its parent company decided to pull the network from Britain's airwaves is the question.

The channel's parent company, 21st Century Fox, said it was a matter of poor ratings.

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Jacob Rees-Mogg set a record for the longest word spoken in the British Parliament in 2012. The Conservative Party lawmaker aimed this hifalutin insult at the European Court of Justice:

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Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, who is Roman Catholic, finally got his chance to meet Pope Francis.

Spicer was at the Vatican over the weekend as part of an annual meeting of the International Catholic Legislators Network.

The nonpartisan group brings together lawmakers from across the globe to discuss the promotion of Christian principles in politics.

Vatican spokesman Greg Burke has confirmed that Spicer attended an audience with the pope on Sunday.

Weeks of flooding across Nepal, Bangladesh and India have killed more than 1,000 people, according to news agencies keeping track of official death tolls.

And while waters are receding in some areas, the monsoon season isn't over. A new round of flooding has brought life to a near standstill in Mumbai, India's financial center and one of the world's most populous cities.

Late summer often brings heavy rain, floods and landslides to the region, with deadly consequences.

When Ecuadorean authorities boarded the Fu Yuan Yu Leng 999 earlier this month off the Galápagos Islands, they had little idea what awaited them.

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Early this morning around 6 local time, people in northern Japan got an unusual wakeup call.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIREN)

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With a reported 50 inches of rainfall, flash flooding and high, murky waters, Hurricane Harvey in Houston has gripped America's attention. But halfway around the world, another flood has wreaked havoc on historic levels. Two weeks ago, record monsoon rains hit parts of Bangladesh, India and Nepal, bringing the worst floods the region has seen in years. Over 1,200 people have been killed and 24 million affected.

Since 2005, the U.S.-based environmental activist group Sea Shepherd has used its ships to disrupt Japan's annual whaling expedition in Antarctic waters.

But this year, Sea Shepherd says it won't send ships because Japanese whalers are using improved technology that helps them avoid the vessels. And the group's founder, Paul Watson, accuses the Australian, New Zealand and U.S. governments of appeasing Japan by not doing more to stop the killing of whales.

Gentrification of neighborhoods can wreak havoc for those most vulnerable to change.

Sure, access to services and amenities rise in a gentrifying neighborhood. That is a good thing. But those amenities won't do you much good if you're forced to move because of skyrocketing housing costs.

That is why neighborhood and housing advocacy groups have spent decades searching for ways to protect longtime residents from the negative effects of gentrification.

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North Korea conducted a missile launch over Japan early Tuesday morning, further ratcheting up tensions in the region.

The incident was announced by South Korean officials who say the missile was launched from Sunan, near North Korea's capital, Pyongyang. Japanese officials say the projectile flew over the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido and landed in the Pacific Ocean.

It was a lovely late summer afternoon at a beach in southern England. Sun, surf and not a cloud in the sky — until the strange "chemical haze" drifted in off the sea, that is. It was at that point the beachgoers found their eyes streaming tears and their throats growing sore, their gag reflex triggering as some began to vomit.

Then, the professionals in hazmat suits showed up.

More than a day later, authorities still aren't exactly sure what happened to people at Birling Gap beach on Sunday.

A German police investigation has found evidence that a former nurse murdered at least 86 people in his care.

"The realization of what we were able to learn is horrifying," Johan Kühme, chief of police in the northern German city of Oldenburg told news outlets, including the The New York Times. "It defies any scope of the imagination."

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The heir to the Red Bull fortune has been dodging Thai police for nearly five years — and Interpol has issued a new alert, calling for member nations to locate him and hand him over to authorities.

No matter where you go in Kenya — from the vast expanses of the Great Rift Valley to the white-sand beaches off the Indian Ocean — one thing is a constant: plastic bags.

They hang off trees and collect along curbs. And in Kibera, a sprawling slum in Nairobi, there are so many of them that they form hills.

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