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It's not what he says, but how he says it.

The clip comes from NPR's interview with President Obama last Thursday. In it, Obama sums up what he considers his critics' argument — and laughs at it.

A version of this story was published Dec. 5, 2012.

Given tea's rap today as both a popular pick-me-up and a health elixir, it's hard to imagine that sipping tea was once thought of as a reckless, suspicious act, linked to revolutionary feminism.

Years ago, when Dorothy Okatch was getting her start as a basketball referee in the Namibian Basketball Federation, a towering player took issue with a foul she called against him.

The player strode up to Okatch, brought his face inches away from hers and yelled about the call. She briefly considered backing away or shouting back. But then Okatch, who stands 5 feet, 6 inches, called a technical foul, the penalty for unsportsmanlike behavior.

It was a memorable call for both Okatch and the player, whom she still referees regularly.

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How do you say goodbye to a country? Well, you could take a cue from Britain's outgoing ambassador to Lebanon.

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Migrants are arriving in record numbers in Greece, and two boatloads of men, women and children landed Monday on the Greek island of Chios in the Aegean Sea.

All Things Considered host Melissa Block has relatives in her extended family on the island. Her husband's cousins have been assisting the migrants, who are arriving via Turkey from Afghanistan and Syria, as they reach the rocky shores.

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In a small house in rural Kenya, a young woman gives birth to a healthy little girl. Before anyone can celebrate, the mother starts bleeding. The woman will die soon if the bleeding doesn't stop.

Luckily, the midwife has a drug in front of her, called oxytocin. It can easily stop the postpartum bleeding and save the women's life. She takes the medication, but nothing happens. It doesn't work.

This story is fictitious. But the scenario is all too common.

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The Middle East has one of the world's fastest growing communities of online video gamers. With a majority of the population younger than 25, demographics drive the market, which was worth an estimated $1.6 billion in 2014. The region's largest market is in Saudi Arabia — where gamers play a lot and spend a lot, say regional game developers.

New Greek Bailout Deal Looms

Aug 10, 2015

Negotiations between Greece and its creditors dragged on overnight as the parties work to reach an agreement that would save the bankrupt country from another loan default. The deal would funnel up to 86 billion euros ($94 billion) to Athens, allowing the Greek government to make a 3.4 billion euro payment to the European Central Bank by the Aug. 20 deadline.

If you fall seriously ill in Poland you can count on good care at a private hospital but should probably steer clear of the public ones.

In Botswana, an otherwise survivable road accident could prove deadly owing to lack of good care. But in some areas of neighboring Namibia there's a decent chance emergency medical personnel can stabilize you.

And if you have a heart attack, your ticker should be in good hands in Sao Paulo.

Close to a 1,000 people made a run for the border this weekend in El Paso, Texas, as part of an international 10K race from the United States into Mexico.

El Paso and Ciudad Juárez lie side by side in the desert within waving distance of each other. Six years ago, many El Pasoans stopped going to Juárez. A vicious drug war that took the lives of more than 10,000 people scared them off. But on Saturday morning, some of that fear melted away.

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Tens of thousands of Koreans are giving up the urban grind for a more bucolic lifestyle. The numbers have exploded just in the last decade. We meet a couple that decided to give up their city ways to start a larva farm. (This piece first aired on Aug. 3, 2015 on All Things Considered.)

Lawmakers and human rights groups have criticized a 2015 State Department report on human trafficking, saying politics may have interfered with the evaluation of countries' human rights records. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Jason Szep of Reuters.

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The Australian government is warning that Vegemite – the salty yeast-based spread that's an iconic staple of the national diet – is being purchased in bulk quantities to produce moonshine in rural indigenous communities where alcohol is banned.

Brewer's yeast is a key ingredient of the dark brown paste, which was first developed as a substitute for Marmite when the supply of the British-made spread in Australia was virtually cut off during World War I.

Typhoon Soudelor, fresh from causing devastation on Taiwan, has left a dozen dead and five missing in mainland China as it caused floods and mudslides even as it ground down to tropical storm status.

The storm made landfall in China's Fujian province late Saturday after causing six deaths in Taiwan and leaving hundreds of thousands there without electricity.

Japan today marked the 70 years since the dropping of the second of two U.S. atomic bombs that helped end World War II in the Pacific.

In the city of Nagasaki, where more than 70,000 people died in the bombing that came after even greater loss of life at the city of Hiroshima, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe restated his country's pledge never to allow nuclear weapons on Japanese soil.

As Japan marks the 70th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of Nagasaki that ended World War II, aging A-bomb survivors are leading the opposition to what they fear is a dangerous return by Japan's government to the militarism that started the war in Asia.

Near ground zero, a bell tolled at 11:02 a.m., marking the moment that a US plutonium bomb obliterated this city and killed some 70,000 people.

With Prime Minister Shinzo Abe sitting in the audience, Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue addressed a memorial service. He said Japan should not abandon its pacifist constitution.

Africa will mark one year without polio on Tuesday. The last case was in Somalia in 2014.

But last week, a polio vaccination campaign in Kenya faced an unlikely opponent: The country's Conference of Catholic Bishops declared a boycott of the World Health Organization's vaccination campaign, saying they needed to "test" whether ingredients contain a derivative of estrogen. Dr. Wahome Ngare of the Kenyan Catholic Doctor's Association alleged that the presence of the female hormone could sterilize children.

Like most medical professionals, it's Dr. Katherine McKenzie's job to evaluate the wounds and scars of the patients who come to her. But unlike most, it's not her job to treat them.

For the past decade, she has worked to verify claims of physical torture by refugees seeking asylum in the U.S.

How To Build A Tech Empire At Age 24

Aug 9, 2015

He may have been dubbed "The Mark Zuckerberg of Accra" by Forbes Africa, but tech entrepreneur Raindolf Owusu has his eyes set on much bigger goals.

Owusu wants to bring the Internet to all Africans — and train the next generation of tech leaders on the continent.

It's a hot and humid day, like there's a thick blanket of air sitting on top of Seoul, when I visit the city's bustling Namdaemun market. The place has everything from live eels to military surplus gear, and I go to a corner with rows and rows of electric fans.

Kim Yong Ho has run an electronics shop here for four decades. His grandchildren are running around. And he says he would be very careful about letting them fall asleep in a room with an electric fan sitting next to them on a desk or the floor.

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