World News

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Brazil is battling a recession, political chaos, high crime and the spreading Zika virus. All these factors seem to be conspiring to drive potential ticket buyers away in advance of the Summer Olympic Games set to open Aug. 5 in Rio de Janeiro.

Hear it in Rio, Kathmandu or Timbuktu — it doesn't matter. A hearty, belly laugh means the same thing on every continent: joy.

But when we laugh with someone else, our chuckles may divulge more than we realize.

Scientists have found that people around the world can tell whether folks are friends or strangers by listening to them laughing together. And the ability transcends culture and language.

After a violent day at the border between Greece and Macedonia, as rain fell on camps filled with tens of thousands of migrants, an uneasy tension permeated both sides of the barbed wire fence. And two things were in abundance: confusion and criticism.

Migrants and refugees stranded at a Greek camp on the closed border stormed a fence on Sunday and were repulsed by Macedonian police.

President Obama has cut a nuclear deal with Iran. He has scolded North Korea for its provocative nuclear tests. And he has hosted a series of global nuclear security summits in Washington.

Now there's speculation the president may visit Hiroshima, Japan, site of the world's first atomic bombing, which hastened the end of World War II more than 70 years ago.

Secretary of State John Kerry visited the Peace Memorial in Hiroshima on Monday, making him the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit the site since the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb there at the end of World War II.

Kerry didn't apologize for the U.S. attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, as some Japanese activists have pushed for. He did honor those who died in the bombings, NPR's Elise Hu reports.

On the visit, Kerry toured the peace museum and laid a wreath at the monument to the attack, The Associated Press reports.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In democratic South Korea, you're free to express your opinion on most topics — except North Korea. Korean-American Shin Eun-mi learned that lesson the hard way. After a few tourist trips to the North, she shared her observations of North Korean people, landscape and culture in two books and several speeches in the South.

"I said, 'North Korean beer tastes good, and the water of North Korean rivers is clean,' " Shin said in a phone interview.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Manny Pacquiao defeated rival boxer Timothy Bradley Jr. in Las Vegas on Saturday night, in what the star has called the final fight of his career.

Pacquiao, who is Filipino, won the welterweight fight by unanimous decision from the judges. The fight at the MGM Grand was Pacquiao's first since his loss to Floyd Mayweather last May in what had been dubbed the "fight of the century."

The men behind last month's deadly attacks in Brussels had intended to strike Paris instead — but shifted their target as Belgian authorities closed in on them, Belgian investigators say.

Teri Schultz tells NPR's Newscast unit that this information emerged after authorities arrested and interrogated key suspects.

Here's more from Teri:

A fire swept through a packed Hindu temple in the southern state of Kerala, India, during a fireworks display early Sunday, killing more than 100 people.

At least 200 other people were injured, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from New Delhi.

She tells our Newscast unit that, as army and naval personnel mobilize to aid local medical teams, authorities are starting to investigate what caused the explosion at the temple in the town of Paravoor:

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In Brazil, one of the biggest challenges to dealing with the Zika crisis is logistics.

The South American country has bad infrastructure, unequal access to health care — and it's huge. It's difficult for a mom with a microcephalic baby who lives in the countryside, hours away from specialists, to get the help she needs.

But one doctor has developed a system that could revolutionize medicine in Brazil — and has already helped tens of thousands of babies.

It takes a village to move a dog.

In the past seven years, my family and I have moved to three continents: from Maryland to the Kenyan highlands in Nairobi then on to Kathmandu in Nepal's Himalayas and, most recently, to Ankara in Turkey's central Anatolian steppe. We've repeatedly packed our worldly belongings in a 40-foot-long container and then said goodbye for months as they've traveled by sea via multiple ports and then overland by truck to our next destination.

A massive fire broke out during a fireworks display in a Hindu temple in south India early Sunday, killing more than 100 people and injuring at least 200 others, officials said.

The fire started when a spark from the unauthorized fireworks show ignited a separate batch of fireworks that were being stored at the Puttingal temple complex in Paravoor village, a few hours north of Kerala's state capital of Thiruvananthapuram, said Chief Minister Oommen Chandy, the state's top elected official.

The headquarters for the U.S. military's longest war isn't at the Pentagon. It's here at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, a modest brick building in suburban Washington.

Like most military campaigns, this one requires volunteers. Their mission is to place a bare arm atop a mug of malaria-infected mosquitoes and sit still while the parasites enjoy a feast. The volunteers will get malaria, and this allows the military to see how humans respond to treatment.

Attacks on the airport and a metro station in Brussels, Belgium on March 22 killed 32 people and wounded more than 300.

Including three dead attackers, the total number of dead stands at 35. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State.

Here's what we know about the men suspected of carrying out the bombings:

Ibrahim el-Bakraoui

Based on fingerprints, police identified Ibrahim el-Bakraoui and his brother Khalid as two suspected suicide bombers the day after the attacks.

Belgium's federal prosecutors say Mohamed Abrini, who was arrested Friday in connection with the Paris attacks last November, has admitted that he is the man seen in surveillance footage with two suicide bombers who attacked a Brussels airport last month.

"We confronted him with the video evidence prepared by our special unit," a spokesperson for the federal prosecutors' office tells Reuters. "He had to admit it was him."

Austrian officials say the government will attempt to seize the house where Adolf Hitler was born. The Austrian government, which rents it now, has tried for years to purchase the property from its current owner.

"The aim is to prevent the property from falling into the hands of neo-Nazis," Kerry Skyring in Vienna tells NPR's Newscast unit. "Now, the interior ministry says the only way to ensure it does not fall into the wrong hands is to requisition it."

Austrian officials say the government will attempt to seize the house where Adolf Hitler was born. The Austrian government, which rents it now, has tried for years to purchase the property from its current owner.

"The aim is to prevent the property from falling into the hands of neo-Nazis," Kerry Skyring in Vienna tells NPR's Newscast unit. "Now, the interior ministry says the only way to ensure it does not fall into the wrong hands is to requisition it."

"Well, it's not been a great week," British Prime Minister David Cameron said at his party's spring forum on Saturday, after the leaked Panama Papers revealed that his late father ran an offshore fund. "I could have handled this better. I know there are lessons to learn, and I will learn them."

Meanwhile, hundreds of protesters calling for Cameron's resignation rallied near his residence, 10 Downing Street.

Larry Miller in London tells NPR's Newscast unit how this escalated:

North Korea claims that it has conducted a successful test of an engine for an intercontinental ballistic missile, which it says would boost its ability to carry out a nuclear attack on the U.S.

It's not possible to verify the claim, which follows a series of weapons tests from the isolated nation.

On a small Israeli military base at Nahal Oz, next to the Gaza border, there's a windowless room where soldiers peer 24 hours a day at video screens. They're watching live footage from cameras monitoring the Gaza Strip, controlled by the militant group Hamas.

Soldiers see a lot – a damaged home getting slowly repaired after the 2014 war, donkeys guided by farmers, suspected Hamas militants on motorcycles. But they can't see underground, where tunnels beneath the border may pose the biggest threat to Israel here.

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