World News

Parallels
3:40 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico

Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26.
Miguel Tovar/STF LatinContent/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 5:04 pm

On the second story of the municipal palace in Iguala, Mexico, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca occupied the large corner office. His wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda, head of the city's family welfare department, occupied the one right next door. From there, residents say, the two ruthlessly ruled over this city of 150,000 in the southern state of Guerrero. A national newspaper dubbed the duo the "imperial couple."

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Goats and Soda
2:44 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

A Day For Global Girls Gets People Talking, But Then What?

High School students participate in a rally for the International Day of the Girl Child in Ahmedabad, India.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 3:14 pm

Tomorrow marks the third International Day of the Girl Child, designated by the U.N. to highlight the need to create a better world for adolescent girls.

It's a day when activists ramp up efforts to make the public aware of issues like child marriage, violence against girls and the lack of access to education. It's also a time for activists to push world leaders to make commitments — financial or policy-wise — to end those problems.

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Goats and Soda
2:28 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

A Liberian Doctor Comes Up With His Own Ebola Regimen

Dr. Gabriel Logan is one of two doctors at the Bomi county hospital, which serves a county of 85,000 people. In a desperate attempt to save Ebola patients, he started experimenting with an HIV drug to treat them.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 4:43 pm

Dr. Gabriel Logan is a bundle of energy. Wearing a yellow dress shirt untucked from his slacks, he races around the Liberian government hospital compound in Tubmanburg, north of the capital, Monrovia.

He also moves fast on the medical front, experimenting with his own idea of treatment for Ebola patients.

Back in July this hospital, which was the main medical facility for the region, was closed after 10 of the staffers got sick with Ebola.

"We sent them to Monrovia," he says. Of the 10, only one survived.

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Around the Nation
2:05 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Minnesota's Liberian Immigrants Fear Stigma From Ebola

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 4:43 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
2:05 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Nobel Peace Prize Winners Share Connection In Advocating For Children

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 4:43 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:05 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

U.N. Envoy To Syria Pleads For Action To Save Kobani

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 4:43 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
12:27 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Porridge Aficionados Vie To Make Theirs The Breakfast Of Champions

Definitely not traditional: two colorful takes on porridge, from Friday's London Porridge Championships.
Dai Williams Courtesy of the National Porridge Championship

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 8:19 am

Dr. Samuel Johnson's dictionary once summarily dismissed porridge, defining oats as a "grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people."

That was in the 1700s. These days, porridge is seen as more cool than gruel. Today is World Porridge Day — and to celebrate, London hosted its own porridge-making competition.

"Most people think of porridge as a winter dish, and a richer, heavier dish. But I do think it's coming back in vogue. In the last 10 years, it's risen in profile," says Toral Shah, a competitor at Friday morning's event.

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Turkey Agrees To Train, Equip Moderate Syrian Opposition

Turkey has agreed to train and equip a moderate opposition in Syria to help battle the self-declared Islamic State, the U.S. State Department says.

"There will be a planning team traveling to Ankara next week to continue planning that through military channels," spokeswoman Marie Harf told reporters, describing a visit to Turkey by two senior U.S. officials.

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Ebola Joke Triggers Passenger's Removal From US Airways Flight

Hazmat team removes passenger from US Airways flight after joke about Ebola.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 10:57 am

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

Call it a sign of the times: An airline passenger sneezes, makes a joke about Ebola and is quickly escorted from the plane by hazmat-suited personnel.

That's what reportedly happened aboard a US Airways flight that had landed in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, shortly after arriving from Philadelphia on Wednesday.

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Goats and Soda
7:14 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Breaking The Chains That Bind The Mentally Ill

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 11:48 am

Love, respect, integration into communities, work, housing, food and clean water: That's what mentally ill people, like all human beings, need. Instead, in many parts of the developing world, people with mental illness are chained, nearly starved and even locked in a cage with a wild animal like a hyena to scare the demons out of them.

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Asia
3:21 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Pakistani Teen Shares Nobel Peace Prize

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:53 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Gaza Donors Want Assurances Cycle Of War Is Broken

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
2:53 am
Fri October 10, 2014

101st Airborne Switches Gears; Prepares To Fight Ebola

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:05 am

Copyright 2014 Nashville Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wpln.org/.

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Goats and Soda
3:16 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Three Forlorn Presidents Bring Ebola Wish List To The World Bank

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visited West Point in August, when the impoverished neighborhood was quarantined to prevent the spread of Ebola.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 4:28 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is a "tragedy not seen in modern times," said Sierra Leone's president Ernest Bai Koroma.

At the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank on Thursday, Koroma and the presidents of Guinea and Liberia are pleading with the international community for help battling the Ebola epidemic. In the three hardest-hit countries, the virus has already killed nearly 4,000 people.

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Asia
3:16 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Where Is North Korea's Leader?

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:27 pm

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Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Where is Kim? Speculation is swirling over the whereabouts of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The young leader hasn't been seen in public for five weeks. So what does that absence mean?

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Goats and Soda
2:24 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Gangs Can't Stop Colombia's Butterflies From Rescuing Women In Need

Three Butterflies flew to Geneva to accept a humanitarian award: Maritza Asprilla Cruz (from left), Gloria Amparo, Mery Medina.
Juan Arredondo Courtesy of UNHCR

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 2:09 pm

They call themselves "the Butterflies."

And that's not just wishful thinking.

When Gloria Amparo, Maritza Asprilla Cruz and Mery Medina sweep into NPR's bureau in central London, they are indeed as beautiful as butterflies: bright clothing, big beaming smiles. They look around in wonder at the newsroom spread out before them, laughing and joking as I make them a cup of tea.

Yet these are women who've led tough lives — born into Colombian society, where violence and abuse are commonplace.

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Middle East
2:23 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Kobani Kurdish Leader Appeals To Western Governments For Help

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:23 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

For Turkey, Aiding In Kobani Fight Is Complicated

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
2:23 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

A Surprising Tie That Binds Hong Kong's Protest Leaders: Faith

A student prays in front of a temporary altar during a rally outside government headquarters in Hong Kong on Sept. 24.
Bobby Yip Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 7:45 pm

Tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong in the past two weeks, demanding democracy and grabbing global attention.

Many threads have run through the protests, including one that might seem surprising: faith. Many of the leaders are Christian, and some cite faith as an inspiration.

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Monkey See
10:59 am
Thu October 9, 2014

The Indian Film Scene Diversifies, Even As Bollywood Dominates

M Cream, written and co-directed by Agneya Singh, won Best Feature Film at the Rhode Island International Film Festival.
Courtesy of the filmmaker

A 14-year-old girl fights to escape the horrors of the sex trade. A young man from a dysfunctional criminal family dreams of escape, but falls victim to the corruption that surrounds him and his own predisposition for violence.

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The Salt
10:53 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Smen Is Morocco's Funky Fermented Butter That Lasts For Years

That lactic acid is the very thing that gives smen its blue cheese-like scent, and it's what keeps it from going rancid.
Alex Schmidt for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 12:56 pm

If you get a hankering for cheese in the western Maghreb, you may be stuck with an (imported) Laughing Cow triangle wrapped in tinfoil.

Morocco doesn't have much of a dairy tradition, but there's one exception that dates back centuries: It's called smen, and it's a stinky, fermented butter made from sheep, goat or cow milk.

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Parallels
10:14 am
Thu October 9, 2014

The War With No Name

Smoke rises after a U.S.-led airstrike in the Syrian town of Kobani on Wednesday. The Kurdish border town has been fiercely contested in a three-week assault.
Umit Bektas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 11:24 am

The U.S. has been bombing the Islamic State for two months now, and several developments stand out: The extremists are still on the offensive, the U.S. is struggling to find partners on the ground, and for the first time in a quarter-century, a major U.S. military intervention lacks a formal name.

When President Obama launched the aerial campaign in August against the so-called Islamic State in Iraq, followed a month later with similar strikes in Syria, it carried the expectation that it could grind on for years.

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Where In The World Is Kim Jong Un?

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visits Breeding Station No. 621 of the Korean People's Army on Aug. 21. He hasn't been seen in public since Sept. 3.
KCNA Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 12:47 pm

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hasn't been seen in public in more than a month, leading to speculation that he might have been deposed or is merely indisposed. For now, though, Western and South Korean officials are awaiting a Friday event to mark the 69th anniversary of the North's ruling Workers' Party to see if Kim makes an appearance.

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Goats and Soda
3:44 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Fond Memories Of Ebola Victim Eric Duncan, Anger Over His Death

The home of Marthalene Williams, the Ebola-stricken woman aided by Thomas Eric Duncan. A man on the porch, who appeared to be in the late stages of Ebola, informed our photographer that he'd been to a hospital but was told to return home and quarantine himself.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 7:13 am

He liked to joke around with his neighbors. And he always gave them a helping hand. The neighbors that Thomas Eric Duncan's generous spirit is what cost him his life.

Duncan, 42, was the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States and the first to die of the disease on American soil. He likely contracted the disease in Liberia when he carried a pregnant woman, sick with Ebola, into her house after no clinic would admit her.

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NPR Story
3:44 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Doctors Without Borders Changed The Way We Heal The World

A health worker for Doctors Without Borders checks patients at a mobile clinic in the village of Zere in the Central African Republic.
Ton Koene Courtesy of MSF

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 2:35 pm

All day long, forklifts fill departing cargo trucks at a Doctors Without Borders distribution center not far from the Bordeaux airport. From here, the humanitarian supplies make their way to some of the most miserable spots on the planet.

The 16,744-square-yard warehouse is stocked with everything from tuberculosis kits to tires. It looks like a humanitarian Ikea. Specially marked boxes are being packed with medicines, supplies and contamination suits. These "Ebola kits" are on their way to Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone.

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Iraq
3:44 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Distrust Between Kurdish Forces And Arabs May Benefit ISIS

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 7:13 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Parallels
2:01 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Economics, Tensions With Mainlanders Fuel Hong Kong's Protests

Protesters dressed as Chinese Red Guards chant during a May demonstration in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. People from Hong Kong staged a satirical rally to urge Chinese tourists to stay in mainland China. Competition for housing, grades and jobs between the two groups have produced deep tensions.
Anthony Kwan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 8:26 am

If the goal of the protesters who flooded Hong Kong streets in the past couple of weeks can be boiled down to a word, it's "democracy."

But many real-life worries have driven that demand, including economic ones. They range from frustration about jobs and high housing prices to competition — and a culture clash — with mainland Chinese.

Perry Chong, a die-hard protester, was sitting beneath a tent in a nearly abandoned protest zone Wednesday across from the city government headquarters.

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Cities Project
1:04 am
Thu October 9, 2014

In Berlin, Remaking The City Can Rekindle Old Frictions

The broadcast tower at Alexanderplatz looms over the city center. A crossing point of tourists, commuters, shoppers, lovers, artists and bums, Alexanderplatz was rebuilt by the communist authorities of former East Germany in the 1960s. Today, it's a popular gathering place in the reunified city.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 8:54 pm

Berlin is an on-again, off-again capital with a darker history than most cities in Europe.

It served as the epicenter of Hitler's Third Reich and was nearly wiped off the map at the end of the last World War. Berlin was also the flashpoint of the Cold War between the United States and Russia. Their conflict split the city into two, leaving residents on either side cut off from each other in every way imaginable for a generation.

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Parallels
4:03 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

In 'Season Of Mercy,' Will Vatican Rethink Communion For Divorcees?

Faithful hold candles during a vigil prayer in preparation for the synod on the family on Oct. 4, at St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 7:58 am

Some 200 bishops from around the world are gathered at the Vatican for a two-week assembly to discuss issues related to the family, including artificial contraception, premarital sex and ministering gay unions.

But one of the most controversial is a proposal to allow divorced and remarried Catholics to receive Holy Communion — taboo in church doctrine for 2,000 years.

In February, Pope Francis tapped one of his favorite theologians, German Cardinal Walter Kasper, to address a meeting of all the cardinals.

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World
2:58 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

British Imams Speak Out Against Islamic State

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 7:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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