World News

The Two-Way
11:46 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Vatican, Citing 'Delicate Situation,' Rejects Dalai Lama Meeting With Pope

The Dalai Lama, flanked at left by Rome's Mayor Ignazio Marino, arrives at the opening of the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates in Rome on Friday.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 6:48 am

Pope Francis won't meet privately with the Dalai Lama because of a "delicate situation," the Vatican's spokesman said today, in an apparent reference to the Holy See's relations with China.

The Dalai Lama, who is in Rome for a meeting of Nobel Peace Prize winners, had requested a private meeting with the pontiff but said Thursday that the request had been rejected.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Lost Disney Film, Featuring Oswald The Lucky Rabbit, Found In Norway

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit
The Walt Disney Co. AP

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:34 pm

Before Mickey Mouse, there was Oswald the Lucky Rabbit.

Only 25 seconds of Empty Socks, a Walt Disney cartoon featuring Oswald, was thought to exist. But archivists at Norway's National Library conducting an inventory at the library's vault in Mo i Rana, in the Arctic Circle, found an almost complete version of the film.

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Fri December 12, 2014

'Computer Failure' Restricts Airspace Over London

A Eurocontrol map showing the air traffic situation over Europe on Friday.
Eurocontrol

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:34 pm

The airspace over London has been severely restricted because of a "computer failure," Eurocontrol, the European flight safety body, said on Friday.

NPR's Ari Shapiro tells us many flights are expected to be grounded for more than three hours.

"The U.K.'s National Air Traffic Control Center experienced a mid-afternoon power failure," Ari reports. "That forced Heathrow and other airports in the London area to stop all air traffic in and out. Heathrow is Europe's busiest airport, so this will have ripples all across the continent."

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Remembering Michel Du Cille: Photos Of Sorrow And Triumph In Liberia

Ebola survivor Klubo Mulbah (center), a physician assistant who was infected by a patient, celebrates among friends and family on Sept. 24 in Monrovia, Liberia. She was among 15 Liberian patients who recovered from Ebola and were released from the ELWA 2 ebola treatment center.
Michel du Cille The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 11:14 am

Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Michel du Cille died Thursday while on assignment in Liberia for The Washington Post. The newspaper says du Cille collapsed while walking on foot from a village in Liberia's Bong County. He was taken to a hospital but died of an apparent heart attack.

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TED Radio Hour
7:28 am
Fri December 12, 2014

How Can The Rule Of Law Bring "Justness" And Not Just Justice?

"When you grow up poor in America, often you feel very invisible, and like you don't have a voice. Just like many Afghans feel." -Kimberly Motley
James Duncan Davidson James Duncan Davidson/TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Courage.

About Kimberley Motley's TED Talk

Sharing cases from her international legal practice, Kimberley Motley, an American litigator practicing in Afghanistan, shows how a country's own laws can bring both justice and "justness."

About Kimberley Motley

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The Two-Way
7:27 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Climate Sticking Point: Who Cuts And By How Much?

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a speech Thursday at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru. A major sticking point remains over how to divide greenhouse emissions targets.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 12:37 pm

U.N. talks on global warming are wrapping up in Peru, but a divide between rich and poor countries and how to divvy up targets to reduce greenhouse gases is a key sticking point that has remained unresolved.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has acknowledged that the issue is "hard fought and ... complex," but he says it is crucial that the targets be agreed on before next year's summit in Paris. The talks in Peru end today.

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TED Radio Hour
7:06 am
Fri December 12, 2014

What Does It Take To Cover A War?

Reporter Janine di Giovanni shares her stories about war and courage.
Ryan Lash/TED TED

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Courage.

About Janine di Giovanni

Reporter Janine di Giovanni has covered countless wars, including conflict in Bosnia, Sierra Leone and most recently Syria. She tells stories of everyday human courage in conflict zones.

About Janine di Giovanni's TED Talk

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Medical Mystery: Why Did Ebola Pop Up In A Remote Mining District?

The authorities in Sierra Leone are coping with a raging Ebola epidemic in Freetown (above) yet they must also keep constant watch for Ebola hot spots that may crop up in the countryside.
David Gilkey/NPR

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 11:34 am

No cars for the teams seeking Ebola cases. Not enough ambulances to get the sick to the hospital quickly. And no cups for patients to drink from.

That's how bad things have been in a remote Eastern district of Sierra Leone called Kono.

Kono District is a land of towering mountains and muddy diamond mines. It's right next to the region where the Ebola outbreak first started. Still, for a long time, it looked as if the virus was mostly bypassing the place.

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Parallels
3:01 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Kabul Postcard: A Neighborhood In Transition

Afghan laborers work on a road project in Kabul. The city has undertaken a huge project to fix its roads and sewers.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 3:11 pm

As I've been reflecting on the past 2 1/2 years that I've spent in Kabul, it's struck me how much has and hasn't changed. People continue to flood into the city, further straining its infrastructure and services.

But my neighborhood has seen mostly positive changes since I moved to it in 2012.

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Goats and Soda
1:38 am
Fri December 12, 2014

A Liberian Prof Doesn't Like What He's Seeing On The News Blackboard

Samuel Gbarzeki, a professor who's been out of work since schools were suspended in July, gets his news and shares his views at the Daily Talk.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 11:38 am

Samuel Gbarzeki is fed up.

"How can we cope?" he asks.

The university professor, who teaches English to freshmen and sophomores, has been out of work since July when Liberia's government suspended schools because of the Ebola outbreak.

"Ebola is very, very dangerous because it kills and has no boundaries," he says. "But people don't know what to do. They go to bed hungry because jobs have stopped."

The trim man is wearing a tan baseball cap, pressed khaki shorts and a spotless white T-shirt. He will admit to being "something over 60 years old."

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Goats and Soda
1:33 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Liberia's Daily Talk: All The News That Fits On A Blackboard

The Daily Talk uses chalk, photos and Liberian slang to spread the latest news. Editor Alfred Sirleaf set up the blackboard on Monrovia's main thoroughfare.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 11:36 am

Just off Tubman Boulevard — Monrovia's busy main thoroughfare — stands a plywood hut with a large blackboard at the front, in three panels. On them — written in clear, bold white chalk lettering — is a form of newsreel: mini-articles and editorials, as well as graphics and illustrations. The creator of Daily Talk — this Liberian journal with a difference — is Alfred Sirleaf. He's 41 and has been "writing" the news since 2000, three years before the civil war ended.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

After Nut Rumpus, Macadamia Sales Rocket

The aftermath of a Korean Air executive's rage over how a steward presented macadamia nuts in her airline's first-class cabin has had an immediate side effect: sales of the nuts have risen sharply in South Korea.

From The Wall Street Journal:

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Goats and Soda
3:11 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

You Don't Want To Monkey Around With Monkey Malaria

In Southeast Asia, the battle against malaria is growing even more complicated. And it's all because of monkeys, who carry a form of malaria that until a few years ago wasn't a problem for people.

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Asia
2:35 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

Hong Kong Demonstrators Hope End Of Protests Not An End To The Fight

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 4:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
2:35 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

To Fight ISIS, You Have To Understand Its Ideology

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 8:11 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
2:35 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

As Ebola Cases Drop, Liberia's Soccer Fans Are Back In The Zone

At the Arsenal video club, men sit shoulder to shoulder. But some still say it's too dangerous to go in because of Ebola.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 5:13 pm

The sun has set in Liberia's eastern border town of Ganta, and the red dirt roads are humming with motorbikes and boomboxes.

As Ebola starts to lose ground in the West African country, life is slowly returning to normal. Liberia's nightlife, which stalled after officials declared a state of emergency in early August, is gradually picking up. And the hangouts where Liberians pay a small fee to watch soccer are once again packed with fans.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

Postcard From Mexico: Mother Clings To Hope That Students Are Still Alive

Natividad de la Cruz Bartolo shows a picture of her son, Emiliano, one of 43 university students who went missing months ago.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 2:01 pm

The parents of 43 students who went missing more than two months ago in Mexico say they don't believe the government's account of what happened to their loved ones and they will continue to protest and demand justice.

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The Two-Way
9:14 am
Thu December 11, 2014

Fidel Castro Awarded China's Confucius Peace Prize

Fidel Castro, seen here in July, was awarded the Confucius Peace Prize, China's version of the Nobel Prize. He was not on hand to receive the award at a ceremony in Beijing on Tuesday.
Alex Castro AP

Former Cuban leader Fidel Castro has been awarded the Confucius Peace Prize, China's version of the Nobel Prize.

The Global Times, an official newspaper, said Castro, 88, was selected for the prize because he did not use force while dealing with international disputes, especially against the U.S. The newspaper also reported that Castro had made important contributions to eliminating nuclear weapons upon his retirement from the presidency in 2008.

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Goats and Soda
8:47 am
Thu December 11, 2014

Wilbur Goes To Work: New, Very First-Class Video On Village Life

Wilbur Sargunaraj introduces us a barber in his father's home village in India.
Wilbur Sargunaraj for NPR

Originally published on Tue December 23, 2014 10:35 am

Last week, Wilbur Sargunaraj took NPR by storm with not one, but two video premieres. The YouTube star was taking pump baths, drinking Goli soda and — to the dismay of some readers — dunking a chicken in water.

If you missed that wild ride, no worries. Wilbur is back!

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The Two-Way
5:54 am
Thu December 11, 2014

U.S. Says It Has Closed Its Final Detention Center In Afghanistan

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 9:05 am

The United States says that with the closing of its detention center at Bagram, it is no longer holding any prisoners in Afghanistan.

As Reuters puts it, the announcement was made late Wednesday and marks the end of a controversial chapter in U.S. history.

NBC News reports the U.S. gave up custody of its two final prisoners:

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The Two-Way
4:42 am
Thu December 11, 2014

In Hong Kong, Police Clear Final 'Occupy' Protest Site

Hong Kong police arrest lawmaker and pro-democracy activist Leung Kwok-Hung during a sit-in Thursday as police clear the main protest site in the Admiralty district.
Alex Ogle AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 9:02 am

After months of acts of civil disobedience that at some points paralyzed Hong Kong, police cleared the final encampment of what's come to be known as the Umbrella Revolution.

Demonstrators had gathered on the streets of Hong Kong for two months. The protest site at Admiralty was, symbolically, the most important because it was closest to the government offices. In the end, it was also the last one standing.

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Parallels
4:10 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Brazil's Tearful President Praises Report On Abuses Of A Dictatorship

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff begins to cry as she delivers a speech during the final report of the National Truth Commission on Violation of Human Rights during the military dictatorship from 1964-1985 in Brasilia on Wednesday. She is among the thousands who were tortured during that brutal period.
Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Brazil's national truth commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report looking at the abuses committed during that country's military dictatorship, which lasted from 1964 to 1985.

The 2,000-page document details for the first time a history of arbitrary detention, torture, executions and disappearances.

Until now, Brazil has sought to bury its difficult past.

President Dilma Rousseff, who was herself tortured during Brazil's dictatorship period, broke down when she addressed the nation Wednesday. She said the report had fulfilled three important objectives.

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Goats and Soda
3:06 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Boredom On The Border Between Liberia And Guinea

The bright yellow steel truss bridge over St. John's River is the official border crossing between Liberia and Guinea. The Liberian-Guinean border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

They're from the same ethnic group. They speak the same language. And they live on both sides of the Liberia-Guinea divide in the area around Liberia's eastern border city of Ganta, in Nimba County. The families straddle the border, which is not fenced.

"Right over there is the border," says businessman Prince Haward, directing our attention to some rubber farms not too far away. "Those are the rubber farms you find in Guinea."

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Africa
2:16 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Restrictive Government Makes Fighting Sexual Assault Hard In Egypt

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Europe
2:16 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

French Hostage Released After Being Held For 3 Years By Al-Qaida

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A French hostage returned to Paris today after being held for three years by al-Qaida in the Sahara. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports the man's release has revived questions about whether and how governments should deal with hostage takers.

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Latin America
2:16 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Parents Of Missing Mexican Students Don't Believe Official Story

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Parallels
12:44 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

For Yazidi Women, Escaping ISIS Doesn't Mean The Ordeal Is Over

Many Yazidis, like the ones shown here, managed to flee the onslaught of the so-called Islamic State and made their way to relative safety, like this camp near the northern Iraqi border crossing of Zakho. However, some 5,000 Yazidis, many of them women, are still being held hostage by the Islamic State.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Barzan is a young Yazidi man, with sad blue eyes. His mother, five of his sisters and his niece are being held by the so-called Islamic State, taken when the extremist group swept through the Sinjar area of northern Iraq in August.

They are seven of some 5,000 Yazidis still being held by the extremist Sunni group. The Iraqi women are enslaved and sold for sex.

His sixth sister is home with him now. She is just 15 and she was raped. To protect her identity we're only using Barzan's first name.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Alan Rusbridger, Editor Of 'Guardian,' To Step Down

Alan Rusbridger said today that he will step down as editor in chief of the Guardian next summer. Rusbridger oversaw the U.K. newspaper's publication of Edward Snowden's leak of classified material.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:51 pm

Alan Rusbridger, best known in the U.S. for shepherding the Guardian newspaper through its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Edward Snowden's leaks of classified material, will step down as editor in chief of the British newspaper next summer. He said today he will become the chairman of the Scott Trust, which runs the Guardian.

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Goats and Soda
11:51 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Alleged Rape Of Passenger Raises Concerns About How Uber Runs Abroad

After a woman reported that she was raped by an Uber driver in New Delhi, protesters gathered outside a police station.
Anindito Mukherjee Reuters /Landov

Uber is making headlines for all the wrong reasons.

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The Two-Way
9:36 am
Wed December 10, 2014

S. African Prosecutors To Seek Murder Conviction Against Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius is escorted by police officers as he leaves the high court in Pretoria, South Africa, on Oct. 17. A South African judge ruled today that prosecutors can appeal the culpable homicide verdict handed to the athlete for killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.
Themba Hadebe AP

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:21 pm

Oscar Pistorius will see another day in court. A South African judge ruled today that prosecutors can appeal the culpable homicide verdict handed to the athlete earlier this year for killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. He will now face murder charges.

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