World News

Parallels
5:56 am
Thu October 17, 2013

What The World's Newspapers Are Saying

A newsstand in Rome.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 11:02 am

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas' meeting with Pope Francis at the Vatican led the website of Italy's Corriere della Sera newspaper.

At the end of their 25-minute meeting, the pope gave Abbas a pen, which the Palestinian Authority president said he hoped to use "to sign the peace agreement with Israel."

The pope replied: "Hurry, hurry," according to the newspaper.

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The Two-Way
3:08 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Kerry Says He Hopes Syria's Chemical Weapons Are Shipped Out Of Region

Secretary of State John Kerry flies over Afghanistan on Oct. 11. He met with President Hamid Karzai to work out an agreement on U.S. presence in the country.
Jacquelyn Martin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 12:11 pm

Syria's chemical weapons could be consolidated and moved out of the country, Secretary of State John Kerry suggested in an interview with NPR.

Weapons inspectors are still in Syria assessing the country's stockpile and how to destroy it, in accordance with a United Nations Security Council resolution approved in September.

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Business
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Financial Markets React Positively To U.S. Debt Deal

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And news that Washington has finally reached a deal, averting a potentially catastrophic debt default, is drawing a mixed reaction from the rest of the world.

NPR's Philip Reeves, in London, is watching the markets for us.

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: We all know that, at times, the markets can be panicky and irrational. Yet, during this crisis, they held their nerve. Analysts say traders were always pretty confident there would be a last-minute deal. This time, they were right.

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Business
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Grandma Exodus: German Seniors Look To Poland For Care

Two German women chat in the gardens of a senior care home in Berlin. Germany is grappling with a rapidly aging population: By 2050, almost a third of Germans will be 65 years or older, and a growing "Grandma export" trend has set hands wringing.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:43 pm

A handful of German and Polish residents at a nursing home in the Polish mountain town of Szklarska Poreba play a Scrabble-like game using blocks with large letters.

The seniors are tended to by Polish workers who offer a steady supply of smiles, hugs and encouragement.

Leonardo Tegls says such personal attention makes this nursing home, Sun House, special. The 87-year-old Dutch-born immigrant to Germany says he first learned about the Polish nursing home from a TV ad.

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Middle East
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Experts Debate How Best To Remove Syria's Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's go deeper now into one issue Secretary of State John Kerry raised in my interview with him earlier in the program. The secretary, along with his Russian counterpart, got Syria's Bashar al-Assad to agree to hand over his vast store of chemical weapons. Now, Kerry is suggesting those stockpiles be taken out of Syria.

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Environment
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Fuel Efficiency Standards Live On After 1973 Oil Embargo

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This year is the 40th anniversary of the OPEC oil embargo - an event that has shaped our nation's politics and the cars we drive ever since. In 1973, the Arab world decided to cut oil exports to punish nations that supported Israel during its war with Egypt and Syria. While the embargo only lasted several months, it triggered an energy crisis that lasted for years. NPR's Richard Harris reports on the ways we are still feel those effects today.

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Middle East
2:27 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Tech Startups Face All The Usual Challenges And More In Gaza

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:31 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Building an IT startup on the Gaza Strip isn't simple: electricity is sporadic, there is no 3G network. You can sell your product outside Gaza's tightly controlled borders, but it can be difficult to move the money back into Gaza. Nonetheless, half a dozen entrepreneurs from Gaza recently pitched their ideas for consideration in a unique program, one that could catapult their businesses into the global marketplace.

NPR's Emily Harris reports.

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Middle East
2:27 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

No Deal, But Progress, As Iran Nuclear Talks Wrap Up

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:39 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Talks on Iran's nuclear program ended today in Geneva. The outcome? Inconclusive but hopeful. Negotiators agreed that Iran has put forward an important proposal that needs to be fleshed out.

As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports, all eyes turn now to another round of talks early next month.

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The Salt
1:20 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Here's A Reason To Love Disco Again: Stopping Food Waste

Tristram Stuart, founder of Feeding the 5000, is helping to organize several disco soup events across Europe for World Food Day.
Courtesy of Feeding the 5000

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:33 pm

Wednesday is World Food Day, an occasion food activists like to use to call attention to world hunger. With 842 million chronically undernourished people on Earth, it's a problem that hasn't gone away.

This year, activists are trying to make the day a little spicier with pots full of disco soup to highlight the absurd amount of food thrown away that could feed people: one-third of all the food produced every year.

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Parallels
10:51 am
Wed October 16, 2013

As Greenland Seeks Economic Development, Is Uranium The Way?

Workers stand inside the gold mine in Greenland's Nulanaq mountain in 2009. The Danish territory's underground wealth was at the forefront of elections in March. Now, Greenland faces another dilemma: whether to end a zero-tolerance policy on uranium extraction.
Adrian Joachim AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:39 pm

Karen Hanghoj, a scientist with Denmark's Geological Survey, points to the southern tip of Greenland on a colorful map hanging in her office.

"What you can see here in the southern region here is you have a big pink region," she says. "And then within the pink region, you see you have all these little purple dots.

"And what the purple dots are is a later period of rifting. These complexes have these weird chemistries and have these very, very strange minerals in them," she adds.

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The Picture Show
10:41 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Behind The Lens With Prizewinning 'Women Of Vision'

Noor Nisa was pregnant, and her water had just broken. Her husband was determined to get her to the hospital, but his borrowed car broke down, so he went to find another vehicle. Lynsey Addario ended up taking Noor Nisa, her mother, and her husband to the hospital, where she delivered a baby girl.
Lynsey Addario

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:57 am

If you are at all interested in travel or photography, then you probably know National Geographic for the stunning images that take you around the world, introducing you to remarkable cultures and people. Over the past decade, some of the most powerful images in the magazine — and the stories behind them — have been captured by female photojournalists.

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Parallels
10:15 am
Wed October 16, 2013

The 1973 Arab Oil Embargo: The Old Rules No Longer Apply

On Dec. 23, 1973, cars formed a double line at a gas station in New York City. The Arab oil embargo caused gas shortages nationwide and shaped U.S. foreign policy to this day.
Marty Lederhandler AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:31 am

Forty years ago this week, the U.S. was hit by an oil shock that reverberates until this day.

Arab oil producers cut off exports to the U.S. to protest American military support for Israel in its 1973 war with Egypt and Syria. This brought soaring gas prices and long lines at filling stations, and it contributed to a major economic downturn in the U.S.

The embargo made the U.S. feel heavily dependent on Middle Eastern oil, which in turn led the U.S. to focus on instability in that region, which has since included multiple wars and other U.S. military interventions.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Passenger Turboprop Crashes In Laos; All 49 On Board Feared Dead

A Lao Airlines ATR similar to the one that crashed on Wednesday.
Wikipedia Commons

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 11:35 am

A Lao Airlines flight from the capital, Vientiane, crashed into the Mekong River as it was landing. There was no word of survivors among the 49 passengers and crew, The Bangkok Post reports.

The twin-turbo ATR, with 44 passengers and five crew on board, hit the water short of a runway in Pakse, in Champassak province in southern Laos, the newspaper says.

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All Tech Considered
10:04 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Innovation: A Portable Generator Charges Devices With Fire

The FlameStower can charge USB-powered devices with fire.
Courtesy of FlameStower

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:19 pm

Updated Oct. 18 to include comments from BioLite.

In our Weekly Innovation blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form to send it to us.

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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Iran: More Nuclear Talks 'In A Few Weeks'

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. More talks "in a few weeks," he says.
Jason DeCrow AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 2:10 pm

Iran is planning a fresh round of talks on its nuclear program "in a few weeks" after a generally positive first round of multiparty meetings in Geneva aimed at defusing tensions with the West.

Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, commenting on his Facebook page, says the next meeting with the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany would also be held in Geneva.

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Parallels
6:15 am
Wed October 16, 2013

What's News In The Rest Of The World

A newsstand in Paris.
Fred Dufour AFP/Getty Images

The issue of migration into Europe has been in the news lately, and now there's a controversy in France after police seized a teenage girl who was on a school field trip and expelled her along with her family to their native Kosovo.

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Middle East
3:58 am
Wed October 16, 2013

A Graduate Student's Odyssey From Gaza To Indianapolis

Palestinian travelers wait to cross into Egypt at the Rafah crossing terminal in the southern Gaza Strip earlier this month.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:30 am

To get a small sense of Fida'a Abuassi's odyssey, start on June 28, days before the Egyptian coup. She had just returned to her native Gaza Strip via Cairo after spending the year in New York on the U.S. government-sponsored Fulbright student program.

"I came back to Gaza, and then they declared that they will close the border until further notice," she says.

Her goal was to get to Indiana by August to start her master's program at the University of Indianapolis.

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Europe
2:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Protests In Italy Shut Down Funeral For Nazi War Criminal

Anti-fascist demonstrators shout as the hearse carrying the coffin of Nazi war criminal Erich Priebke arrives in Albano Laziale, near Rome, on Tuesday. A Catholic splinter group planned to hold a funeral for Priebke, despite attempts by the local mayor to prevent it.
STR Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 9:50 am

In Italy, protests and clashes erupted Tuesday as a Catholic splinter group prepared to celebrate the funeral of Nazi war criminal Erich Priebke — on the eve of the 70thanniversary of the Nazi roundup of Roman Jews.

Police in riot gear tried to keep groups of ultra-right-wing sympathizers away from citizens enraged over a religious ritual for the man associated with one of the most gruesome Nazi massacres of World War II.

Ultimately, the funeral was suspended.

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Europe
2:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

U.S. Default Would Have Adverse Effect On Europe's Recovery

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:58 am

The possibility of an American default on its debt is huge news across the continent. Europe is barely emerging from its own debt crisis. Europe's recovery rests on demand for its exports and the U.S. is by far the European Union's largest export market.

Parallels
12:56 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Are We Moving To A World With More Online Surveillance?

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was angered by reports that the National Security Agency was spying on her. She has called for giving individual countries greater control over the Internet.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 9:04 am

Many governments around the world have expressed outrage over the National Security Agency's use of the Internet as a spying platform. But the possible response may have an unforeseen consequence: It may actually lead to more online surveillance, according to Internet experts.

Some governments, led most recently by Brazil, have reacted to recent disclosures about NSA surveillance by proposing a redesign of Internet architecture. The goal would be to give governments more control over how the Internet operates within their own borders.

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It's All Politics
4:35 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Shutdown Diary: Hope Turns Into Wall Street Warning

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, the House Budget Committee chairman, walks to a GOP meeting Tuesday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 5:07 pm

Day 15 of the government shutdown started with as much promise as any recently: There was a bipartisan proposal by Senate leaders to reopen the government and raise the debt ceiling.

But any hopes were quickly dashed when leaders of the Republican-controlled House said they would offer a competing proposal because of their dissatisfaction with the Senate effort.

The Senate's Bipartisan Proposal

The Senate agreement between Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., came after weekend negotiations.

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Middle East
3:02 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Not Part Of Talks, Israel Still Tries To Sway Iran Nuclear Talks

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:30 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

In Geneva today, Iran made a proposal to end the standoff over its nuclear program. Western diplomats involved in the talks called the offer useful. While the details have not been made public, two things are clear: Iran hopes a deal will bring relief from crippling economic sanctions, and Israel - which is not a party to the negotiations, but insists it has big stake in the outcome - remains skeptical of Iranian diplomacy.

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Europe
3:02 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Belgians Pretend To Be A Film Crew To Nab Suspected Pirates

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 4:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One of the great conceits of crime fiction is the notion that criminals are often masterminds capable of cleverly outfoxing the cops who are pursuing them. In the real world, the contrary is closer to the truth. Criminals are often not too bright and they are capable of self-defeating stupidities.

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Europe
3:02 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Moscow Suburb Riot Shows Russia's Tense Ties With Migrants

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 4:12 pm

Authorities in Moscow have rounded up more than 1,600 migrant workers after an ethnic riot took place over the weekend. Russian nationalists and soccer hooligans attacked a market area in a gritty industrial suburb of Moscow that's home to many migrant workers from the North Caucasus. The riot broke out after police announced that they were searching for a North Caucasian man suspected in the stabbing death of a young, ethnic Slav man. The situation highlights Russia's immigration problem — the country needs migrant labor, but fears what it perceives as foreign influence.

World
9:55 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Malala Yousafzai: A 'Normal,' Yet Powerful Girl

Malala Yousafzai speaks to NPR's Michel Martin while on tour for her new book, I Am Malala.
Abbey Oldham NPR

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:49 am

"I think Malala is an average girl," Ziauddin Yousafzai says about the 16-year-old Pakistani girl who captured the world's attention after being shot by the Taliban, "but there's something extraordinary about her."

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Parallels
8:43 am
Tue October 15, 2013

How India Has Learned To Deal With Major Cyclones

Villagers eat at a temporary cyclone shelter in Chatrapur, India, on Saturday. India evacuated nearly 1 million people before Cyclone Phailin made landfall. The effort appears to have paid off. As of Tuesday, there were fewer than 30 deaths.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:04 pm

The massive cyclone that hit the eastern Indian state of Orissa over the weekend destroyed tens of thousands of homes, but killed fewer than 30 people.

Another big cyclone struck the same state in 1999; 10,000 people were killed.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Dozens Die In Philippines After Powerful Earthquake

People inspect damage to the Church of San Pedro in the town of Loboc, Bohol, after a powerful earthquake struck the region early on Tuesday. The quake hit near one of the Philippines' key tourist hubs, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.
Robert Michael Poole AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:29 pm

A strong earthquake has left dozens of people dead in the Philippines. The temblor, whose magnitude was first reported as 7.2 and then downgraded to 7.1, struck near the city of Catigbian in the inland area of Bohol, one of the central Visayas Islands.

At least 93 people have been reported dead, and the casualty count is likely to grow as rescue and recovery teams reach areas that were cut off by rubble and other obstructions.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Leaders Express 'Cautious Optimism' Over Iran Nuclear Plan

Catherine Ashton, the EU high representative for foreign affairs, and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif share a light moment Tuesday at the start of two-day talks on Iran's nuclear program.
Fabrice Coffrini AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 1:39 pm

Iran's proposal for easing the standoff over its nuclear program got seemingly positive initial reviews at Tuesday's start of multiparty talks in Geneva.

A spokesman for EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said the Iranian delegation had made a PowerPoint presentation outlining the plan at the beginning of the two-day session. The spokesman said the plan had been received with "cautious optimism" but gave no further details of the close-door meeting, describing the proceedings as "confidential."

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Parallels
5:52 am
Tue October 15, 2013

What The World's Newspapers Are Saying

A London newspaper stand.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 11:31 am

(Editor's Note: Starting this week, we're introducing a weekday feature of headlines from newspapers around the world.)

Britain's Guardian reports on former minister David Maclean, a member of Prime Minister David Cameron's Conservative Party, who says Britain's spy agencies may be operating outside the law in the mass surveillance of the Internet. His remarks come amid revelations about surveillance programs unveiled by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

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Asia
3:12 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Critics Fault BJP's Candidate For Indian Prime Minister

The main opposition party in India has anointed Narendra Modi as its candidate for prime minister in next year's general election. Critics say Modi is a hardline Hindu nationalist who helped foment deadly anti-Muslim riots in 2002.

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