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Lisa Hywood remembers the first time she ever set eyes on a pangolin. It was in 1994, and she had just founded the Tikki Hywood Trust, a wildlife conservation sanctuary in Zimbabwe. One morning, someone dropped off a strange-looking, injured creature that had been confiscated from an illegal trader.

"This animal arrived in a sack and smelling something horrendous," she recalls. "And I looked at this animal and I thought it's like no other mammal that I've ever encountered."

The report that ISIS is forcing girls as young as 12 to become sex slaves is part of a larger issue. In the world today, an estimated 2 million underage girls work in the sex trade.

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There is no shortage of theories about a bombing in Bangkok, Thailand.

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No shortage of theories but only so much evidence. No one has claimed responsibility for yesterday's attack on a popular religious shrine.

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Update, 12:45 a.m.:

At least 22 people were killed and 123 injured in the explosion, authorities reported early Monday, according to CNN; the dead included Filipino Chinese, Singaporean and Malaysian nationals.

Indonesian authorities have spotted a wreckage, which they believe belongs to a missing Trigana Air Service turboprop plane, in a remote area of Papua.

The Financial Times reports:

"Search and rescue aircraft spotted the wreck in the Bintang Mountains, according to Reuters, and are heading to the site to look for any survivors.

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Thousands of people took to the streets in Brazil today in a nationwide protest against the government.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Portuguese).

Two years after the United States deployed the Patriot missile defense system to Turkey, a NATO ally, the system will be withdrawn, the countries announced today.

In a joint statement, Turkey and the U.S. said that the air-defense units would be withdrawn in October, when the original two-year mandate expires. The statement reads, in part:

More than 80 people were killed in a series of Syrian government airstrikes on a marketplace in a rebel-held neighborhood in the capital, Damascus, according to a U.K.-based monitoring group.

Hundreds of Syrian refugees stuck on the Greek island of Kos are now sheltering in a passenger ferry docked near the island.

Thousands — including many families from Syria and Afghanistan — are stranded on Kos, a resort island popular with tourists. There are not enough local police to register and fingerprint the migrants and refugees, who cross on inflatable rafts from the Turkish coast every day.

More bodies were pulled from the wreckage of last week's industrial explosion southeast of Beijing, raising the official death toll to 112, even as nearly 100 others were still missing, officials said.

Chinese authorities said that 85 of the 95 people unaccounted for were firefighters who responded to Wednesday's massive explosions at a warehouse housing hazardous chemicals.

Amid the horrors of war in Syria, Yemen and Iraq, it's become easy to overlook Afghanistan. Remember Afghanistan? Back in the mid-2000s, it was known as the "forgotten war," eclipsed by the bloodshed in Iraq. Now it's overshadowed all over again. But there's plenty of reason to pay attention.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

An Indonesian twin-turboprop plane carrying 54 passengers and crew reportedly crashed in the country's mountainous and densely wooded Papua province, according to the Transportation Ministry.

There was no distress call from the Trigana Air Service ATR42-300. A search plane spotted the wreckage on Monday morning, the Associated Press reports; there is not yet any word on whether there were any survivors.

A man in his early 40s with a kind, weathered face is talking to a room full of children.

"In some ways, all of us are basically abandoned or not really a wanted person," he says. "Everybody kind of give up the hope on us. But in this place, you are welcome and you have opportunity to change, and we will be with you, no matter what. This is a community of love and compassion."

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Before the end of the second World War, Emperor Hirohito was considered by the Japanese to be a living God. And the first time most of his people heard him speak, it was to surrender.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Col. Jean Bikomagu, Burundi's ex-army chief who led the armed forces during the country's more than decade-long civil war, was gunned down in the capital Bujumbura today, the latest in a series of apparent assassinations that the United Nations warns could be causing the country to spiral out of control.

The BBC, via Agence France-Presse, reports that Bikomagu was killed at the gates of his residence and that his daughter was badly wounded.

After months of wrangling and brinkmanship, the Eurozone finally approved the first tranche of an 86 billion euro ($96 billion) bailout for Greece in exchange for a promise from Athens to put its financial house in order. It is the third time in five years that Greece has sought emergency funds to stave off default.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said the approval sent a "loud and clear" message that Greece will remain in the Eurozone — ending concerns that the country would be forced out.

At least 40 migrants were found dead in the hold of a smuggling boat in the Mediterranean off the Libyan coast, as the Italian navy rescued 320 others.

"The dead were found in the hold," Cmdr. Massimo Tosi, speaking from the navy ship Cigala Fulgosi while the rescue was still ongoing, according to The Associated Press. Asked by RaiNews24 how the migrants died, Tosi said "it appears to be from inhaling exhaust fumes."

"They are still counting the victims," Interior Minister Angelino Alfano told reporters.

As The Associated Press notes:

Japan's Emperor Akihito has apologized for his country's actions during World War II, 70 years after its surrender, expressing for the first time "deep remorse" over the death and destruction caused by Japanese forces.

"On this day to commemorate the war dead and pray for peace, my thoughts are with the people who lost their precious lives in the last war and their bereaved families," Emperor Akihito said in a speech during the ceremony.

The Greek island of Kos, near the coast of Turkey, is a popular tourist retreat, but it has also become the latest destination for huge numbers of refugees and migrants going to Europe.

Teachers Nizar and Nasser plotted their escape from the Syrian city of Damascus during coffee breaks at school. They both came from religious minorities threatened by the Islamic State. Worn down by the constant shelling they decided to try to seek asylum in Europe and quickly secure visas for their families, who hid with relatives.

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