World News

The Two-Way
6:04 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Kurdish Leaders Boycott Iraqi Government Meetings

Soldiers with the Kurdish peshmerga man an outpost near Kirkuk, a city they've sought to control during the chaos that has gripped Iraq.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 8:40 am

A dispute between Iraq's Shiite-led central government and the semi-autonomous Kurdish region is boiling over, as Kurdish ministers withdrew from all Cabinet meetings. In response, Baghdad is reportedly halting some cargo flights between Kurdish cities.

The spat is playing out amid the threat posed by the self-proclaimed "Islamic State," an extremist group that has taken over cities and territories in parts of Iraq and Syria.

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Asia
3:04 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Mistrust Overshadows U.S. Talks With China

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. High-level meetings between the U.S. and China underscore a long-term problem. They have the world's two largest economies. They're likely the two most important nations on earth.

INSKEEP: And neither trusts the other's intentions. Because they must cooperate, Secretary of State John Kerry and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew are in Beijing for talks.

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Law
3:01 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Jailed For 3 Months In Mexico, U.S. Marine Reservist Gets Hearing

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now to another source of tension at the border. A trial began yesterday for a former Marine, who spent the last three months in a Mexican jail. He drove into Tijuana with guns in his car. The Marine, now a reservist, says he took a wrong turn and didn't mean to cross the border. Amy Isackson has the story.

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Around the Nation
3:01 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Rumors Motivate Central American Kids To Set Out For U.S. Border

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Music News
3:25 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Dublin Has Garth's Heart, But Not His Concerts Anymore

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Garth Brooks fans abound in Ireland, and now 400,000 of them won't get to the chance to see him perform. Brooks has cancelled five concerts after the Dublin City Council refused to grant him more than three. Melissa Block speaks to Rachel Flaherty of The Irish Times about the controversy.

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Man Tied To Nazis Dies In Michigan At Age 93

John Kalymon talks to The Associated Press in 2009 outside his home in Troy, Mich. Kalymon died June 29.
Paul Sancya AP

John Kalymon of Troy, Mich., died June 29. He was 93. The Associated Press reports that he had pneumonia, prostate cancer and dementia. But during World War II, Kalymon served in a Nazi-allied police force, and for that he'd been ordered deported by a U.S. court.

Kalymon had always denied the claims against him.

"The last two years he had no idea about anything about his life," his son Alex Kalymon told the AP. "He was just struggling to live and his mind wasn't there."

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Parallels
3:05 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

On Opposite Sides Of Israeli-Gaza Border, Feeling The Same Fears

Several families share this one-room underground shelter in Ashkelon, Israel, not far from the border with Gaza. The children say they're afraid to go outside.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

More than 50 Palestinians have been killed and 450 wounded in Israeli airstrikes on the Gaza Strip. Meanwhile, rockets continue to fly toward Israel from Gaza, but so far, no Israelis have been reported killed.

For people living in and around the Gaza Strip, this conflict has turned daily routines upside down. Life is punctuated by sirens and explosions.

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Iraq
2:44 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Amid Bloodshed, Brotherhood: Links Forged From Iraq's Game Of Rings

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

In Iraq, a Ramadan game called Mheibbis brings even Sunnis and Shiites together in peaceful competition. A ring game traditionally played between neighborhoods during the holy month, Mheibbis has offered men the opportunity to break Baghdad's tension and offer messages of unity and brotherhood — even between rival sects.

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Iraq
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Plight Of Mosul's Museum: Iraqi Antiquities At Risk Of Ruin

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Middle East
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Rockets From Hamas, And The Iron Dome That Could Use Patching

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Europe
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

In Germany, A Case Against Another Alleged American Spy

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Asia
2:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Ballad Of The 13-Year-Old North Korean Capitalist

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In North Korea, private businesses are illegal - or at least they're technically illegal. People aren't supposed to buy and sell stuff to each other, but they do it anyway. NPR's Zoe Chace, of our Planet Money team, has this story of a young North Korean woman who knew a business opportunity when she saw it, and had no qualms about pursuing it. One word - socks.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: She's just 23 years old. Easily excited, she wears makeup, a bright pink dress, likes to speak a little bit of English.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

What Happens When Israeli Mourners Visit A Palestinian Family

On Monday, Hussein Abu Khdeir, father of 16-year-old Palestinian Mohammed Abu Khdeir, held a photo of his son as he met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank. On Tuesday, the Abu Khdeir family received Israeli guests who wanted to apologize for their loss.
Mohamad Torokman AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:30 pm

The family of slain Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir received condolences from an unlikely source Tuesday: Israelis who had asked to come and mourn with them.

The scene was predictably awkward, even painfully so. But as NPR's Ari Shapiro reported for today's Morning Edition, the visit also brought a moment of grace for many of those involved.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Rivals Claim Victory In Indonesian Presidential Election

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo claimed victory on Wednesday.
Bagus Indahono EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:52 pm

Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo, who entered national politics just two years ago, has claimed victory citing early results in the presidential election in Indonesia, the world's most-populous Muslim nation. But his main rival, former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, is refusing to concede.

"This is the victory of the whole Indonesian population!" Widodo said.

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Goats and Soda
7:56 am
Wed July 9, 2014

This Kenyan Runner Can't See But He Has A Far-Reaching Vision

Joseph Kibunja guides blind runner Henry Wanyoike (in sunglasses).
Ryan Kellman NPR

When Henry Wanyoike and Joseph Kibunja first started running, it was out of necessity. The childhood friends had no other way to travel the three miles from their Kenyan village to school. So they made the barefoot trek every day, in both directions, regardless of weather.

Thirty years later, Wanyoike and Kibunja are still running together, only now, they're headed to the finish lines of races around the world — and often getting there first.

Although Kenya is known for producing champion runners, the duo stands out: Wanyoike is blind and Kibunja serves as his guide.

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Goats and Soda
7:43 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Volunteer Recap: A Bumpy (And Itchy) Ride Through Tanzania

Nick Stadlberger in Africa.
Courtesy of Nick Stadlberger

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:44 pm

Nick Stadlberger, a fourth-year medical student at Dartmouth College spent four weeks this spring in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, working in the infectious disease ward at Muhimbili Hospital as part of his school's global health program.

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The Two-Way
5:23 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Israel Continues Gaza Offensive, Hints At Ground Operation

Smoke and debris rise after an Israeli strike on the Gaza Strip Wednesday. Since the Gaza offensive began Tuesday, Israel has attacked more than 400 sites in Gaza.
Ariel Schalit AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:21 pm

Update at 2:42 p.m. ET

Israeli leaders are signaling that a ground invasion might be imminent as the offensive on Gaza intensifies, killing at least 53 people and wounding 465 others.

The toll comes from the Palestinian Authority's Health Ministry.

Reporter Daniel Estrin tells NPR's Newscast unit that Israel's military struck at least 200 Hamas targets on the second day of its offensive on the Gaza Strip. The operation is in response to rocket attacks from Gaza toward Israeli cities.

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Middle East
4:34 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Unwelcomed At First, Israelis Mourn Palestinian Teen's Death With His Family

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

Family members of slain Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khadier said they didn't want an Israeli condolence visit. But the Israelis arrived anyway. The scene went from anger to tears.

Sports
4:17 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Brazilians Lick Wounds After World Cup Loss To Germany

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

I'm Renee Montagne. Brazilians are waking up this morning hoping it was all just a bad dream. In the World Cup semi-final yesterday, the host country was clobbered by Germany 7-1. Brazil invested a lot in making the tournament a success. And its citizens were left to look on in anguish as their team went down in a loss of historic proportions. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro watched at a bar in Sao Paulo.

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Middle East
4:09 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Gas In Egypt Is 78 Percent More Expensive Now Than Last Week

Egyptians gather at a petrol station in Cairo as the government drastically raised fuel prices to tackle a bloated subsidy system on July 5.
Mahmoud Khaled AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:51 pm

It's 2 p.m. on a hot day in Cairo and cars are lined up for blocks at this gas station in the east of the capital. People are waiting to fill their cars with the cheapest gas available — which is 78 percent more expensive than it was last week.

Ali Fayoumi yells from his window.

"I've been waiting for an hour and a half," he fumes. "Even the cheapest gas is too expensive. Everything is expensive, food, drink, everything."

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Sports
3:06 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Brazil Wakes Up To Find Tuesday's Nightmare Was Not A Dream

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:46 am

Host country Brazil was eliminated from the World Cup in epic fashion: Germany defeated Brazil 7-1 during the semifinal match. Brazilians are wondering how their beloved team could be so pulverized.

Afghanistan
3:06 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Afghan Civilians Suffer During Violent Year

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

There is renewed fighting in Kandahar as the outcome of the Afghan presidential election remains uncertain. And a new U.N. report says civilian casualties are up significantly from a year ago.

Parallels
3:14 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Against 'Islamic State' Militants, Treasury May Need To Try New Tools

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:24 pm

In the fight against terrorist organizations, one weapon has been effective in the past: cutting off their funding.

Terrorist groups tend to get their money from outside donors or charities. But the Islamic State, the group that now controls huge areas of Syria and Iraq, doesn't get its money that way. So the methods the U.S. Treasury has used to fight terrorist groups in the past won't work as well.

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Afghanistan
2:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Early Vote Tallies Speed The Sparring Between Afghan Candidates

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:13 pm

Preliminary voting tallies in the Afghan presidential election, released Monday, did little to ease a brewing political crisis. The losing candidate continued to claim fraud, declaring himself the winner instead. Meanwhile, the U.S. is warning of a power grab.

News
2:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In Oslo, Attorney General Warns Syria May Be A Cradle Of Terrorism

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:13 pm

In a speech in Oslo, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder urged European partners to do more to find and disrupt plans of would-be terrorists who head to Syria — and, once trained, might return to the West.

Middle East
2:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In Battle Over Gaza, A Slow Build-up Shows No Signs Of Ending

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:13 pm

Israel stepped up its air assault on the Gaza Strip, following the killings of Israeli and Palestinian teens. Unlike air strikes in the past, Israel has tempered its initial show of force for several reasons, but the situation appears to be steadily intensifying.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Africa
2:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Battered By Civil War, South Sudan Falters Toward 3rd Birthday

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Three years ago this was the sound of freedom being celebrated in the world's newest country.

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Singing in foreign language).

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Latin America
2:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

With Default 23 Days Away, A Little Clause Could Cost Argentina Big

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The clock is ticking for Argentina. Yes, in the World Cup, but here, we're talking about its effort to prevent another debt crisis. Argentina has until the end of this month to pay its bondholders or it risks going into default. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, the dispute hinges on one particular clause in the country's debt contracts that could cost the country billions of dollars.

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Goats and Soda
12:47 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Going, Going, Almost Gone: A Worm Verges On Extinction

Nakal Longolio Acii, 9, had to stay several weeks at a Guinea worm clinic in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan, while health workers coaxed the parasite out of her leg.
Louise Gubb Courtesy of The Carter Center

Guinea worm is about as close to a real-life Alien event as you can get — a parasitic worm mates inside a person's abdomen, grows up to 3 feet long and then exits (painfully) from a blister.

But the worm's final chapter is near: The world is closer than ever to wiping the parasite off the face of the Earth.

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Goats and Soda
10:36 am
Tue July 8, 2014

What's In Our Name: Why Goats? Why Soda?

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 6:23 pm

"Goats and Soda: Stories of Life in a Changing World."

That's the name of NPR's new blog, covering health and all sorts of development around the world.

You may be thinking: "Goats? Soda? This blog is going to look at communicable diseases, education struggles, sanitation concerns ... and it's called 'Goats and Soda'?"

We considered many names. A few seemed promising but fell short. Unarrested Development? Globelandia? Up the Road? They were too long, too hard to say on the radio or too vague.

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